Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

question about static buildup

Last response: in CPUs
Share
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 2, 2005 11:41:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I was thinking about building a rack enclosure for a server / storage
array in my garage.

I realize the hardware may get hot, so I was going to use a very small
AC mounted to the rack to cool it, at about 65F. I will also try to
build the rack enclosure to be fairly air tight.

The only problem is that the AC will probably reduce the humidity to a
low amount in the enclosure.

I fear the dry air flowing through the case/chips/ boards etc. will
create static electricity. Is this how it works? I know how to
prevent static when it is built up on myself, but can it build up on
my machine and cause hardware problems without anyone touching it?
And is there anything I can do to reduce static buildup in this
environment?

Randall Fox
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2005 7:31:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

You shouldn't have a problem, static electricity builds up in dry air
more than humid air, true, but static electricity isn't caused by dry
air. Besides, the engineers who designed the systems involved would
have considered they would be used in very dry environments.

I would make sure you ground the chassis of each system (which will
ground the equipment in that system) and the enclosure and the AC
unit.

I have used a setup very similar to the one you described (although a
much larger scale) that had been running for years. It never had a
problem with static buildup.

Good Luck!
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 3, 2005 11:16:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Tue, 03 May 2005 15:31:09 +0000,
daveclark@clarkrealtyinc-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (rivalarrival) wrote:

>You shouldn't have a problem, static electricity builds up in dry air
>more than humid air, true, but static electricity isn't caused by dry
>air. Besides, the engineers who designed the systems involved would
>have considered they would be used in very dry environments.
>
>I would make sure you ground the chassis of each system (which will
>ground the equipment in that system) and the enclosure and the AC
>unit.
>
>I have used a setup very similar to the one you described (although a
>much larger scale) that had been running for years. It never had a
>problem with static buildup.


Thanks for your response. I do intend to ground the unit, but the
only thing that I feared was buildup of static electricity on the unit
itself. I assumed that dry air flying by a component would create a
static charge. I know this is true for the wings of planes.

The thing I was not aware of is the capacity of the equipment to
dispell such a charge. I know if the case is grounded, the charge
should dissipate, but I am not aware of how the other components will
handle it. I would assume that they would be adequately grounded as
well, by the fact that they are attached to the case.

Its good to hear that you never had problems associated with a setup
like this.

Thank you

Randall Fox
!