Looking for a notebook

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I am looking for a laptop to buy as desktop replacement. I am not sure
what I am looking for, so I seek your advice. Actually I am a final year
student doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my
project using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my
work, 1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+. But I am going to france for four
months and I wish to buy a laptop primarily to continue on my project
there. So what kind of laptop do you recommend me? Asus? Dell?
Alienware? (are these available in france?) I am not sure about
Centrino, or P4 or Athlon64? I have a fairly limited budget, and I
wouldnt mind a good graphics card on the laptop.
Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
the UK are significantly lower.
16 answers Last reply
More about looking notebook
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:10:48 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >I am looking for a laptop to buy as desktop replacement. I am not sure
    >what I am looking for, so I seek your advice. Actually I am a final year
    >student doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my
    >project using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my
    >work, 1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+. But I am going to france for four
    >months and I wish to buy a laptop primarily to continue on my project
    >there. So what kind of laptop do you recommend me? Asus? Dell?
    >Alienware? (are these available in france?) I am not sure about
    >Centrino, or P4 or Athlon64? I have a fairly limited budget, and I
    >wouldnt mind a good graphics card on the laptop.
    >Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >the UK are significantly lower.

    First, note that though Centrino usually is usually taken to mean Pentium
    M, it really means the Intel platform of Pentium M, Intel chipset and Intel
    Wi-Fi - IOW you can get a Pentium M which is not a Centrino if it has, say,
    Cisco Wi-Fi.

    You won't get prices much better than in the U.S. AFAIK. I used to buy
    cheap notebooks, like Winbooks, but I got tired of damage from just general
    use/abuse and flexible cases which sometimes led to other problems. I now
    buy Thinkpad T4x models because they are rugged enough stand up to the
    abuse they get on the road... and they have well designed keyboard, mousing
    etc. AFAIK the R5x models are close in overall design for a bit less $$.

    The only Dell notebook I've seen in the last 2 years or so was with
    somebody from one of our other offices - it hung our entire network on
    shutdown and had severe cursor drift problems. He now has a Thinkpad T4x.

    You didn't say how important travel ruggedness and battery life is to you
    and those are usually big factors in notebook choice IMO. If battery life
    is a big plus, then I wouldn't look beyond a Pentium M based system. I
    don't know much about other notebooks, other than Thinkpads, but when I
    took a look at Toshibas, HPs etc. at CompUSA, I was not impressed.

    If you're intrigued by an AMD CPU, one of the few mfrs is Acer but again, I
    know nothing of their reliability/service record - they have Athlon64 and
    Sempron models, the latter being an Athlon 64 with 64-bit mode disabled.
    You might want to find one in a store to see how it feels - prices at
    www.newegg.com are pretty good and AFAIK Acer is one of the few companies
    which actually still manufactures notebooks. As for Celeron, P4, forget
    them, underpowered and too hot respectively.

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:10:48 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >I am looking for a laptop to buy as desktop replacement. I am not sure
    >what I am looking for, so I seek your advice. Actually I am a final year
    >student doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my
    >project using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my
    >work, 1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+. But I am going to france for four
    >months and I wish to buy a laptop primarily to continue on my project
    >there. So what kind of laptop do you recommend me? Asus? Dell?

    I would generally avoid Dell, HPaq and Gateway, all three of which are
    actually the same damn laptops under the stickers (these companies
    have outsourced all their production to two or three companies in
    Taiwan). Generally speaking the quality of these machines is pretty
    low. If you do decide for on of these though, ONLY get one of their
    "business" class laptops, support for consumer-grade laptops from
    these companies is generally abysmal.

    Asus has some VERY nice looking laptops, though I don't have any
    personal experience with them one way or another.

    >Alienware? (are these available in france?) I am not sure about

    To the best of my knowledge, Alienware is only really sold in North
    America.

    >Centrino, or P4 or Athlon64?

    First off, P4 and Athlon64 are processors, Centrino is a marketing
    campaign, kinda different beasts here. What you might be thinking of
    is the Pentium-M processor which is part of the Centrino marketing
    campaign, and it's probably the best mobile processor out there. The
    downside to the P-M is that it's also the most expensive mobile
    processor out there.

