Pinnacle Studio 9 with MovieBoxDV

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

I want to burn my VHS home movies to DVD.

As a first step, yesterday, I purchased, from Fryes, a reconditioned:
Pinnacle Studio MovieBox DV (Movie Box DV hardware & Studio 9 software
for $245 US dollars + California sales tax of 8.25%.

a) I correctly wired the 3 VHS VCR RCA outputs to the Pinnacle MovieBoxDV
white-red-yellow composite analog video input port; and I correctly
wired the Pinnacle MovieBox DV output 6-pin-to-4-pin firewire to the
WinXP laptop's firewire input port.
b) I inserted a VHS home video tape & pressed the PLAY button on the VCR
(having tested with a TV that the VCR was outputting the desired movie).
c) Windowx XP automatically started Pinnacle Studio version 9 on my
IBM A31p laptop when I plugged in the 4-pin firewire connection.

Yet, after three hours of testing & reading the manual, absolutely
nothing shows in the Pinnacle Studio version 9 preview pane!

Despite the frustrating error message (see below):
- "Setup->Capture Source" is set to "Capture devices":
Video = MovieBox DV Analog
Audio = MovieBox DV Analog
TV Standard = NTSC
Aspect Ratio = 4.3
Drive C Read Data Rate = 13049 Kbyte/sec
Drive C Write Data Rate = 10935 Kbyte/sec
Capture Format = MPEG preset @ High quality (DVD)

Still I get the (contrarian) frustratingly insipid error message below,
despite the fact I've repeatedly checked all connections, set the
"Diskometer" to "Composite" and "S-Video" back & forth numerous times
(leaving it on "Composite" where it belongs for copying VHS tape to disk).

Still, I get the production stopping Pinnacle Studio version 9 error:

Capture Device Initialization Error:
Pinnacle Studio is trying to initialuze a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder
via a 1394 port.

If you are trying to capture analog video:
1. Click on Setup->Capture Source and select the correct video capture device.
2. Open the left hand panel on the Diskometer (capture controller.) and set
the correctd analog video input port (Composite or S-Video).

If you are trying to capture from a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder:
1. Make sure our camcorder is turned on, is in VTR/VCR/Play mode, and is
connected to the 1394 port on the computer.

Any ideas why Pinnacle Studio 9 insists on seeing a digital device on the
firewire instead of its own MovieBoxDV hardware (supplied with the software)?

Yes, I registered the product & activated the MPEG-2 codec unlock by
obtaining an activation key from the Pinnacle Studios site & entering
it into the form Help->Enter Activation Key.

Since the unit was reconditioned by Fryes, do you think it's busted (I have
only 15 days plus this has software so I don't know if there's a restocking
fee). I'd rather the darn thing just work.

Is anyone successful on an IBM A31p laptop with recording from VHS to the
laptop using Pinnacle Studio version 9 & the Pinnacle MovieBox DV unit?
Have you seen this annoyingly frustrating problem before?

Orak Listalavostok
16 answers Last reply
More about pinnacle studio movieboxdv
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

    oraklistal@yahoo.com (Orak Listalavostok) wrote in
    news:44d113e9.0406030843.c37f12d@posting.google.com:

    > I want to burn my VHS home movies to DVD.
    >
    > As a first step, yesterday, I purchased, from Fryes, a
    > reconditioned:
    > Pinnacle Studio MovieBox DV (Movie Box DV hardware & Studio 9
    > software
    > for $245 US dollars + California sales tax of 8.25%.
    >
    > a) I correctly wired the 3 VHS VCR RCA outputs to the Pinnacle
    > MovieBoxDV
    > white-red-yellow composite analog video input port; and I
    > correctly wired the Pinnacle MovieBox DV output 6-pin-to-4-pin
    > firewire to the WinXP laptop's firewire input port.
    > b) I inserted a VHS home video tape & pressed the PLAY button on
    > the VCR
    > (having tested with a TV that the VCR was outputting the
    > desired movie).
    > c) Windowx XP automatically started Pinnacle Studio version 9 on
    > my
    > IBM A31p laptop when I plugged in the 4-pin firewire
    > connection.
    >
    > Yet, after three hours of testing & reading the manual, absolutely
    > nothing shows in the Pinnacle Studio version 9 preview pane!
    >
    > Despite the frustrating error message (see below):
    > - "Setup->Capture Source" is set to "Capture devices":
    > Video = MovieBox DV Analog
    > Audio = MovieBox DV Analog
    > TV Standard = NTSC
    > Aspect Ratio = 4.3
    > Drive C Read Data Rate = 13049 Kbyte/sec
    > Drive C Write Data Rate = 10935 Kbyte/sec
    > Capture Format = MPEG preset @ High quality (DVD)
    >
    > Still I get the (contrarian) frustratingly insipid error message
    > below, despite the fact I've repeatedly checked all connections,
    > set the "Diskometer" to "Composite" and "S-Video" back & forth
    > numerous times (leaving it on "Composite" where it belongs for
    > copying VHS tape to disk).
    >
    > Still, I get the production stopping Pinnacle Studio version 9
    > error:
    >
    > Capture Device Initialization Error:
    > Pinnacle Studio is trying to initialuze a DV or Digital 8
    > Camcorder via a 1394 port.
    >
    > If you are trying to capture analog video:
    > 1. Click on Setup->Capture Source and select the correct video
    > capture device. 2. Open the left hand panel on the Diskometer
    > (capture controller.) and set
    > the correctd analog video input port (Composite or S-Video).
    >
    > If you are trying to capture from a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder:
    > 1. Make sure our camcorder is turned on, is in VTR/VCR/Play mode,
    > and is
    > connected to the 1394 port on the computer.
    >
    > Any ideas why Pinnacle Studio 9 insists on seeing a digital device
    > on the firewire instead of its own MovieBoxDV hardware (supplied
    > with the software)?
    >
    > Yes, I registered the product & activated the MPEG-2 codec unlock
    > by obtaining an activation key from the Pinnacle Studios site &
    > entering it into the form Help->Enter Activation Key.
    >
    > Since the unit was reconditioned by Fryes, do you think it's
    > busted (I have only 15 days plus this has software so I don't know
    > if there's a restocking fee). I'd rather the darn thing just work.
    >
    > Is anyone successful on an IBM A31p laptop with recording from VHS
    > to the laptop using Pinnacle Studio version 9 & the Pinnacle
    > MovieBox DV unit? Have you seen this annoyingly frustrating
    > problem before?
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok
    >

    Are you sure Fry's reconditioned it, or did they just stick the
    little label onto the box?

    I'm also guessing here that there may still be a setting well-hidden
    somewhere in the Pinnacle software about controlling/not controlling
    the camcorder. Since you're not using a camcorder, you would want
    that off.

