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Bypass IBM T30 password it is lock out

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2005 10:55:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Hello,
I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets ! I am going to tell the
truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
out?? Let me know !
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 5:41:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 6 Aug 2005 18:55:00 -0700, SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com wrote:

>Hello,
> I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets !

LOL.. Yeah, I saw one of those too.. some guy selling it "almost-new"
out of the back of a van, great bargain too! :>

> I am going to tell the
>truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
>computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
>there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
>the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
>out?? Let me know !

Unplug it, remove the battery and open it up. Find the CMOS battery
and remove it. Press the power button a few times, then leave it for
half an hour. Put everything back together and your power-on password
should be cleared.

Alternatively check on IBM's website for documentation on how to
remove a power-on password. Note that this is a security mechanism
designed to prevent people from getting data off of stolen laptops, so
sometimes it's a bit more complicated than the above. Also note that
taking apart a laptop is not a 5-minute project. Take rather careful
notice of where all the parts are.

As a side note here, if/when you do get the power-on password cleared,
I would HIGHLY recommend that you reformat the hard drive before doing
much of anything else. Whether you know it or not, there's a VERY
high probability that this laptop you purchased was stolen. If you
leave the original OS on it and connect up to the internet there may
be some sort of software installed on there which could start raising
some suspicions (ie software that automatically tries to connect to
the previous-owners corporate computer network).

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 3:06:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 01:41:42 -0400, Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
wrote:

>On 6 Aug 2005 18:55:00 -0700, SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com wrote:
>
>>Hello,
>> I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets !
>
>LOL.. Yeah, I saw one of those too.. some guy selling it "almost-new"
>out of the back of a van, great bargain too! :>
>
>> I am going to tell the
>>truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
>>computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
>>there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
>>the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
>>out?? Let me know !
>
>Unplug it, remove the battery and open it up. Find the CMOS battery
>and remove it. Press the power button a few times, then leave it for
>half an hour. Put everything back together and your power-on password
>should be cleared.
>
[snipped]

Not likely. ThinkPads use an eeprom mounted on the motherboard; bios, hard
disk and/or supervisor passwords aren't going to go away, ever. And if you
think erasing the eeprom will help, you'll be the proud owner of a doorstop.

This guy can help for a quite reasonable fee, but requires one to be handy
with a soldering iron (or know someone who is) as you have to cobble together
a null modem rs232-to-I2C convertor tool (for lack of a better name) to be
able to dump the contents of the eeprom and interpret it correctly.

I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that had
been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually caught
the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on everything.

So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop, dumped
the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back the
passwords...

http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/

cheers
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 3:17:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I just need some help !! I know that the TP might be stolen but I don't
have money to buy a laptop ! I am running a 333mhz computer right now
that I brought from a second hand store call "GoodWill" so if I have
some money I would have not brought this laptop ! but I wanted a new
computer so I have to do best with what I have ! Sorry for being a
scumbag ! but I just don't have money to buy a laptop !
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 4:11:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

"daytripper" <day_trippr@REMOVEyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:0c7cf19glf9m6s761543v8f2ut9b5hv6g0@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 01:41:42 -0400, Tony Hill
> <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
> wrote:
>
>>On 6 Aug 2005 18:55:00 -0700, SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com wrote:
>>
>>>Hello,
>>> I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets !
>>
>>LOL.. Yeah, I saw one of those too.. some guy selling it "almost-new"
>>out of the back of a van, great bargain too! :>
>>
>>> I am going to tell the
>>>truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
>>>computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
>>>there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
>>>the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
>>>out?? Let me know !
>>
>>Unplug it, remove the battery and open it up. Find the CMOS battery
>>and remove it. Press the power button a few times, then leave it for
>>half an hour. Put everything back together and your power-on password
>>should be cleared.
>>
> [snipped]
>
> Not likely. ThinkPads use an eeprom mounted on the motherboard; bios,
> hard
> disk and/or supervisor passwords aren't going to go away, ever. And if
> you
> think erasing the eeprom will help, you'll be the proud owner of a
> doorstop.
>
> This guy can help for a quite reasonable fee, but requires one to be
> handy
> with a soldering iron (or know someone who is) as you have to cobble
> together
> a null modem rs232-to-I2C convertor tool (for lack of a better name) to
> be
> able to dump the contents of the eeprom and interpret it correctly.
>
> I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
> had
> been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
> caught
> the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
> everything.
>
> So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
> dumped
> the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
> the
> passwords...
>
> http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>
> cheers

And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
property is?
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 5:37:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com writes:

> Hello,
> I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets ! I am going to tell the
> truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
> computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
> there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
> the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
> out?? Let me know !