    Athlon64 mobile chips consume a fair bit more power than Pentium-M
    chips, but are cheaper and often faster. Pentium4 mobile chips
    consume more power, are expensive and are not faster... so they really
    can be ruled out quite safely (I have no idea why anyone would buy one
    of those chips for a laptop these days!)

    Another option, if you can find them, would be AMD's mobile Sempron
    "Thin and Light" chips. Performance in the same range as the
    Pentium-M, only slightly higher power consumption and MUCH lower
    prices. Sadly though, these chips are VERY hard to find in decent
    laptops, the few companies that do use Sempron chips seem to use the
    more power-hungry "Desktop Replacement" chips.

    Intel's low-cost alternative isn't so great. High power consumption
    and low performance make it rather unattractive, though at least they
    are cheap and plentiful. The Celeron-M is slightly better, though I
    always get a foul taste in my mouth with the way that Intel just
    intentionally disables some power-saving features from their Pentium-M
    chips to make the Celeron-M, just so that they can segment the market
    better.

    > I have a fairly limited budget, and I
    >wouldnt mind a good graphics card on the laptop.

    Personally if it were me, I would probably opt for a Toshiba laptop
    using a Pentium-M processor (actually I would probably opt for an
    Apple iBook... but that's a whole other can of worms!). If you want
    decent graphics than you'll probably have to pony up a few extra bucks
    for an upgrade option to something like an ATI Mobility Radeon 9700.
    Such a setup can be found for $1250 for a Satellite M30X with a bit of
    tweaking.

    IBM is also a good option, though you tend to pay a definite premium
    for a Thinkpad.

    >Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >the UK are significantly lower.

    Prices in the UK tend to be exorbitant, though I suspect that they are
    no better in France. If you're currently in North America (or
    South-East Asia) where prices are cheap, I would recommend buying
    before you leave. Just keep in mind that you'll need a different
    power adapter over there.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 03:42:02 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    wrote:

    >>Centrino, or P4 or Athlon64?
    >
    >First off, P4 and Athlon64 are processors, Centrino is a marketing
    >campaign, kinda different beasts here. What you might be thinking of
    >is the Pentium-M processor which is part of the Centrino marketing
    >campaign, and it's probably the best mobile processor out there. The
    >downside to the P-M is that it's also the most expensive mobile
    >processor out there.
    >
    >Athlon64 mobile chips consume a fair bit more power than Pentium-M
    >chips, but are cheaper and often faster. Pentium4 mobile chips
    >consume more power, are expensive and are not faster... so they really
    >can be ruled out quite safely (I have no idea why anyone would buy one
    >of those chips for a laptop these days!)
    >
    >Another option, if you can find them, would be AMD's mobile Sempron
    >"Thin and Light" chips. Performance in the same range as the
    >Pentium-M, only slightly higher power consumption and MUCH lower
    >prices. Sadly though, these chips are VERY hard to find in decent
    >laptops, the few companies that do use Sempron chips seem to use the
    >more power-hungry "Desktop Replacement" chips.

    I see Acer has a mobile Sempron model,
    http://us.acer.com/acerpanam/page4.do?dau22.oid=5295&UserCtxParam=0&GroupCtxParam=0&dctx1=25&ctx1=US&crc=1875133230
    but I've no idea how Acer's general quality is. Anybody any idea? IIRC a
    couple of years ago they were making one of IBM's lower priced range -- the
    i-Series -- and people didn't think much of it. Then again, Unichrome
    graphics is probably not what we want.

    >Personally if it were me, I would probably opt for a Toshiba laptop
    >using a Pentium-M processor (actually I would probably opt for an
    >Apple iBook... but that's a whole other can of worms!). If you want
    >decent graphics than you'll probably have to pony up a few extra bucks
    >for an upgrade option to something like an ATI Mobility Radeon 9700.
    >Such a setup can be found for $1250 for a Satellite M30X with a bit of
    >tweaking.
    >
    >IBM is also a good option, though you tend to pay a definite premium
    >for a Thinkpad.