    You could also try downloading the demo version of Scenalyzer Live,
    to see if the problem is in the Pinnacle capture S/W. ScLive is
    robust, turning off camcorder control is really easy in it, and it's
    fairly cheap if you decide to get it (like around $35). There are
    also other capture programs, even some free ones, I think.

    Good luck,
    Gino

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Gino) phone 650.966.8481
    Call me letters find me at domain blochg whose dot is com
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

    Orak,

    I assume the Movie Box DV is designed to take your VHS signal, convert
    it to DV and send it to your computer via your Firewire connector.

    If this is the case, you have almost everything set up wrong.

    First, read the manual and follow the diagrams on how to set up your
    hardware and then Studio 9. You have the proper cables going from
    your VCR to the Movie box, then the DV signal going to your computer.
    If the Movie box is converting the VHS composite and audio signals to
    DV, then your computer will see a DV "camcorder" attached to the
    Firewire input. HOWEVER, it will be the equivalent of a
    non-controllable DV device, such as a Digital 8 Camcorder, or any
    other analog to DV converter.

    THEREFORE, you must set Studio 9 to capture DV without device control.
    Again, read the manual and it will tell you how to use the SETUP menus
    and then switch to the Capture window. Since you will not have device
    control, you will have to start and stop your VCR by hand. Cue your
    tape to a few seconds BEFORE where you want to capture, so that you
    have a signal coming into your computer/Studio, then click Start
    Capture in Studio (You'll have to give your capture a name unless you
    want it named Video 1, or whatever is the default in Studio 9, then
    click OK and start capturing.

    BUT AGAIN, it the Movie box is actually converting your signal to DV,
    you will need to capture to DV and convert to MPG (if that is what
    you want) unless you want to try and convert to MPG on the fly, which
    is not recommended.

    If you really want to capture in MPG, you should take the Movie box DV
    back and get a hardware VHS to MPG converter, which will probably
    connect to your computer through a USB1 (bad) or 2 (better) connector.

    Finally, go to the Pinnacle Studio 9 webboard and seek additional
    help, after you've read the manual.

    Hope this helps,

    Susan

    PS, the "recommendation" from Fry's was that you give them money, not
    that the Pinnacle was recommended.

    oraklistal@yahoo.com (Orak Listalavostok) wrote:

    >I want to burn my VHS home movies to DVD.
    >
    >As a first step, yesterday, I purchased, from Fryes, a reconditioned:
    > Pinnacle Studio MovieBox DV (Movie Box DV hardware & Studio 9 software
    >for $245 US dollars + California sales tax of 8.25%.
    >
    >a) I correctly wired the 3 VHS VCR RCA outputs to the Pinnacle MovieBoxDV
    > white-red-yellow composite analog video input port; and I correctly
    > wired the Pinnacle MovieBox DV output 6-pin-to-4-pin firewire to the
    > WinXP laptop's firewire input port.
    >b) I inserted a VHS home video tape & pressed the PLAY button on the VCR
    > (having tested with a TV that the VCR was outputting the desired movie).
    >c) Windowx XP automatically started Pinnacle Studio version 9 on my
    > IBM A31p laptop when I plugged in the 4-pin firewire connection.
    >
    >Yet, after three hours of testing & reading the manual, absolutely
    >nothing shows in the Pinnacle Studio version 9 preview pane!
    >
    >Despite the frustrating error message (see below):
    > - "Setup->Capture Source" is set to "Capture devices":
    > Video = MovieBox DV Analog
    > Audio = MovieBox DV Analog
    > TV Standard = NTSC
    > Aspect Ratio = 4.3
    > Drive C Read Data Rate = 13049 Kbyte/sec
    > Drive C Write Data Rate = 10935 Kbyte/sec
    > Capture Format = MPEG preset @ High quality (DVD)

    If the Movie box DV is a DV conversion device, your computer will see
    it as a DV camcorder, and that is what Studio will have to see also.

    >
    >Still I get the (contrarian) frustratingly insipid error message below,
    >despite the fact I've repeatedly checked all connections, set the
    >"Diskometer" to "Composite" and "S-Video" back & forth numerous times
    >(leaving it on "Composite" where it belongs for copying VHS tape to disk).

    Again, you are NOT trying to capture analog VHS, you are trying to
    capture a DV signal from the Movie box.
    >
    >Still, I get the production stopping Pinnacle Studio version 9 error:
    >
    > Capture Device Initialization Error:
    > Pinnacle Studio is trying to initialuze a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder
    > via a 1394 port.
    >
    > If you are trying to capture analog video:
    > 1. Click on Setup->Capture Source and select the correct video capture device.
    > 2. Open the left hand panel on the Diskometer (capture controller.) and set
    > the correctd analog video input port (Composite or S-Video).
    >
    >If you are trying to capture from a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder:
    > 1. Make sure our camcorder is turned on, is in VTR/VCR/Play mode, and is
    > connected to the 1394 port on the computer.

    Again, THIS is what you are trying to do.
    >
    >Any ideas why Pinnacle Studio 9 insists on seeing a digital device on the
    >firewire instead of its own MovieBoxDV hardware (supplied with the software)?
    >
    >Yes, I registered the product & activated the MPEG-2 codec unlock by
    >obtaining an activation key from the Pinnacle Studios site & entering
    >it into the form Help->Enter Activation Key.
    >
    >Since the unit was reconditioned by Fryes, do you think it's busted (I have
    >only 15 days plus this has software so I don't know if there's a restocking
    >fee). I'd rather the darn thing just work.
    >
    >Is anyone successful on an IBM A31p laptop with recording from VHS to the
    >laptop using Pinnacle Studio version 9 & the Pinnacle MovieBox DV unit?
    >Have you seen this annoyingly frustrating problem before?
    >
    >Orak Listalavostok
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