See if you can find the owner to return it to them, and maybe they'll
give you a reward that'll make up for what you paid for it?
--
Joseph J. Pfeiffer, Jr., Ph.D. Phone -- (505) 646-1605
Department of Computer Science FAX -- (505) 646-1002
New Mexico State University http://www.cs.nmsu.edu/~pfeiffer
skype: jjpfeifferjr
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 5:52:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi" <dcecchi.nospam@att.net>
wrote:

>
>"daytripper" <day_trippr@REMOVEyahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:0c7cf19glf9m6s761543v8f2ut9b5hv6g0@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 01:41:42 -0400, Tony Hill
>> <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>On 6 Aug 2005 18:55:00 -0700, SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hello,
>>>> I just a brought a IBM T30 off the streets !
>>>
>>>LOL.. Yeah, I saw one of those too.. some guy selling it "almost-new"
>>>out of the back of a van, great bargain too! :>
>>>
>>>> I am going to tell the
>>>>truths ! I am not going to make anything up! Well, when I boot up the
>>>>computer it is lock! It show a symbol of a computer and a lock. Is
>>>>there a way to go around this and bypass the password so I can login??
>>>>the Thinkpad looks very good so I am wondering if someone can help me
>>>>out?? Let me know !
>>>
>>>Unplug it, remove the battery and open it up. Find the CMOS battery
>>>and remove it. Press the power button a few times, then leave it for
>>>half an hour. Put everything back together and your power-on password
>>>should be cleared.
>>>
>> [snipped]
>>
>> Not likely. ThinkPads use an eeprom mounted on the motherboard; bios,
>> hard
>> disk and/or supervisor passwords aren't going to go away, ever. And if
>> you
>> think erasing the eeprom will help, you'll be the proud owner of a
>> doorstop.
>>
>> This guy can help for a quite reasonable fee, but requires one to be
>> handy
>> with a soldering iron (or know someone who is) as you have to cobble
>> together
>> a null modem rs232-to-I2C convertor tool (for lack of a better name) to
>> be
>> able to dump the contents of the eeprom and interpret it correctly.
>>
>> I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
>> had
>> been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
>> caught
>> the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
>> everything.
>>
>> So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
>> dumped
>> the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
>> the
>> passwords...
>>
>> http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>>
>> cheers
>
>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>property is?

To illustrate just how screwed this guy is if he doesn't have the skill set to
perform an actual resurrection?

Otherwise, it only took a few minutes to Google up that site back when I
needed it....and the reality is nothing I said or didn't say would see that
laptop back to its rightful owner...the deed is long done...
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 10:32:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

<SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1123438649.321224.168100@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>I just need some help !! I know that the TP might be stolen but I don't
> have money to buy a laptop ! I am running a 333mhz computer right now
> that I brought from a second hand store call "GoodWill" so if I have
> some money I would have not brought this laptop ! but I wanted a new
> computer so I have to do best with what I have ! Sorry for being a
> scumbag ! but I just don't have money to buy a laptop !
>
Get a job. Even entry level jobs like macdonalds pay enough in a month
or so to buy a laptop. Or buy a legimate used laptop.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2005 10:44:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

daytripper wrote:
> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi" <dcecchi.nospam@att.net>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>property is?
>
>
> To illustrate just how screwed this guy is if he doesn't have the skill set to
> perform an actual resurrection?
>
> Otherwise, it only took a few minutes to Google up that site back when I
> needed it....and the reality is nothing I said or didn't say would see that
> laptop back to its rightful owner...the deed is long done...

So by that logic helping a concentration camp guard avoid capture
after WWII would be OK because "the deed is long done" ? After
all, nothing is going to bring back the dead.