    If you're willing to go for a model with 1 year warranty, I see Thinkpads
    not much more than other decent systems.

    >>Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >>the UK are significantly lower.
    >
    >Prices in the UK tend to be exorbitant, though I suspect that they are
    >no better in France. If you're currently in North America (or
    >South-East Asia) where prices are cheap, I would recommend buying
    >before you leave. Just keep in mind that you'll need a different
    >power adapter over there.

    Huh? Aren't all the power bricks universal now? The ones that come with
    Thinkpads are.

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    George Macdonald wrote:
    > On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:10:48 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:
    >
    >
    > First, note that though Centrino usually is usually taken to mean Pentium
    > M, it really means the Intel platform of Pentium M, Intel chipset and Intel
    > Wi-Fi - IOW you can get a Pentium M which is not a Centrino if it has, say,
    > Cisco Wi-Fi.
    >

    Thank you everyone for your responses. I am a bit unsure choosing the
    Pentium M because I am going to use the machine for relatively power
    consuming jobs, java compilation, application server & local mysql
    database, and perhaps a little bit of gaming. Can you assure me that the
    Pentium M is ok for that? That is why I was bending more towards an
    Athlon64. And yes, is the mobile Sempron the same as a mobile Athlon64
    with 64-bit mode disabled? Same cache?

    From your posts, I see that IBM Thinkpads are among the best laptops. I
    will surely look out for these. I have also been looking at Alienware's
    laptops but their prices are way out of my budget!!! Its too bad I shall
    not be in the US to benefit the low prices there.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Sat, 26 Feb 2005 09:23:33 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >George Macdonald wrote:
    >> On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:10:48 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> First, note that though Centrino usually is usually taken to mean Pentium
    >> M, it really means the Intel platform of Pentium M, Intel chipset and Intel
    >> Wi-Fi - IOW you can get a Pentium M which is not a Centrino if it has, say,
    >> Cisco Wi-Fi.
    >>
    >
    >Thank you everyone for your responses. I am a bit unsure choosing the
    >Pentium M because I am going to use the machine for relatively power
    >consuming jobs, java compilation, application server & local mysql
    >database, and perhaps a little bit of gaming. Can you assure me that the
    >Pentium M is ok for that? That is why I was bending more towards an
    >Athlon64. And yes, is the mobile Sempron the same as a mobile Athlon64
    >with 64-bit mode disabled? Same cache?

    No, you're right - the Sempron has a smaller cache. Take a look at Acer's
    Web site and www.amd.com for details. As for the Pentium M, figure its
    clock speeds as roughly comparable performance-wise to Athlon XP actual
    clock speeds; it suffers a bit on memory bandwidth because of lower FSB
    speed and lack of dual channel memory chipsets... until recently anyway. I
    don't know if we'll see dual channel notebooks very soon, nor at what
    price. Take a look here
    http://www.techreport.com/reviews/2005q1/dfi-855gme-mgf/index.x?pg=1 for
    comparative performance of Pentium M in a desktop mbrd.

    > From your posts, I see that IBM Thinkpads are among the best laptops. I
    >will surely look out for these. I have also been looking at Alienware's
    >laptops but their prices are way out of my budget!!! Its too bad I shall
    >not be in the US to benefit the low prices there.

    Sorry it wasn't clear to me where you were traveling from.:-) In the
    Euro-zone, you might also look at some of the Fujitsu-Siemens laptops -
    they had some AMD systems a while back but I haven't looked recently. See
    http://www.fujitsu-siemens.co.uk/products/mobile/notebooks/index.html

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Sat, 26 Feb 2005 09:23:33 +0400, Nadeem wrote:

    <snip>

    > Thank you everyone for your responses. I am a bit unsure choosing the
    > Pentium M because I am going to use the machine for relatively power
    > consuming jobs, java compilation, application server & local mysql
    > database, and perhaps a little bit of gaming. Can you assure me that the
    > Pentium M is ok for that?