    "Susan" <nospam@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:e3sub01asrk5sgetvdrqgknlf6be4rql4v@4ax.com...
    > Orak,
    >
    > I assume the Movie Box DV is designed to take your VHS signal, convert
    > it to DV and send it to your computer via your Firewire connector.
    >
    > If this is the case, you have almost everything set up wrong.
    >
    > First, read the manual and follow the diagrams on how to set up your
    > hardware and then Studio 9. You have the proper cables going from
    > your VCR to the Movie box, then the DV signal going to your computer.
    > If the Movie box is converting the VHS composite and audio signals to
    > DV, then your computer will see a DV "camcorder" attached to the
    > Firewire input. HOWEVER, it will be the equivalent of a
    > non-controllable DV device, such as a Digital 8 Camcorder, or any
    > other analog to DV converter.
    >
    > THEREFORE, you must set Studio 9 to capture DV without device control.
    > Again, read the manual and it will tell you how to use the SETUP menus
    > and then switch to the Capture window. Since you will not have device
    > control, you will have to start and stop your VCR by hand. Cue your
    > tape to a few seconds BEFORE where you want to capture, so that you
    > have a signal coming into your computer/Studio, then click Start
    > Capture in Studio (You'll have to give your capture a name unless you
    > want it named Video 1, or whatever is the default in Studio 9, then
    > click OK and start capturing.
    >
    > BUT AGAIN, it the Movie box is actually converting your signal to DV,
    > you will need to capture to DV and convert to MPG (if that is what
    > you want) unless you want to try and convert to MPG on the fly, which
    > is not recommended.
    >
    > If you really want to capture in MPG, you should take the Movie box DV
    > back and get a hardware VHS to MPG converter, which will probably
    > connect to your computer through a USB1 (bad) or 2 (better) connector.
    >
    > Finally, go to the Pinnacle Studio 9 webboard and seek additional
    > help, after you've read the manual.
    >
    > Hope this helps,
    >
    > Susan
    >
    > PS, the "recommendation" from Fry's was that you give them money, not
    > that the Pinnacle was recommended.
    >
    > oraklistal@yahoo.com (Orak Listalavostok) wrote:
    >
    > >I want to burn my VHS home movies to DVD.
    > >
    > >As a first step, yesterday, I purchased, from Fryes, a reconditioned:
    > > Pinnacle Studio MovieBox DV (Movie Box DV hardware & Studio 9 software
    > >for $245 US dollars + California sales tax of 8.25%.
    > >
    > >a) I correctly wired the 3 VHS VCR RCA outputs to the Pinnacle MovieBoxDV
    > > white-red-yellow composite analog video input port; and I correctly
    > > wired the Pinnacle MovieBox DV output 6-pin-to-4-pin firewire to the
    > > WinXP laptop's firewire input port.
    > >b) I inserted a VHS home video tape & pressed the PLAY button on the VCR
    > > (having tested with a TV that the VCR was outputting the desired
    movie).
    > >c) Windowx XP automatically started Pinnacle Studio version 9 on my
    > > IBM A31p laptop when I plugged in the 4-pin firewire connection.
    > >
    > >Yet, after three hours of testing & reading the manual, absolutely
    > >nothing shows in the Pinnacle Studio version 9 preview pane!
    > >
    > >Despite the frustrating error message (see below):
    > > - "Setup->Capture Source" is set to "Capture devices":
    > > Video = MovieBox DV Analog
    > > Audio = MovieBox DV Analog
    > > TV Standard = NTSC
    > > Aspect Ratio = 4.3
    > > Drive C Read Data Rate = 13049 Kbyte/sec
    > > Drive C Write Data Rate = 10935 Kbyte/sec
    > > Capture Format = MPEG preset @ High quality (DVD)
    >
    > If the Movie box DV is a DV conversion device, your computer will see
    > it as a DV camcorder, and that is what Studio will have to see also.
    >
    > >
    > >Still I get the (contrarian) frustratingly insipid error message below,
    > >despite the fact I've repeatedly checked all connections, set the
    > >"Diskometer" to "Composite" and "S-Video" back & forth numerous times
    > >(leaving it on "Composite" where it belongs for copying VHS tape to
    disk).
    >
    > Again, you are NOT trying to capture analog VHS, you are trying to
    > capture a DV signal from the Movie box.
    > >
    > >Still, I get the production stopping Pinnacle Studio version 9 error:
    > >
    > > Capture Device Initialization Error:
    > > Pinnacle Studio is trying to initialuze a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder
    > > via a 1394 port.
    > >
    > > If you are trying to capture analog video:
    > > 1. Click on Setup->Capture Source and select the correct video capture
    device.
    > > 2. Open the left hand panel on the Diskometer (capture controller.) and
    set
    > > the correctd analog video input port (Composite or S-Video).
    > >
    > >If you are trying to capture from a DV or Digital 8 Camcorder:
    > > 1. Make sure our camcorder is turned on, is in VTR/VCR/Play mode, and is
    > > connected to the 1394 port on the computer.
    >
    > Again, THIS is what you are trying to do.
    > >
    > >Any ideas why Pinnacle Studio 9 insists on seeing a digital device on the
    > >firewire instead of its own MovieBoxDV hardware (supplied with the
    software)?
    > >
    > >Yes, I registered the product & activated the MPEG-2 codec unlock by
    > >obtaining an activation key from the Pinnacle Studios site & entering
    > >it into the form Help->Enter Activation Key.
    > >
    > >Since the unit was reconditioned by Fryes, do you think it's busted (I
    have
    > >only 15 days plus this has software so I don't know if there's a
    restocking
    > >fee). I'd rather the darn thing just work.
    > >
    > >Is anyone successful on an IBM A31p laptop with recording from VHS to the
    > >laptop using Pinnacle Studio version 9 & the Pinnacle MovieBox DV unit?
    > >Have you seen this annoyingly frustrating problem before?
    > >
    > >Orak Listalavostok
    >
    >


    I thought that the DV version of the MovieBox is for playing Digital
    Video, through
    a camcorder attached to the moviebox device.If you're running tapes through
    a VCR, you
    need the version of Moviebox labeled USB.

    I use a VCR attached to the Moviebox USB and I have no problems at all.

    Adrian
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

    > > I assume the Movie Box DV is designed to take your VHS signal, convert
    > > it to DV and send it to your computer via your Firewire connector.

    I finally called a series of Pinnacle Systems' support sites, starting
    with the one in Mountain View CA at 650-526-1600 and ending with a
    support technician telling me to "return the MovieBox DV to Fryes"
    (who apparently does NOT recondition these things at all).

    Pinnacle didn't even care about the error message because the hardware
    test failed. That is, when I wired the VHS player (even with the VHS
    deck turned off) red/white/yellow wires into the input RCA jacks of
    the 'Pinnacle MovieBox DV' unit & set the 'Select' button correctly,
    the appropriate LED input indicators did not light. This, Pinnacle
    support said, was a clear indication of a bad MovieBox DV unit.

    Since it was my dime, I also asked if my Pinnacle Systems hardware
    MovieBox DV converted analog composite video to digital avi or to
    digital MPEG-2; they said NONE of their consumer units performed
    hardware conversion to MPEG-2 - that is, they convert to avi & let
    the Pinnacle Studio 9 software do the conversion of avi to mpeg 2.

    This struck me as wierd. Anybody (with a digital DV camcorder) could
    simply play any VHS tape out the RCA jacks into that existing camcorder
    with the firewire inputs set to straight-through output to perform the
    same task as I just paid 250 bucks for. No additional hardware needed!