Glad you don't live in my neighbourhood.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 12:06:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 18:44:06 GMT, Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote:

>daytripper wrote:
>> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi" <dcecchi.nospam@att.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>>property is?
>>
>>
>> To illustrate just how screwed this guy is if he doesn't have the skill set to
>> perform an actual resurrection?
>>
>> Otherwise, it only took a few minutes to Google up that site back when I
>> needed it....and the reality is nothing I said or didn't say would see that
>> laptop back to its rightful owner...the deed is long done...
>
>So by that logic helping a concentration camp guard avoid capture
>after WWII would be OK because "the deed is long done" ? After
>all, nothing is going to bring back the dead.
>
>Glad you don't live in my neighbourhood.

Sheesh, you nitwits will drive a thousand miles just to make a weak point?

Get over it...or don't....I couldn't care less...life goes on with or without
you....
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 7:53:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi"
<dcecchi.nospam@att.net> wrote:
>> I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
>> had
>> been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
>> caught
>> the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
>> everything.
>>
>> So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
>> dumped
>> the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
>> the
>> passwords...
>>
>> http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>>
>> cheers
>
>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>property is?


I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop, in fact
he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer shop and he's
probably telling the truth. There are LOTS of sketchy stores around
(even some that look legit) which will pay money for a stolen laptop
which they then resell to the an unsuspecting customer who just thinks
that they are getting a bargain. Buyer beware I suppose, but I doubt
that is much consolation to the original poster who got screwed over
with a laptop that is pretty much unusable.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 4:46:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote:
> I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop,
> in fact he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer
> shop and he's probably telling the truth. There are LOTS of
> sketchy stores around (even some that look legit) which will
> pay money for a stolen laptop which they then resell to the an
> unsuspecting customer who just thinks that they are getting
> a bargain. Buyer beware I suppose, but I doubt that is much
> consolation to the original poster who got screwed over with
> a laptop that is pretty much unusable.

Even beyond that, the laptop could be perfectly legal, unstolen.
Just bought at a surplus auction. Lots of corps dump old equipment,
and their surplus people often don't have the skillz to know that
passwords might be needed. Or the talent to fetch'em.

"Honi soit qui mal y pense" [Shame on those who think evil of it]

-- Robert
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 4:46:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Robert Redelmeier wrote:
> Tony Hill <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote:
>
>>I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop,
>>in fact he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer
>>shop and he's probably telling the truth. There are LOTS of
>>sketchy stores around (even some that look legit) which will
>>pay money for a stolen laptop which they then resell to the an
>>unsuspecting customer who just thinks that they are getting
>>a bargain. Buyer beware I suppose, but I doubt that is much
>>consolation to the original poster who got screwed over with
>>a laptop that is pretty much unusable.
>
>
> Even beyond that, the laptop could be perfectly legal, unstolen.
> Just bought at a surplus auction. Lots of corps dump old equipment,
> and their surplus people often don't have the skillz to know that
> passwords might be needed. Or the talent to fetch'em.
>
> "Honi soit qui mal y pense" [Shame on those who think evil of it]
>
> -- Robert
>
The following quotes might allay your concerns "I just a brought a IBM
T30 off the streets" and "I know that the TP might be stolen" both from
the original poster

--
Del Cecchi
"This post is my own and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions,
strategies or opinions.”
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 7:21:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Tony Hill wrote:
> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi"
> <dcecchi.nospam@att.net> wrote:
>
>>>I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
>>>had
>>>been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
>>>caught
>>>the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
>>>everything.
>>>
>>>So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
>>>dumped
>>>the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
>>>the
>>>passwords...
>>>
>>>http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>>>
>>>cheers
>>
>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>property is?
>
>
>
> I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop, in fact
> he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer shop and he's
> probably telling the truth.

He did *not* say that. He said "I just a brought a IBM T30 off
the streets ! "

More importantly, "Daytripper" conceded the point that the laptop
was stolen when he answered the question above with
"...the reality is nothing I said or didn't say
would see that laptop back to its rightful
owner...the deed is long done..."

It is quite clear that he thinks it is OK to help someone who
buys stolen property. Don't know about down south, but in Canada
aiding a felon is in itself a felony.