    Mobile systems aren't as fast as their desktop counterparts, in any case.
    They tend to be optimized for power, not performance. If you're really
    worried about performance be sure to look hard at the disk drives. Most
    disk drives used in laptops are sloowwww. Also, juice up the laptop with
    as much memory as you can afford (in an attempt to offset the drive speed).

    <snip other stuff answered by George>

    --
    Keith
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 05:26:17 -0500, George Macdonald
    <fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:

    >On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 03:42:02 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Another option, if you can find them, would be AMD's mobile Sempron
    >>"Thin and Light" chips. Performance in the same range as the
    >>Pentium-M, only slightly higher power consumption and MUCH lower
    >>prices. Sadly though, these chips are VERY hard to find in decent
    >>laptops, the few companies that do use Sempron chips seem to use the
    >>more power-hungry "Desktop Replacement" chips.
    >
    >I see Acer has a mobile Sempron model,
    >http://us.acer.com/acerpanam/page4.do?dau22.oid=5295&UserCtxParam=0&GroupCtxParam=0&dctx1=25&ctx1=US&crc=1875133230

    It does indeed use a Sempron, but only one of the Desktop Replacement
    chips with a TDP of 62W. The interesting Semprons are the "Thin and
    Light" chips which cost only about $30 more and had a TDP of only 25W.

    >but I've no idea how Acer's general quality is. Anybody any idea? IIRC a
    >couple of years ago they were making one of IBM's lower priced range -- the
    >i-Series -- and people didn't think much of it. Then again, Unichrome
    >graphics is probably not what we want.

    Definitely not!

    >>Personally if it were me, I would probably opt for a Toshiba laptop
    >>using a Pentium-M processor (actually I would probably opt for an
    >>Apple iBook... but that's a whole other can of worms!). If you want
    >>decent graphics than you'll probably have to pony up a few extra bucks
    >>for an upgrade option to something like an ATI Mobility Radeon 9700.
    >>Such a setup can be found for $1250 for a Satellite M30X with a bit of
    >>tweaking.
    >>
    >>IBM is also a good option, though you tend to pay a definite premium
    >>for a Thinkpad.
    >
    >If you're willing to go for a model with 1 year warranty, I see Thinkpads
    >not much more than other decent systems.

    Laptops are one of the few computer parts where I might spring for the
    3 year warranty, regardless of who I bought it from. Laptop are
    rather fragile and replacement parts are hard to find and expensive.

    >>>Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >>>the UK are significantly lower.
    >>
    >>Prices in the UK tend to be exorbitant, though I suspect that they are
    >>no better in France. If you're currently in North America (or
    >>South-East Asia) where prices are cheap, I would recommend buying
    >>before you leave. Just keep in mind that you'll need a different
    >>power adapter over there.
    >
    >Huh? Aren't all the power bricks universal now? The ones that come with
    >Thinkpads are.

    Could be, I can't say I've used one for a while. At the very least
    though you'll need a different power cable, and in some cases the
    cable is integrated into the power brick.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    George Macdonald wrote:
    >
    >
    > Sorry it wasn't clear to me where you were traveling from.:-) In the
    > Euro-zone, you might also look at some of the Fujitsu-Siemens laptops -
    > they had some AMD systems a while back but I haven't looked recently. See
    > http://www.fujitsu-siemens.co.uk/products/mobile/notebooks/index.html
    >

    I am travelling from my home country, Mauritius.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:10:48 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >I am looking for a laptop to buy as desktop replacement. I am not sure
    >what I am looking for, so I seek your advice. Actually I am a final year
    >student doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my
    >project using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my
    >work, 1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+. But I am going to france for four
    >months and I wish to buy a laptop primarily to continue on my project
    >there. So what kind of laptop do you recommend me? Asus? Dell?
    >Alienware? (are these available in france?) I am not sure about
    >Centrino, or P4 or Athlon64? I have a fairly limited budget, and I
    >wouldnt mind a good graphics card on the laptop.
    >Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >the UK are significantly lower.