    So, my new (untried, but hopefully sound) recommendation is for me to
    dispense altogether with the MovieBox DV analog-to-AVI & then the
    software studio-9-to-MPEG2 approach, in favor of the following:
    - Play any VHS tape out normal RCA composite analog jacks
    - Connect that composite analog to an RCA-to-mini-phono cable
    - Into any digital camcorder (e.g., JVC GR-DVL820U) "AV" jack
    - With the camcorder AV phono output set to INPUT
    (PowerOn->Manual->Menu->DSC->REC SELECT->to TAPE to M)
    - Which then outputs a digital AVI signal (just like the MovieBox did)
    - Into the camcorder firewire output port into a firewire cable
    - Plugged into the laptop PC firewire input port
    - With Pinnacle Systems' $99 Studios 9 running
    - Which converts the digital camcorder avi signal to MPEG-2
    - Which is saved to the hard disk in real time
    - And then later burned to DVD out that same firewire port

    Does this (as yet untested) camcorder approach seem like it will work?

    Orak Listalavostok
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video,alt.video.dvd (More info?)

    On 13 Jun 2004 00:32:51 -0700, oraklistal@yahoo.com (Orak
    Listalavostok) wrote:

    >> > I assume the Movie Box DV is designed to take your VHS signal, convert
    >> > it to DV and send it to your computer via your Firewire connector.
    >
    >I finally called a series of Pinnacle Systems' support sites, starting
    >with the one in Mountain View CA at 650-526-1600 and ending with a
    >support technician telling me to "return the MovieBox DV to Fryes"
    >(who apparently does NOT recondition these things at all).
    >
    >Pinnacle didn't even care about the error message because the hardware
    >test failed. That is, when I wired the VHS player (even with the VHS
    >deck turned off) red/white/yellow wires into the input RCA jacks of
    >the 'Pinnacle MovieBox DV' unit & set the 'Select' button correctly,
    >the appropriate LED input indicators did not light. This, Pinnacle
    >support said, was a clear indication of a bad MovieBox DV unit.
    >
    >Since it was my dime, I also asked if my Pinnacle Systems hardware
    >MovieBox DV converted analog composite video to digital avi or to
    >digital MPEG-2; they said NONE of their consumer units performed
    >hardware conversion to MPEG-2 - that is, they convert to avi & let
    >the Pinnacle Studio 9 software do the conversion of avi to mpeg 2.

    The same applies to other analog to DV capture devices using
    firewire. By emulating a camcorder, they greatly simplify the
    requirements to capture video -- and DV camcorders play DV, nothing
    else (as far as what goes on tape and over firewire).

    >This struck me as wierd. Anybody (with a digital DV camcorder) could
    >simply play any VHS tape out the RCA jacks into that existing camcorder
    >with the firewire inputs set to straight-through output to perform the
    >same task as I just paid 250 bucks for. No additional hardware needed!

    Not if they had a camcorder which didn't pass through analog video,
    which is pretty common in EU and not uncommon on some models
    elsewhere.

    The other thing is to let you hoop up your analog VCR without
    needing a digital camcorder, especially useful if you want to convert
    a lot of VHS or other analog material without tying up the camcorder.

    But such devices aren't necessary if you have a DV camcorder with
    analog ins, and don't mind using it that way.


    The only other thing is that some non-DV output devices *do* capture
    directly to mpeg2 (using hardware capture chips), or can capture to
    higher data rates/lower compression than DV. But to do that, the
    device has to provide its own capture software, because while DV
    devices are strongly standardized, and the OS supports capture from
    them easily, the others are essentially proprietary to the maker,
    using the maker's drivers and hardware to do the task. AFAIK, the
    MovieBoxDV is DV only, same with the similar Canopus product.

    >So, my new (untried, but hopefully sound) recommendation is for me to
    >dispense altogether with the MovieBox DV analog-to-AVI & then the
    >software studio-9-to-MPEG2 approach, in favor of the following:
    > - Play any VHS tape out normal RCA composite analog jacks
    > - Connect that composite analog to an RCA-to-mini-phono cable
    > - Into any digital camcorder (e.g., JVC GR-DVL820U) "AV" jack
    > - With the camcorder AV phono output set to INPUT
    > (PowerOn->Manual->Menu->DSC->REC SELECT->to TAPE to M)
    > - Which then outputs a digital AVI signal (just like the MovieBox did)
    > - Into the camcorder firewire output port into a firewire cable
    > - Plugged into the laptop PC firewire input port
    > - With Pinnacle Systems' $99 Studios 9 running
    > - Which converts the digital camcorder avi signal to MPEG-2
    > - Which is saved to the hard disk in real time
    > - And then later burned to DVD out that same firewire port
    >
    >Does this (as yet untested) camcorder approach seem like it will work?

    That should all work just fine.
    --
    *-__Jeffery Jones__________| *Starfire* |____________________-*
    ** Muskego WI Access Channel 14/25 <http://www.execpc.com/~jeffsj/mach7/>
    *Starfire Design Studio* <http://www.starfiredesign.com/>
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr (More info?)

    In article <44d113e9.0406122332.18a8bd54@posting.google.com>, oraklistal@yahoo.com (Orak Listalavostok) wrote:
    >> > I assume the Movie Box DV is designed to take your VHS signal, convert
    >> > it to DV and send it to your computer via your Firewire connector.
    >
    >I finally called a series of Pinnacle Systems' support sites, starting
    >with the one in Mountain View CA at 650-526-1600 and ending with a
    >support technician telling me to "return the MovieBox DV to Fryes"
    >(who apparently does NOT recondition these things at all).
    >
    >Pinnacle didn't even care about the error message because the hardware
    >test failed. That is, when I wired the VHS player (even with the VHS
    >deck turned off) red/white/yellow wires into the input RCA jacks of
    >the 'Pinnacle MovieBox DV' unit & set the 'Select' button correctly,
    >the appropriate LED input indicators did not light. This, Pinnacle
    >support said, was a clear indication of a bad MovieBox DV unit.
    >
    >Since it was my dime, I also asked if my Pinnacle Systems hardware
    >MovieBox DV converted analog composite video to digital avi or to
    >digital MPEG-2; they said NONE of their consumer units performed
    >hardware conversion to MPEG-2 - that is, they convert to avi & let
    >the Pinnacle Studio 9 software do the conversion of avi to mpeg 2.
    >
    >This struck me as wierd. Anybody (with a digital DV camcorder) could
    >simply play any VHS tape out the RCA jacks into that existing camcorder
    >with the firewire inputs set to straight-through output to perform the
    >same task as I just paid 250 bucks for. No additional hardware needed!
    >

    That is not true, not ALL camcorders have a passthru or ANALOG to DV
    conversion capability built in. Some even require you to record from the VHS
    to a DV tape in the camcorder first then do the transfer.

    Some people also dont want to hook up and use an expensive camcorder as a
    conversion box.

    Also going the analog straight to MPEG2 doesnt get the best results if you
    plan on doing any editing. mpeg is already compressed and the results are
    poor.

