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The google juggernaut rolls on...as I was saying about thi..

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 13, 2005 10:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20050512.html

<quote>

But what I DO know is that the Google Web Accelerator effectively
turns every user into a thin client, whether they know it or not.
Consider the obvious upshots of this. If Google adds power to its part
of the Accelerator, you don't have to add power to your end, meaning
your old PC can last longer. Part of that has to come from Google
assuming a larger role over time, taking responsibility for rendering
Flash, for example. And they'll do it. And we'll let them. At some
point, Google might even offer its own hardware device, optimized for
the Accelerator. At that point, you'll buy your PC from Google, use
Google as your ISP, surf an Internet that is really the Google cache,
be fed ads and sold content from Google servers. Its a GoogleWorld
that requires no AOL, no Microsoft, no Intel, no HP or Dell -- only
Google, cable companies, telephone companies, users, and of course
advertisers and web page producers.

</quote>

Now, I don't exactly agree with that take, because I don't think
google is dumb enough to sell end user hardware. What I *do* see that
Cringely doesn't, though, is that, if google controls all that muscle,
it will inevitably have alot of spare cycles. No need for computer
centers, anywhere, really, except where pointlessness hides behind
security classification. It's not google's biggest target by a long
shot, but utility and grid computing will be possible on a scale no
one has previously contemplated. Even the need to have the
computation close to massive amounts of data is going to go away.

If I were Sergey of Larry, I'd look under my car before starting it;
there are going to be lots of people thinking dark thoughts about
them.

RM
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 14, 2005 12:55:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I'm using the Web Accelerator right now myself on three seperate
computers. I don't care if they do know my surfing habits now, it's
actually made a slight but noticeable difference to how fast web pages
pop up, unlike any other accelerator that's been around in the past.
It's the one part of upgrading from dial-up to broadband that was
leaving me underwhelmed -- the latency of the webpages was not improved
by broadband, just the bandwidth.

Yousuf Khan
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 14, 2005 11:29:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Fri, 13 May 2005 20:55:52 -0400, Yousuf Khan <bbbl67@ezrs.com>
wrote:

>I'm using the Web Accelerator right now myself on three seperate
>computers. I don't care if they do know my surfing habits now, it's
>actually made a slight but noticeable difference to how fast web pages
>pop up, unlike any other accelerator that's been around in the past.
>It's the one part of upgrading from dial-up to broadband that was
>leaving me underwhelmed -- the latency of the webpages was not improved
>by broadband, just the bandwidth.
>
As far as privacy is concerned, the search history feature they just
introduced is much more worrisome, but it is also much more useful,
especially if you work from multiple locations.

The Web Accelerator in its current form probably isn't all that
exciting, and google has already had big enough problems to have
caused it to limit the test rather quickly.

Google is trying to do what everyone else has been trying to do ever
since Gates woke up in a sweat, realized what was going on, picked up
the red phone next to his bed, and ordered the destruction of
Netscape.

The difference from all previous attempts is that google has a viable
revenue model in addition to vision.

The PC is on its way out. The Cringely article actually discusses two
looming menaces: google and increasingly powerful game consoles. As
your comment underscores, though, how these things play out will be
determined by customer preferences. The technology only matters
insofar as it meets perceived needs. That's why I'd bet on google.
So far, they have a pretty good record of coming up with widgets that
people actually want to use.

RM
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 14, 2005 2:01:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

This could really be a boon for schools, if Google brings out, say a
word widget, or a spread sheet widget this could really hurt MS. After
your assignment is done you just save it, then your instructor has
access to the accounts and grades the papers. You could do it at home,
or at school, no more I lost my homework, my dog ate it.

Then after the course is done, its archived so if in a future class a
student copies a former students work you will have access to it
through google search. Ok this can be done now with NFS, and other
means, but if they make it simple, it could really take off, combine
that with cell phones, and wifi and it could be a show stopper for MS.


You would not need a computer running MS software, any free OS would
work since the work is done online. This could be tried in the
University level, and save tons of money, since departments would not
need to license MS software anymore.

The privacy thing could be a little scarry, but its been that way for
years, now since the mpaa is going after TV show p2p sharing things are
bad anyway.

Rthoreau
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 14, 2005 6:56:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Rthoreau wrote:
> This could really be a boon for schools, if Google brings out, say a
> word widget, or a spread sheet widget this could really hurt MS. After
> your assignment is done you just save it, then your instructor has
> access to the accounts and grades the papers. You could do it at home,
> or at school, no more I lost my homework, my dog ate it.

The Google widget ate my homework? :-)

Yousuf Khan
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 16, 2005 12:55:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

In article <1116090101.483185.58140@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
rthoreau@iwon.com says...
> This could really be a boon for schools, if Google brings out, say a
> word widget, or a spread sheet widget this could really hurt MS. After
> your assignment is done you just save it, then your instructor has
> access to the accounts and grades the papers. You could do it at home,
> or at school, no more I lost my homework, my dog ate it.

This is already being done in the schools around here, though on the
school's servers.

> Then after the course is done, its archived so if in a future class a
> student copies a former students work you will have access to it
> through google search. Ok this can be done now with NFS, and other
> means, but if they make it simple, it could really take off, combine
> that with cell phones, and wifi and it could be a show stopper for MS.

Good idea. One-click term papers. Hmm, maybe I should patent that
idea. ;-)

> You would not need a computer running MS software, any free OS would
> work since the work is done online. This could be tried in the
> University level, and save tons of money, since departments would not
> need to license MS software anymore.