    1. Brand name these days matters not much more than the logo
    representing it. Anyway all these laptops are built these days in
    China (best case - Taiwan) from mostly Taiwanese components by
    Taiwanese contractors for ____(Dell, HP, Gateway - fill the blank).
    IBM Thinkpad? Learn its new name - Lenovo Thinkpad. Well, IBM logo
    may be loaned to Lenovo for marketing purpose, but it will not change
    the fact that it's a Chinese company making them.
    2. If you are concerned about battery life, nothing beats Pentium M
    at this. However, being tweaked for low power consumption, it is not
    the speed demon. A64 beats PM at almost every benchmark, but it will
    drain the battery almost twice as fast. Besides, A64-based notebooks
    tend to have bigger, heavier displays, so don't waste your time
    looking for A64 in thin-and-light class - this one is reserved for PM,
    often in the shape of Celeron M (with cut down cache and even lower
    power consumption). P4? It's the hottest chip out there (thermally),
    and its performance is generally below that of A64, though a tad above
    PM.
    Having said all that, I'd still advice you to search both Internet and
    local newspapers and look at the deals and specs. It might happen
    that the particular deal, while not offering the best components,
    gives the best bang for your buck (or Euro, Pound, or whatever
    currency is used at that place).
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Sat, 26 Feb 2005 16:27:30 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 05:26:17 -0500, George Macdonald
    ><fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 03:42:02 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Another option, if you can find them, would be AMD's mobile Sempron
    >>>"Thin and Light" chips. Performance in the same range as the
    >>>Pentium-M, only slightly higher power consumption and MUCH lower
    >>>prices. Sadly though, these chips are VERY hard to find in decent
    >>>laptops, the few companies that do use Sempron chips seem to use the
    >>>more power-hungry "Desktop Replacement" chips.
    >>
    >>I see Acer has a mobile Sempron model,
    >>http://us.acer.com/acerpanam/page4.do?dau22.oid=5295&UserCtxParam=0&GroupCtxParam=0&dctx1=25&ctx1=US&crc=1875133230
    >
    >It does indeed use a Sempron, but only one of the Desktop Replacement
    >chips with a TDP of 62W. The interesting Semprons are the "Thin and
    >Light" chips which cost only about $30 more and had a TDP of only 25W.

    The dearth of details on such info is one area where AMD is falling down
    badly - if people don't know what they are buying they will look elsewhere.
    IOW I dunno where you got it... but Acer is claiming battery life up to
    3hrs

    >>but I've no idea how Acer's general quality is. Anybody any idea? IIRC a
    >>couple of years ago they were making one of IBM's lower priced range -- the
    >>i-Series -- and people didn't think much of it. Then again, Unichrome
    >>graphics is probably not what we want.
    >
    >Definitely not!

    What?... even worse than Extreme(ly) bad?:-)

    >>>Personally if it were me, I would probably opt for a Toshiba laptop
    >>>using a Pentium-M processor (actually I would probably opt for an
    >>>Apple iBook... but that's a whole other can of worms!). If you want
    >>>decent graphics than you'll probably have to pony up a few extra bucks
    >>>for an upgrade option to something like an ATI Mobility Radeon 9700.
    >>>Such a setup can be found for $1250 for a Satellite M30X with a bit of
    >>>tweaking.
    >>>
    >>>IBM is also a good option, though you tend to pay a definite premium
    >>>for a Thinkpad.
    >>
    >>If you're willing to go for a model with 1 year warranty, I see Thinkpads
    >>not much more than other decent systems.
    >
    >Laptops are one of the few computer parts where I might spring for the
    >3 year warranty, regardless of who I bought it from. Laptop are
    >rather fragile and replacement parts are hard to find and expensive.

    Parts? Apart from HDs you're pretty much at the mercy of the
    manufacturer... and repair is usually not an option outside warranty. In
    one case, with a broken screen, I found it was cheaper to buy a new
    base-model same-series laptop and swap parts than to have the broken screen
    replaced.