    >So, my new (untried, but hopefully sound) recommendation is for me to
    >dispense altogether with the MovieBox DV analog-to-AVI & then the
    >software studio-9-to-MPEG2 approach, in favor of the following:
    > - Play any VHS tape out normal RCA composite analog jacks
    > - Connect that composite analog to an RCA-to-mini-phono cable
    > - Into any digital camcorder (e.g., JVC GR-DVL820U) "AV" jack
    > - With the camcorder AV phono output set to INPUT
    > (PowerOn->Manual->Menu->DSC->REC SELECT->to TAPE to M)
    > - Which then outputs a digital AVI signal (just like the MovieBox did)
    > - Into the camcorder firewire output port into a firewire cable
    > - Plugged into the laptop PC firewire input port
    > - With Pinnacle Systems' $99 Studios 9 running
    > - Which converts the digital camcorder avi signal to MPEG-2
    > - Which is saved to the hard disk in real time
    > - And then later burned to DVD out that same firewire port
    >
    >Does this (as yet untested) camcorder approach seem like it will work?
    >
    >Orak Listalavostok
  7. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    > >So, my new (untried, but hopefully sound) recommendation is for me to
    > >dispense altogether with the MovieBox DV analog-to-AVI & then the
    > >software studio-9-to-MPEG2 approach, in favor of the following:
    > > - Play any VHS tape out normal RCA composite analog jacks
    > > - Connect that composite analog to an RCA-to-mini-phono cable
    > > - Into any digital camcorder (e.g., JVC GR-DVL820U) "AV" jack
    > > - With the camcorder AV phono output set to INPUT
    > > (PowerOn->Manual->Menu->DSC->REC SELECT->to TAPE to M)
    > > - Which then outputs a digital AVI signal (just like the MovieBox did)
    > > - Into the camcorder firewire output port into a firewire cable
    > > - Plugged into the laptop PC firewire input port
    > > - With Pinnacle Systems' $99 Studios 9 running
    > > - Which converts the digital camcorder avi signal to MPEG-2
    > > - Which is saved to the hard disk in real time
    > > - And then later burned to DVD out that same firewire port

    In testing the above approach (which replaces the Pinnacle Studios
    MovieBox DV with a basic digital camcorder) I found a fatal flaw in
    the suggested camcorder settings above. The settings above are wrong!

    The correct settings (for a JVC GR-DVL820U camcorder anyway) are:
    - Turn the camcorder dial to "Play" (not to "Manual")
    - Swing open the LCD window (you should see a blank blue screen)
    - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial once (do not spin the dial)
    - You should now see the following displayed on the LCD
    VIDEO
    SYSTEM
    DISPLAY
    END
    - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "VIDEO" menu
    - To the right of the "VIDEO" menu, you now should see the items
    VIDEO SOUND MODE
    12BIT MODE
    SYNCHRO
    REC MODE
    TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY
    S/AV INPUT
    - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial, you should now see the items
    SOUND MODE = STEREO
    12BIT MODE = SOUND 1
    SYNCHRO = +- 0.0
    REC MODE = SP
    TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY = ON
    S/AV INPUT = OFF
    RETURN
    - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select
    S/AV INPUT = OFF
    - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial so you only see the one item
    S/AV INPUT = OFF
    = ON
    - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select:
    S/AV INPUT = ON
    - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial to effect the setting
    - This returns you to the items
    SOUND MODE = STEREO
    12BIT MODE = SOUND 1
    SYNCHRO = +- 0.0
    REC MODE = SP
    TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY = ON
    S/AV INPUT = ON
    RETURN
    - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "RETURN" item
    - This returns you to the items
    VIDEO
    SYSTEM
    DISPLAY
    END
    - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "END" item
    - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial to effect the setting
    - Your JVC Camcorder LCD display goes back to blue-screen normal.

    This procedure will apparently affect the following camcorder ports
    (please correct me if I make any mistakes below 'cause I'm guessing)
    o The "AV" mini-rca bi-directional port is now an INPUT (I think)
    o I'm not sure what happens to the "EDIT" mini-rca port (pray tell)
    -----
    o The "S-VIDEO" DIN bi-directional port is now an INPUT (I think)
    o The "DV" mini-firewire port is still an OUTPUT (I think)
    o The "USB" mini-usb port is still an OUTPUT (I think)

    If my guess is correct above, then the two cables I need are:
    - 3 RCA jacks to 1 mini-rca connector
    - DV firewire to DV firewire connector

    The assumption is the setup is as follows:
    - The VHS tape plays in the VCR unit out the 3 RCA LINEOUT jacks
    - That analog signal enters the camcorder via the "AV" input jack
    - Note: Make sure the camcorder is set to "S/AV INPUT = ON"
    -----
    - The AVI digital output signal goes out the "DV" mini-firewire port
    - Which goes into the laptop PC mini-firewire input
    - Hopefully, Pinnacle Studios 9 (or maybe Ulead Video Studio SE 4.0)
    will then help save that digital AVI signal to the hard disk
    -----
    - Then, if edits are necessary, Pinnacle Studio 9 or Ulead VideoStudio
    can be used to edit the AVI file (I now realize nobody edits MPEG-2)
    - Once the edits are performed (if any), then Pinnacle Studio 9 or
    Ulead Video Studio 4.0 (I think) can be used to convert the huge
    AVI file to the much-compressed MPEG-2 on disk.
    - Then any DVD burning software (Sonic 6.0 perhaps) can be used to
    burn the resulting MPEG-2 file to a DVD disc.
    -----

    What do the experts think?
    Does this latest approach look like it will finally work?

    Orak Listalavostok
  8. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    Should do!
    You'll need to be careful over the av-in lead, did one come with the
    camcorder? Hopefully yes, otherwise you'll need the manufacturers one as the
    poles tend to be wired differently in different cams, assuming you have a
    miniJack av-in port,.
    If you don't have any of the studio software yet, you could use windows
    capture and then MM to edit.
    Don't use s-video unless you have a s-video vcr.
    Could use the dvd authoring software to do the mpeg2 conversion as well.
    Graham