> There are LOTS of sketchy stores around
> (even some that look legit) which will pay money for a stolen laptop
> which they then resell to the an unsuspecting customer who just thinks
> that they are getting a bargain. Buyer beware I suppose, but I doubt
> that is much consolation to the original poster who got screwed over
> with a laptop that is pretty much unusable.
>
> -------------
> Tony Hill
> hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2005 8:56:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:21:58 GMT, Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote:

>Tony Hill wrote:
>> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi"
>> <dcecchi.nospam@att.net> wrote:
>>
>>>>I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
>>>>had
>>>>been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
>>>>caught
>>>>the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
>>>>everything.
>>>>
>>>>So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
>>>>dumped
>>>>the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
>>>>the
>>>>passwords...
>>>>
>>>>http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>>>>
>>>>cheers
>>>
>>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>>property is?
>>
>>
>>
>> I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop, in fact
>> he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer shop and he's
>> probably telling the truth.
>
>He did *not* say that. He said "I just a brought a IBM T30 off
>the streets ! "

In his 2nd post, said he brought[sic] it from a second hand store called
Goodwill. Is that any different from say E-Bay?

>More importantly, "Daytripper" conceded the point that the laptop
>was stolen when he answered the question above with
> "...the reality is nothing I said or didn't say
> would see that laptop back to its rightful
> owner...the deed is long done..."

Oh come on - I didn't read that as conceding any more than the
*possibility* it was stolen

>It is quite clear that he thinks it is OK to help someone who
>buys stolen property. Don't know about down south, but in Canada
>aiding a felon is in itself a felony.

Lots of us may have bought stolen property without knowing for sure. I'm
not sure of the law but I tend to think a decision is going to depend on
"knowledge", prior or after the fact... or collaboration.

--
Rgds, George Macdonald
August 9, 2005 6:33:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 16:56:13 -0400, George Macdonald
<fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:21:58 GMT, Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote:
>
>>Tony Hill wrote:
>>> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi"
>>> <dcecchi.nospam@att.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>>>I was that someone for my sister after she recovered the ThinkPad that
>>>>>had
>>>>>been stolen from her while she was in the hospital. The cops eventually
>>>>>caught
>>>>>the bastid and recovered the TP, but he'd enabled passwords on
>>>>>everything.
>>>>>
>>>>>So I built the convertor, ran this guy's application on my own laptop,
>>>>>dumped
>>>>>the eeprom and sent the dump file to the guy, and he emailed me back
>>>>>the
>>>>>passwords...
>>>>>
>>>>>http://www.ja.axxs.net/unlock/
>>>>>
>>>>>cheers
>>>>
>>>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>>>property is?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I doubt that the original poster actually *stole* the laptop, in fact
>>> he said that he bought it from a second-hand computer shop and he's
>>> probably telling the truth.
>>
>>He did *not* say that. He said "I just a brought a IBM T30 off
>>the streets ! "
>
>In his 2nd post, said he brought[sic] it from a second hand store called
>Goodwill. Is that any different from say E-Bay?
>
>>More importantly, "Daytripper" conceded the point that the laptop
>>was stolen when he answered the question above with
>> "...the reality is nothing I said or didn't say
>> would see that laptop back to its rightful
>> owner...the deed is long done..."
>
>Oh come on - I didn't read that as conceding any more than the
>*possibility* it was stolen
>
>>It is quite clear that he thinks it is OK to help someone who
>>buys stolen property. Don't know about down south, but in Canada
>>aiding a felon is in itself a felony.
>
>Lots of us may have bought stolen property without knowing for sure. I'm
>not sure of the law but I tend to think a decision is going to depend on
>"knowledge", prior or after the fact... or collaboration.

THOU SHALT NOT STEAL
IMHO, this includes, but is not limited to, aiding and abetting the
thieves by means of buying stolen property from them.
August 9, 2005 9:58:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 18:44:06 GMT Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote in
Message id: <WDsJe.135393$s54.58050@pd7tw2no>:

>daytripper wrote:
>> On Sun, 7 Aug 2005 12:11:15 -0500, "Del Cecchi" <dcecchi.nospam@att.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>And the reason you are helping some jerk that admits to buying stolen
>>>property is?
>>
>>
>> To illustrate just how screwed this guy is if he doesn't have the skill set to
>> perform an actual resurrection?
>>
>> Otherwise, it only took a few minutes to Google up that site back when I
>> needed it....and the reality is nothing I said or didn't say would see that
>> laptop back to its rightful owner...the deed is long done...
>
>So by that logic helping a concentration camp guard avoid capture
>after WWII would be OK because "the deed is long done" ? After
>all, nothing is going to bring back the dead.
>
>Glad you don't live in my neighbourhood.