    >>>>Any suggestions? I can travel to UK to get the laptop there if prices in
    >>>>the UK are significantly lower.
    >>>
    >>>Prices in the UK tend to be exorbitant, though I suspect that they are
    >>>no better in France. If you're currently in North America (or
    >>>South-East Asia) where prices are cheap, I would recommend buying
    >>>before you leave. Just keep in mind that you'll need a different
    >>>power adapter over there.
    >>
    >>Huh? Aren't all the power bricks universal now? The ones that come with
    >>Thinkpads are.
    >
    >Could be, I can't say I've used one for a while. At the very least
    >though you'll need a different power cable, and in some cases the
    >cable is integrated into the power brick.

    I haven't seen a voltage specific power module for years - our Thinkpads
    and InFocus projector and my Samsung LCD monitor all came with universal.
    As for the power cord, you can pick up a multi-plug adapter at any small
    appliance or hardware store in the destination country.

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:47:13 -0500, George Macdonald
    <fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:

    >On Sat, 26 Feb 2005 16:27:30 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>It does indeed use a Sempron, but only one of the Desktop Replacement
    >>chips with a TDP of 62W. The interesting Semprons are the "Thin and
    >>Light" chips which cost only about $30 more and had a TDP of only 25W.
    >
    >The dearth of details on such info is one area where AMD is falling down
    >badly - if people don't know what they are buying they will look elsewhere.

    I agree, the info is damn near impossible to find, even if you know
    what you're looking for. It doesn't help that AMD doesn't provide ANY
    technical docs for their mobile processors, so you have to kind of
    feel your way through things in their marketing trash.

    >IOW I dunno where you got it... but Acer is claiming battery life up to
    >3hrs

    Claiming 3 hour battery life is par for the course in a desktop
    replacement these days. Whether or not you'll actually see that is
    another question. However the good long-life mobile solutions have 5+
    hour battery lives.

    As for where I got the info, to tell you the truth, I'm not 100% sure
    at this stage. I had being going on AMD's own terminology for things,
    that the "Mobile AMD Sempron" is one chip and the "Mobile AMD Sempron
    for Thin and Light notebooks" was another chip. However they may well
    be ignoring this naming convention and using whatever the hell chip
    they feel like.

    Either way, chances are that if they don't specify, they're using the
    cheaper alternative. You are quite correct though that there is a
    HUGE lack of information from AMD with regards to their mobile
    processors.

    >>>but I've no idea how Acer's general quality is. Anybody any idea? IIRC a
    >>>couple of years ago they were making one of IBM's lower priced range -- the
    >>>i-Series -- and people didn't think much of it. Then again, Unichrome
    >>>graphics is probably not what we want.
    >>
    >>Definitely not!
    >
    >What?... even worse than Extreme(ly) bad?:-)

    Worse, it's Hyper-bad! :>

    >>Laptops are one of the few computer parts where I might spring for the
    >>3 year warranty, regardless of who I bought it from. Laptop are
    >>rather fragile and replacement parts are hard to find and expensive.
    >
    >Parts? Apart from HDs you're pretty much at the mercy of the
    >manufacturer... and repair is usually not an option outside warranty. In
    >one case, with a broken screen, I found it was cheaper to buy a new
    >base-model same-series laptop and swap parts than to have the broken screen
    >replaced.

    That's about the long and the short of it, hence the reason for the
    3-year warranty.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 02:15:10 -0500, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
    wrote:

    >Either way, chances are that if they don't specify, they're using the
    >cheaper alternative. You are quite correct though that there is a
    >HUGE lack of information from AMD with regards to their mobile
    >processors.

    The AMD product "info" is taking on a paranoid "compare with 'equivalent'
    Intel" flavor - it was always there to a certain extent but it's getting
    worse instead of better and unhealthy IMO. This is not the stance of a
    player who believes they can really compete on equal terms on an even
    playing field... and we know the field is not even anyway. Time to stand
    up and act like they *know* they have better stuff.