    --
    Graham Hughes
    MVP Digital Media
    www.simplydv.co.uk
    www.dvds2treasure.com
    "Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:44d113e9.0406170311.de0f915@posting.google.com...
    > > >So, my new (untried, but hopefully sound) recommendation is for me to
    > > >dispense altogether with the MovieBox DV analog-to-AVI & then the
    > > >software studio-9-to-MPEG2 approach, in favor of the following:
    > > > - Play any VHS tape out normal RCA composite analog jacks
    > > > - Connect that composite analog to an RCA-to-mini-phono cable
    > > > - Into any digital camcorder (e.g., JVC GR-DVL820U) "AV" jack
    > > > - With the camcorder AV phono output set to INPUT
    > > > (PowerOn->Manual->Menu->DSC->REC SELECT->to TAPE to M)
    > > > - Which then outputs a digital AVI signal (just like the MovieBox
    did)
    > > > - Into the camcorder firewire output port into a firewire cable
    > > > - Plugged into the laptop PC firewire input port
    > > > - With Pinnacle Systems' $99 Studios 9 running
    > > > - Which converts the digital camcorder avi signal to MPEG-2
    > > > - Which is saved to the hard disk in real time
    > > > - And then later burned to DVD out that same firewire port
    >
    > In testing the above approach (which replaces the Pinnacle Studios
    > MovieBox DV with a basic digital camcorder) I found a fatal flaw in
    > the suggested camcorder settings above. The settings above are wrong!
    >
    > The correct settings (for a JVC GR-DVL820U camcorder anyway) are:
    > - Turn the camcorder dial to "Play" (not to "Manual")
    > - Swing open the LCD window (you should see a blank blue screen)
    > - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial once (do not spin the dial)
    > - You should now see the following displayed on the LCD
    > VIDEO
    > SYSTEM
    > DISPLAY
    > END
    > - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "VIDEO" menu
    > - To the right of the "VIDEO" menu, you now should see the items
    > VIDEO SOUND MODE
    > 12BIT MODE
    > SYNCHRO
    > REC MODE
    > TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY
    > S/AV INPUT
    > - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial, you should now see the items
    > SOUND MODE = STEREO
    > 12BIT MODE = SOUND 1
    > SYNCHRO = +- 0.0
    > REC MODE = SP
    > TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY = ON
    > S/AV INPUT = OFF
    > RETURN
    > - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select
    > S/AV INPUT = OFF
    > - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial so you only see the one item
    > S/AV INPUT = OFF
    > = ON
    > - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select:
    > S/AV INPUT = ON
    > - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial to effect the setting
    > - This returns you to the items
    > SOUND MODE = STEREO
    > 12BIT MODE = SOUND 1
    > SYNCHRO = +- 0.0
    > REC MODE = SP
    > TAPE->MEMORYCARD COPY = ON
    > S/AV INPUT = ON
    > RETURN
    > - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "RETURN" item
    > - This returns you to the items
    > VIDEO
    > SYSTEM
    > DISPLAY
    > END
    > - Spin the "Menu/Bright" dial to select the "END" item
    > - Depress the "Menu/Bright" dial to effect the setting
    > - Your JVC Camcorder LCD display goes back to blue-screen normal.
    >
    > This procedure will apparently affect the following camcorder ports
    > (please correct me if I make any mistakes below 'cause I'm guessing)
    > o The "AV" mini-rca bi-directional port is now an INPUT (I think)
    > o I'm not sure what happens to the "EDIT" mini-rca port (pray tell)
    > -----
    > o The "S-VIDEO" DIN bi-directional port is now an INPUT (I think)
    > o The "DV" mini-firewire port is still an OUTPUT (I think)
    > o The "USB" mini-usb port is still an OUTPUT (I think)
    >
    > If my guess is correct above, then the two cables I need are:
    > - 3 RCA jacks to 1 mini-rca connector
    > - DV firewire to DV firewire connector
    >
    > The assumption is the setup is as follows:
    > - The VHS tape plays in the VCR unit out the 3 RCA LINEOUT jacks
    > - That analog signal enters the camcorder via the "AV" input jack
    > - Note: Make sure the camcorder is set to "S/AV INPUT = ON"
    > -----
    > - The AVI digital output signal goes out the "DV" mini-firewire port
    > - Which goes into the laptop PC mini-firewire input
    > - Hopefully, Pinnacle Studios 9 (or maybe Ulead Video Studio SE 4.0)
    > will then help save that digital AVI signal to the hard disk
    > -----
    > - Then, if edits are necessary, Pinnacle Studio 9 or Ulead VideoStudio
    > can be used to edit the AVI file (I now realize nobody edits MPEG-2)
    > - Once the edits are performed (if any), then Pinnacle Studio 9 or
    > Ulead Video Studio 4.0 (I think) can be used to convert the huge
    > AVI file to the much-compressed MPEG-2 on disk.
    > - Then any DVD burning software (Sonic 6.0 perhaps) can be used to
    > burn the resulting MPEG-2 file to a DVD disc.
    > -----
    >
    > What do the experts think?
    > Does this latest approach look like it will finally work?
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok
  9. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    "Graham Hughes, MVP Digital Media" <graham@simplydv.co.uk> wrote in message news:<uOEUgbHVEHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>...
    > Could use the dvd authoring software to do the mpeg2 conversion as well.

    I'm getting closer by the day; but I still have some 'issues'
    (like how to burn 8 Gbytes of MPEG-2 to a DVD with Studio 9.1).

    Here's where I'm currently stuck:

    I successfully played my store-bought 2 hour 35 minute VHS "Gladiator"
    original from the VHS output into the JVC miniDV camcorder and out
    the JVC digital camcorder firewire into the IBM A31p firewire using
    Pinnacle Studio 9.1 (with MPEG encoding enabled) to save the resultant
    AVI file (30,719,448 KB) onto the laptop WinXP NTFS second hard disk.

    The first try, half way through capturing of the movie, the WinXP IBM
    ThinkPad crashed; the second attempt, just minutes from the end of the
    movie, MPEG-2 rendering of the AVI began without me doing anything!
    It (Studio 9.1) automatically created (seemingly on it own agenda)
    a 7 Gbyte MPG file; then it (Studio 9.1) removed the 30 Gbyte AVI file!

    All that AVI data (30 gigs worth) was lost in an instant.

    I fussed with Studio 9.1 settings (realizing my original error in
    allowing MPG as the final output) and then 'captured' a smaller
    AVI of just the last few scenes of Gladiator, creating a 3 GB ending
    AVI (3,128,824 KB) of the last few scenes until the credits completed.

    I now had (only) a 7 GB MPG plus a 3 GB AVI of the Gladiator archive.

    Using the Pinnacle Studio 9.1 "Edit" GUI, I pasted together the first
    7 GB MPG plus the final scenes' 3 GB AVI and then re-rendered (if
    that's what it's called) to a single MPG2 (again).

    The result (which took forever) was an 8 GByte MPEG2 file.

    QUESTIONS:
    My first question concerns the mixing of the MPG & AVI file.
    Did I have to re-render the WHOLE THING to MPEG-2 (which took forever)?
    Could I have just rendered the much smaller last few scenes' AVI to
    MPG 2 and then simply COMBINED the two MPG files (large + tiny)?

    How?

    My second question revolves around how to burn this final 8 Gbyte
    MPEG-2 file to a normal DVD (about 4 1/2 gigabytes). Studio 9.1 says
    the file is too large to burn to DVD. Is there a way to tell it
    (Studio-9.1) to squish (compress) the MPG-2 file by 50%?

    I have Sonic RecordNow version 6.7.0 (which, I think, squishes to fit
    on DVD), but don't I need Studio-9.1 to first put the MPG2 file into
    a DVD 'image' before using Sonic RecordNow to burn to DVD?