<rolls eyes>

Sheesh. Didn't take long for *that* Godwin, did it?
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 9, 2005 1:43:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

SiRkNiGhT115@hotmail.com wrote:

>I just need some help !! I know that the TP might be stolen but I don't
>have money to buy a laptop ! I am running a 333mhz computer right now
>that I brought from a second hand store call "GoodWill" so if I have
>some money I would have not brought this laptop ! but I wanted a new
>computer so I have to do best with what I have ! Sorry for being a
>scumbag ! but I just don't have money to buy a laptop !

Oh, well that changes everything. Sheesh.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 9, 2005 8:08:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 16:29:36 -0500, Del Cecchi <cecchinospam@us.ibm.com>
wrote:

>George Macdonald wrote:
>> On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:21:58 GMT, Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote:

>>>It is quite clear that he thinks it is OK to help someone who
>>>buys stolen property. Don't know about down south, but in Canada
>>>aiding a felon is in itself a felony.
>>
>>
>> Lots of us may have bought stolen property without knowing for sure. I'm
>> not sure of the law but I tend to think a decision is going to depend on
>> "knowledge", prior or after the fact... or collaboration.
>>
>Around here "possession of stolen property" is a crime. It doesn't say
>you had to know with certainty it was stolen. Have you no ethics?

No ethics? That's a bit strong. What is it you're upset about: the
potential of theft or the method for cracking an IBM Tninkpad password?
I'm more pissed because IBM has been hiding this relatively simple password
reset and according to their docs does not use it themsleves, preferring to
put a perfectly good system board in the garbage.

As for *my* ethics they're a bloody sight higher than the guys who make up
the rules.

>"buy this thinkpad... It fell off a truck"

Can you say with absolute certainty that you have no such thing among your
possessions? Stuff re-enters the retail chain all the time - the police
are utterly useless here. Even when they know who stole your things, they
won't lift a hand.

--
Rgds, George Macdonald
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 9, 2005 8:47:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

George Macdonald wrote:
> On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 16:29:36 -0500, Del Cecchi <cecchinospam@us.ibm.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>George Macdonald wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:21:58 GMT, Rob Stow <rob.stow@shaw.ca> wrote:
>
>
>>>>It is quite clear that he thinks it is OK to help someone who
>>>>buys stolen property. Don't know about down south, but in Canada
>>>>aiding a felon is in itself a felony.
>>>
>>>
>>>Lots of us may have bought stolen property without knowing for sure. I'm
>>>not sure of the law but I tend to think a decision is going to depend on
>>>"knowledge", prior or after the fact... or collaboration.
>>>
>>
>>Around here "possession of stolen property" is a crime. It doesn't say
>>you had to know with certainty it was stolen. Have you no ethics?
>
>
> No ethics? That's a bit strong. What is it you're upset about: the
> potential of theft or the method for cracking an IBM Tninkpad password?
> I'm more pissed because IBM has been hiding this relatively simple password
> reset and according to their docs does not use it themsleves, preferring to
> put a perfectly good system board in the garbage.
>
> As for *my* ethics they're a bloody sight higher than the guys who make up
> the rules.
>
>
>>"buy this thinkpad... It fell off a truck"
>
>
> Can you say with absolute certainty that you have no such thing among your
> possessions? Stuff re-enters the retail chain all the time - the police
> are utterly useless here. Even when they know who stole your things, they
> won't lift a hand.
>

Absolute certainty? Clearly not. This (hypothetical) case (the guy was
a troll making up stories) was far from buying something that
conceivably was stolen. He bought something on the street that he had
good reason to believe was stolen. And someone, knowing that,
obligingly trotted out a solution to make it usable. I realize that
security through obscurity is not the best method, but that is no excuse
to point out the vulnerabilty.

But you can do what you want. Publish the neighbors credit card and ssn
info if you happen to find it out. Suit yourself.

--
Del Cecchi
"This post is my own and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions,
strategies or opinions.”
!