X:Y ratios vary?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

I just noticed that all of the common monitor resolutions have an x:y
ratio of 1.33:1 except for 1280 x 1024, which is 1.25:1.

Does anyone know why this one is different?

Does this mean that images are slightly distorted at 1280x1024 as
compared to the other resolutions?

--
For email, use Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
4 answers Last reply
More about ratios vary
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > Does this mean that images are slightly distorted at 1280x1024 as
    > compared to the other resolutions?

    There are two factors that contribute to this.. aspect ratio of the display
    device "viewable area", and aspect ratio of pixelsize. Pixels are square in
    320x240, 512x384, 640x480, 800x600, 1024x768 and so forth when the display
    device viewable area is 4:3 (such as "typical" CRT monitor).

    1280x1024 TFT monitors have square pixels, so the display viewable area is
    5:4, not 4:3.. the difference is very small.. 1280x960 would have square
    pixels on 4:3 display .. the 2D display software such as picture viewers,
    web browsers, anything could measure these things and take them into
    consideration when "painting" the image. However, this would require
    correction in either vertical or horizontal dimension and this would either
    cost image quality or performance. It is efficient to assume that pixels are
    square in 2D software which are not "mission critical" for such issues.

    For 3D graphics the aspect ratio correction is "free", because it can be
    embedded into the graphics pipeline when doing perspective or
    map-to-viewport transformation. Perspective transformation is very commonly
    used place where this correction is implemented in.

    When doing the aspect ratio correction THREE factors step into effect:

    1. display device viewable area (4:3, 16:9, 5:4, ...) aspect ratio
    2. pixel size aspect ratio (1.0 is VERY common)
    3. window or viewport aspect ratio (varies radically)

    Regarding 1280x1024 vs. 1280x960 the ratio change is small, only ~6%, unless
    this is taken into consideration, yes, there will be distortion. But this
    case would assume pixels don't map 1:1 from source to destination when
    blitting, displaying, whatever.. if the image is copied 1:1, then pixels
    will still be square and ergo, no distortion. However, if 4:3 image is
    *stretched* to fill 5:4 area completely, then, yes, there will be 6%
    distortion.

    So it's completely up to the software if there is "distortion" or not,
    atleast the pixels are square on a 1280x1024 5:4 display. I'm not 100%
    certain if I answered the right question, so be more specific if I avoided
    the issue somehow. :)
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    As a practical matter, the difference is not readily noticeable on the
    screen during viewing.

    --
    DaveW


    "Top Spin" <ToppSpin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7e1p8094pedjqvgupprsq5aqm1dmh075do@4ax.com...
    > I just noticed that all of the common monitor resolutions have an x:y
    > ratio of 1.33:1 except for 1280 x 1024, which is 1.25:1.
    >
    > Does anyone know why this one is different?
    >
    > Does this mean that images are slightly distorted at 1280x1024 as
    > compared to the other resolutions?
    >
    > --
    > For email, use Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Top Spin" <ToppSpin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7e1p8094pedjqvgupprsq5aqm1dmh075do@4ax.com...
    > I just noticed that all of the common monitor resolutions have an x:y
    > ratio of 1.33:1 except for 1280 x 1024, which is 1.25:1.
    >
    > Does anyone know why this one is different?
    >
    > Does this mean that images are slightly distorted at 1280x1024 as
    > compared to the other resolutions?

    This is called the "aspect ratio" of the display. 1.33:1, also
    referred to as "4:3," is, as you noted, the standard, and comes
    from the standard TV aspect ratio. 1280 x 1024 is the lone
    exception to this, at 1.25:1 (or 5:4) and comes from the early
    days of computing when high-end workstations used this format
    for reasons of memory organization.

    The images are not distorted on a 5:4 display unless you're
    trying to scale a 4:3 image (say, 1024 x 768) to fit the 5:4
    full-screen. Normally in both the 4:3 and 5:4 cases, the pixel pitch
    is "square," so operating in that mode throughout results in
    no geometric distortion. You would only need to worry about
    this if you buy a 1280 x 1024 LCD, but plan on regularly driving
    it with some other input mode such as 1024 x 768.

    Bob M.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 00:50:40 GMT, "Bob Myers"
    <nospamplease@address.invalid> wrote:

    >"Top Spin" <ToppSpin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:7e1p8094pedjqvgupprsq5aqm1dmh075do@4ax.com...
    >> I just noticed that all of the common monitor resolutions have an x:y
    >> ratio of 1.33:1 except for 1280 x 1024, which is 1.25:1.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know why this one is different?
    >>
    >> Does this mean that images are slightly distorted at 1280x1024 as
    >> compared to the other resolutions?
    >
    >This is called the "aspect ratio" of the display. 1.33:1, also
    >referred to as "4:3," is, as you noted, the standard, and comes
    >from the standard TV aspect ratio. 1280 x 1024 is the lone
    >exception to this, at 1.25:1 (or 5:4) and comes from the early
    >days of computing when high-end workstations used this format
    >for reasons of memory organization.
    >
    >The images are not distorted on a 5:4 display unless you're
    >trying to scale a 4:3 image (say, 1024 x 768) to fit the 5:4
    >full-screen. Normally in both the 4:3 and 5:4 cases, the pixel pitch
    >is "square," so operating in that mode throughout results in
    >no geometric distortion. You would only need to worry about
    >this if you buy a 1280 x 1024 LCD, but plan on regularly driving
    >it with some other input mode such as 1024 x 768.

    Got it, thanks.

    --
    For email, use Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
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