    If you understand my newbie VHS-to-DVD dilemma, please advise.
    If you need clarifying information of the stumbling block, please ask.

    Orak Listalavostok
  10. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    "Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:44d113e9.0406201854.1515f9d0@posting.google.com...
    > "Graham Hughes, MVP Digital Media" <graham@simplydv.co.uk> wrote in
    message news:<uOEUgbHVEHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>...
    > > Could use the dvd authoring software to do the mpeg2 conversion as well.
    >
    > I'm getting closer by the day; but I still have some 'issues'
    > (like how to burn 8 Gbytes of MPEG-2 to a DVD with Studio 9.1).

    Wait til dual layer discs arrive and buy a dual layer burner and a dvd
    authoring app that supports it.
    >
    > Here's where I'm currently stuck:
    >
    > I successfully played my store-bought 2 hour 35 minute VHS "Gladiator"
    > original from the VHS output into the JVC miniDV camcorder and out
    > the JVC digital camcorder firewire into the IBM A31p firewire using
    > Pinnacle Studio 9.1 (with MPEG encoding enabled) to save the resultant
    > AVI file (30,719,448 KB) onto the laptop WinXP NTFS second hard disk.
    >
    > The first try, half way through capturing of the movie, the WinXP IBM
    > ThinkPad crashed; the second attempt, just minutes from the end of the
    > movie, MPEG-2 rendering of the AVI began without me doing anything!
    > It (Studio 9.1) automatically created (seemingly on it own agenda)
    > a 7 Gbyte MPG file; then it (Studio 9.1) removed the 30 Gbyte AVI file!
    >
    > All that AVI data (30 gigs worth) was lost in an instant.
    >
    > I fussed with Studio 9.1 settings (realizing my original error in
    > allowing MPG as the final output) and then 'captured' a smaller
    > AVI of just the last few scenes of Gladiator, creating a 3 GB ending
    > AVI (3,128,824 KB) of the last few scenes until the credits completed.
    >
    > I now had (only) a 7 GB MPG plus a 3 GB AVI of the Gladiator archive.
    >
    > Using the Pinnacle Studio 9.1 "Edit" GUI, I pasted together the first
    > 7 GB MPG plus the final scenes' 3 GB AVI and then re-rendered (if
    > that's what it's called) to a single MPG2 (again).
    >
    > The result (which took forever) was an 8 GByte MPEG2 file.
    >
    > QUESTIONS:
    > My first question concerns the mixing of the MPG & AVI file.
    > Did I have to re-render the WHOLE THING to MPEG-2 (which took forever)?
    I believe so with studio.
    > Could I have just rendered the much smaller last few scenes' AVI to
    > MPG 2 and then simply COMBINED the two MPG files (large + tiny)?
    I think that it would still have wanted to render, as you would have a join.
    >
    > How?
    >
    > My second question revolves around how to burn this final 8 Gbyte
    > MPEG-2 file to a normal DVD (about 4 1/2 gigabytes). Studio 9.1 says
    > the file is too large to burn to DVD. Is there a way to tell it
    > (Studio-9.1) to squish (compress) the MPG-2 file by 50%?
    Don't think it can, but I may be wrong, do you have any quality or time
    based options? As in pick low quality and it will fit on 2 1/2 hours?
    >
    > I have Sonic RecordNow version 6.7.0 (which, I think, squishes to fit
    > on DVD), but don't I need Studio-9.1 to first put the MPG2 file into
    > a DVD 'image' before using Sonic RecordNow to burn to DVD?
    I would have thought It should take a std dvd mpeg2 file, if not you'll have
    to get a dv-avi file and take it in.
    >
    > If you understand my newbie VHS-to-DVD dilemma, please advise.
    > If you need clarifying information of the stumbling block, please ask.
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok

    Doing all this will reault in quite a poor quality movie to watch, probably
    worse than the vhs. It will never get better than vhs as this was how it
    started. You have compressed to mpeg2, compression will result in lower
    quality. You then compress heavily to fit on one disc, much poorer quality.
    Personally I'd watch the vhs!!

    Graham
  11. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    > > I'm getting closer by the day; but I still have some 'issues'
    > > (like how to burn 8 Gbytes of MPEG-2 to a DVD with Studio 9.1).
    >
    > Wait til dual layer discs arrive and buy a dual layer burner and a dvd
    > authoring app that supports it.

    I'm surprised if Pinnacle Systems Studio 9 doesn't convert the MP2 to DVD.
    But, you're the expert, not me. Can someone doublecheck this supposition?

    Another idea is to find a program on http://www.doom9.org that converts
    MP2 files to DVD format on your hard disk so you can burn the resultant
    DVD image AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS directories to the top-level of the DVD.

    I think SmartRipper, version 2.41 can convert MP2 to DVD.
    I'm not sure, but, DVDShrink 3.1.7 should compress DVD images.

    Both freeware programs should have pointers on the doom9 site.

    Terena
  12. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    terenachang@yahoo.com (Terena Chang) wrote in message news:<38f6d1b1.0406220241.49d0e50a@posting.google.com>...
    > Another idea is to find a program on http://www.doom9.org that converts
    > MP2 files to DVD format on your hard disk so you can burn the resultant
    > DVD image AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS directories to the top-level of the DVD.

    I just asked a friend who converts home movies to DVD for a living.
    He said you're stuck. He doesn't know of any program out there for
    amateurs that can convert any MP2 file (of any size) to DVD format.
    He's been asking Pinnacle Systems for years to do it for Studio.

    Instead of Pinnacle Systems Studio 9, he uses a $600 dollar
    professional capture/edit/shrink/burn program which can shrink
    the MP2 file down to less than 4.7 GBytes but even if you had that
    he told me to tell you there isn't any program out there for laymen
    to convert the 4.7 GByte MP2 file that results to DVD format.

    I think he called it "DVD.iso" if I remember correctly.

    Anyway, he said to let you know your best bet is to find a commercial
    operation that professionally converts home movies to DVD discs.
    It's not safe to do it yourself according to my good friend.
    If you send me email, I can forward his email & phone contact
    information. Bear in mind, I'm just passing this along. I don't
    know for a fact whether this information is 100% correct or not.