    Personally I don't believe that Centrino has been the reason for the
    Pentium M success in notebooks... not as much as Intel wants to believe it
    anyway. They could be on the wrong track completely with the soon to be
    announced "Desktrino" but I guess we'll see. At any rate, I wish AMD would
    get its propaganda machine working effectively as far as getting accurate
    info out which can be used to make purchasing decisions.

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    Tony Hill wrote:
    > On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:47:13 -0500, George Macdonald
    > <fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:
    >
    >

    Hi! How about AMD Athlon XP laptops? Here in mauritius I can find a
    Laptop Toshiba AthlonXP 3000+ with 15', 512MB & DVD-ROM CDRW Combo at
    around Rs 39,000 ( Rs 30 = 1$).

    Are these CPUs power drains?
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 09:03:17 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >Hi! How about AMD Athlon XP laptops? Here in mauritius I can find a
    >Laptop Toshiba AthlonXP 3000+ with 15', 512MB & DVD-ROM CDRW Combo at
    >around Rs 39,000 ( Rs 30 = 1$).
    >
    >Are these CPUs power drains?

    Judging by your original posting that started the thread -
    :doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my project
    :using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my work,
    :1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+.
    - this spec has plenty of power for your needs. I had some
    experience with Toshiba, some good (486 circa 1993), some bad (P166MMX
    circa 1997 and P2-400? circa 1999), but it's hardly relevant today.
    As for the price, it looks outrageously high by US standards - you
    should've gotten a PM or A64 for that kind of money around here, but
    you know better your local prices. While AXP does not compare to PM
    in terms of power drain, it's roughly in the same league as equally
    performing P4. Also it depends pretty much on the kind of task you
    run. If you encode DVDs, even with PM the battery probably would quit
    before it's done.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    nobody@nowhere.net wrote:
    > On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 09:03:17 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:
    > Judging by your original posting that started the thread -
    > :doing my degree programme in Computing, and i am doing my project
    > :using a J2EE architecture. My home machine is pretty fine for my work,
    > :1 Gig RAM with Athlon XP 2400+.
    > - this spec has plenty of power for your needs.

    I think so too, but I would surely like 1 Gig RAM...you know..for the
    sake of boasting around with friends... :-P

    > I had some
    > experience with Toshiba, some good (486 circa 1993), some bad (P166MMX
    > circa 1997 and P2-400? circa 1999), but it's hardly relevant today.
    > As for the price, it looks outrageously high by US standards

    Well Mauritius is a country on the other side of the globe.. :)

    - you
    > should've gotten a PM or A64 for that kind of money around here, but
    > you know better your local prices. While AXP does not compare to PM
    > in terms of power drain, it's roughly in the same league as equally
    > performing P4. Also it depends pretty much on the kind of task you
    > run. If you encode DVDs, even with PM the battery probably would quit
    > before it's done.
    >

    How about batteries?! Should I buy a spare battery if ever am choosing a
    laptop?
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 09:03:17 +0400, Nadeem <nadeem@ask.me> wrote:

    >Tony Hill wrote:
    >> On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:47:13 -0500, George Macdonald
    >> <fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Hi! How about AMD Athlon XP laptops? Here in mauritius I can find a
    >Laptop Toshiba AthlonXP 3000+ with 15', 512MB & DVD-ROM CDRW Combo at
    >around Rs 39,000 ( Rs 30 = 1$).
    >
    >Are these CPUs power drains?

    I would tend to avoid them unless you're getting a good deal on the
    system. The power consumption of the AthlonXP is not huge, but it
    would be higher than an Athlon64 or Sempron of similar performance
    levels. Probably fairly similar to a P4 chip, though at a somewhat
    lower cost. Nothing too interesting though.

    Personally my choice would be either an AMD Mobile Sempron or
    Celeron-M for the low-end of things, or a Pentium-M or possibly Mobile
    Athlon64 for the higher end of things. Unless prices in your neck of
    the woods are quite different from around here, there probably won't
    be much of a cost advantage to this AthlonXP vs. the Sempron or
    Celeron-M.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
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