Oh, my! We can't have this. It's *got* to be .net or Billy won't like
it.

> The privacy thing could be a little scarry, but its been that way for
> years, now since the mpaa is going after TV show p2p sharing things are
> bad anyway.

MPAA has court orders, no?

--
Keith
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 16, 2005 2:51:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Keith R. Williams wrote:
> In article <1116090101.483185.58140@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> rthoreau@iwon.com says...
><snip>
>
> This is already being done in the schools around here, though on the
> school's servers.
>
> > Then after the course is done, its archived so if in a future class
a
> > student copies a former students work you will have access to it
> > through google search. Ok this can be done now with NFS, and other
> > means, but if they make it simple, it could really take off,
combine
> > that with cell phones, and wifi and it could be a show stopper for
MS.
>
> Good idea. One-click term papers. Hmm, maybe I should patent that
> idea. ;-)
>
> > You would not need a computer running MS software, any free OS
would
> > work since the work is done online. This could be tried in the
> > University level, and save tons of money, since departments would
not
> > need to license MS software anymore.
>
> Oh, my! We can't have this. It's *got* to be .net or Billy won't
like
> it.
>
> > The privacy thing could be a little scarry, but its been that way
for
> > years, now since the mpaa is going after TV show p2p sharing things
are
> > bad anyway.
>
> MPAA has court orders, no?
>
> --
> Keith

Thats the scarry part;the MPAA is using the court system to futher its
demands. Now they are lobbying for the broadcast flag in congress. What
I don't understand is if the broadcast is over the air, how are they
legally going to enforce copyright enfringement. Are we going to see
eula's at the start of shows? This is going to get real messy. Google
already has a pretty cool video image search function,
http://video.google.com I wonder if they are enfringing on anyones
copyright by listing these.

Rthoreau
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 17, 2005 12:28:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Rthoreau <rthoreau@iwon.com> wrote:
> Thats the scarry part;the MPAA is using the court system
> to futher its demands.

Well, they would say they are using the court system to
enforce their rights to copyrighted material.

> Now they are lobbying for the broadcast flag in congress.

Which will be a bit of a battle since the US Court of
Appeals said that the FCC couldn't sneak it in the back door.
This will have to be fought as copyright extention.

> What I don't understand is if the broadcast is over the air,
> how are they legally going to enforce copyright enfringement.

FCC regulation (made legal) that all devices honor
the broadcast flag would be the principal method of enforcement.

> Are we going to see eula's at the start of shows?

Not needed. They already have the needed copright notices.

> This is going to get real messy.

Not that quickly. MPPA members sell their wares around
$0.0025/megabyte. RIAA sell around $1.50/megabyte [effective].
_Much_ bigger problem for the RIAA. ISPs can barely tolerate
MP3 traffic. They won't MPEG2 or MPEG4 because they still
pay around $1/GB for traffic.

> Google already has a pretty cool video image search function,
> http://video.google.com I wonder if they are enfringing on
> anyones copyright by listing these.

Possibly, depending on how you interpret the Napster decision.
They are facilitating some copyright infringment. They would
also be protected because there are substantial non-infringing uses.
The people hosting vidfiles may well be infringing copyright.

-- Robert
May 20, 2005 2:10:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Mon, 16 May 2005 10:51:01 -0700, Rthoreau wrote:

>
> Keith R. Williams wrote:
>> In article <1116090101.483185.58140@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>> rthoreau@iwon.com says...
>><snip>
>>
>> This is already being done in the schools around here, though on the
>> school's servers.
>>
>> > Then after the course is done, its archived so if in a future class
> a
>> > student copies a former students work you will have access to it
>> > through google search. Ok this can be done now with NFS, and other
>> > means, but if they make it simple, it could really take off,
> combine
>> > that with cell phones, and wifi and it could be a show stopper for
> MS.
>>
>> Good idea. One-click term papers. Hmm, maybe I should patent that
>> idea. ;-)
>>
>> > You would not need a computer running MS software, any free OS
> would
>> > work since the work is done online. This could be tried in the
>> > University level, and save tons of money, since departments would
> not
>> > need to license MS software anymore.
>>
>> Oh, my! We can't have this. It's *got* to be .net or Billy won't
> like
>> it.
>>
>> > The privacy thing could be a little scarry, but its been that way
> for
>> > years, now since the mpaa is going after TV show p2p sharing things
> are
>> > bad anyway.
>>
>> MPAA has court orders, no?
>>
>> --
>> Keith
>
> Thats the scarry part;the MPAA is using the court system to futher its
> demands.

Wrong! The courts have always been available to those trying to protect
their property. Just because *you're* stealing something as ephemeral as
bits, doesn't mean it's anything less then stealing.

> Now they are lobbying for the broadcast flag in congress. What
> I don't understand is if the broadcast is over the air, how are they
> legally going to enforce copyright enfringement.

The same way it's done now. You don't think HBO pays nothing to the
copyright owners to show a movie, do you?

> Are we going to see
> eula's at the start of shows? This is going to get real messy.

You really need to take a civics class. They already own the property.

> Google
> already has a pretty cool video image search function,
> http://video.google.com I wonder if they are enfringing on anyones
> copyright by listing these.

THere is a concept of "fair use". I don't know whether what you're
talking about is in violation of that or not. Indeed that's what the
courts do. If you're stealing, you deserve to pay. ...and that's the
bottom line.

--
Keith
!