    Bo-bo
  13. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    In article <8e505c87.0406222245.58c51dec@posting.google.com>, bob_bonda@yahoo.com (Robert A. Bonda) wrote:
    >terenachang@yahoo.com (Terena Chang) wrote in message
    > news:<38f6d1b1.0406220241.49d0e50a@posting.google.com>...
    >> Another idea is to find a program on http://www.doom9.org that converts
    >> MP2 files to DVD format on your hard disk so you can burn the resultant
    >> DVD image AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS directories to the top-level of the DVD.
    >
    >I just asked a friend who converts home movies to DVD for a living.
    >He said you're stuck. He doesn't know of any program out there for
    >amateurs that can convert any MP2 file (of any size) to DVD format.
    >He's been asking Pinnacle Systems for years to do it for Studio.
    >
    >Instead of Pinnacle Systems Studio 9, he uses a $600 dollar
    >professional capture/edit/shrink/burn program which can shrink
    >the MP2 file down to less than 4.7 GBytes but even if you had that
    >he told me to tell you there isn't any program out there for laymen
    >to convert the 4.7 GByte MP2 file that results to DVD format.
    >

    Bullshit, run it thru TMPGenc


    >I think he called it "DVD.iso" if I remember correctly.
    >
    >Anyway, he said to let you know your best bet is to find a commercial
    >operation that professionally converts home movies to DVD discs.
    >It's not safe to do it yourself according to my good friend.
    >If you send me email, I can forward his email & phone contact
    >information. Bear in mind, I'm just passing this along. I don't
    >know for a fact whether this information is 100% correct or not.
    >
    >Bo-bo
  14. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 21:34:11 GMT, glenzabr@xmission.com (GMAN) wrote:

    >In article <8e505c87.0406222245.58c51dec@posting.google.com>, bob_bonda@yahoo.com (Robert A. Bonda) wrote:
    >>terenachang@yahoo.com (Terena Chang) wrote in message
    >> news:<38f6d1b1.0406220241.49d0e50a@posting.google.com>...
    >>> Another idea is to find a program on http://www.doom9.org that converts
    >>> MP2 files to DVD format on your hard disk so you can burn the resultant
    >>> DVD image AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS directories to the top-level of the DVD.
    >>
    >>I just asked a friend who converts home movies to DVD for a living.
    >>He said you're stuck. He doesn't know of any program out there for
    >>amateurs that can convert any MP2 file (of any size) to DVD format.
    >>He's been asking Pinnacle Systems for years to do it for Studio.
    >>
    >>Instead of Pinnacle Systems Studio 9, he uses a $600 dollar
    >>professional capture/edit/shrink/burn program which can shrink
    >>the MP2 file down to less than 4.7 GBytes but even if you had that
    >>he told me to tell you there isn't any program out there for laymen
    >>to convert the 4.7 GByte MP2 file that results to DVD format.
    >>
    >
    >Bullshit, run it thru TMPGenc
    >
    >
    Right! there are all sorts of software solutions for converting from
    one codec to another.
    I have several low cost proggies that do just that.(DVD shrink comes
    to mind for converting dual layer to single and allowing for
    compression control.)
    DR. Divx
    Winmpg converter
    DVD magic
    Imgtool
    DVD copy express

    >
    >>I think he called it "DVD.iso" if I remember correctly.
    >>
    >>Anyway, he said to let you know your best bet is to find a commercial
    >>operation that professionally converts home movies to DVD discs.
    >>It's not safe to do it yourself according to my good friend.
    >>If you send me email, I can forward his email & phone contact
    >>information. Bear in mind, I'm just passing this along. I don't
    >>know for a fact whether this information is 100% correct or not.
    >>
    >>Bo-bo
  15. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    gothika <Vampyres@nettaxi.com> wrote in message news:<vq3ld0h6m7kc6136f5mrls9f4aob9v5pdl@4ax.com>...
    > >Bullshit, run it thru TMPGenc
    > >
    > There are all sorts of software solutions for converting from
    > one codec to another.
    > (DVD shrink comes to mind for converting dual layer to single
    > and allowing for compression control.)
    > - DR. Divx
    > - Winmpg converter
    > - DVD magic
    > - Imgtool
    > - DVD copy express

    I think I bit off more DVD than I could chew, for starters.

    This happens to me a lot. I was haughty; I thought I could just
    burn hours of composite analog video in my first sessions.
    Well, my hypothesis was wrong. Burning large composite video
    to DVD isn't as easy as I thought it could be. But I'll get it.

    For starters, I boiled the initial problems down to a pipecleaner
    testcase, i.e., to burn a minute of television to DVD as shown:
    - Hook VCR RCA jacks to the MovieBox DV & set VCR lineout to "TV"
    - Plug the MovieBox DV firewire output into the ThinkPad laptop
    - Power on the VCR and Pinnacle Systems MovieBox DV unit
    - Set the MovieBox DV inputs & outpus accordingly using "select"
    - Start up Studio 9.1.2 & set the auxillary files folder
    - Save the TV signal (as an avi) to disk using Studio 9 "capture"
    - Edit the resultant AVI file using Studio 9 "edit" mode
    - Save to DVD format (VIDEO_TS) using Studio 9 "make movie" mode
    by pressing the Studio 9 "Disc: Create disc" button
    - Wait for the two-pass "Make movie in progress" to complete
    - There will be no indication Studio 9 is done other than the
    "Create Disc" button goes from red back to green
    - This created a "video_ts" dir in the Auxillary files location
    - This 62.4 MB dir contained VIDEO_TS.IFO, VIDEO_TS.VOB and
    others (which played for 52 seconds with Intervideo WinDVD 3.2)
    - This "video_ts" directory easily burned to DVD using Sonic
    RecordNow, version 6.7.0 & played on a home DVD player.

    This test proved we don't need the MPEG-2 file at all.
    So, my innocdnt questions about the need to squish MPEG-2 files
    & then convert them to VIDEO_TS/*.VOB format appear to be
    erroneous red herrings born out of my DVD-burning ignorance.

    My new hypothesis is that "what works for small files, works
    for larger files".

    To test this new hypothesis, I will need to run this makeshift
    Rube Goldberg TIVO system for a few hours to create a very
    large (greater than 4.7 GB) VIDEO_TS/*.VOB DVD directory.

    If Studio 9.1.2 then compresses that large VIDEO_TS DVD directory
    as my hypothesis assumes, then others may successfully follow in
    my (documented above) footsteps.

    If Studio 9.1.2 doesn't automatically compress the VIDEO_TS DVD
    directory to 4.7 GB, then my next attempt will be to see if
    the suggested DVD Shrink 3.1, or Sonic MyDVD 5.2.1, or
    TMPGEnc 2.521, etc. will compress the VIDEO_TS/*.VOB DVD files
    down to the 4.7 GB single-layer DVD burning specification.

    Does this sound like a workable plan (question to the experts)?

    Orak Listalavostok
  16. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video,alt.video.dvdr,rec.video.production,microsoft.public.windowsxp.video (More info?)

    > To test this new hypothesis, I will need to run this makeshift
    > Rube Goldberg TIVO system for a few hours to create a very
    > large (greater than 4.7 GB) VIDEO_TS/*.VOB DVD directory.
    >
    > If Studio 9.1.2 then compresses that large VIDEO_TS DVD directory
    > as my hypothesis assumes, then others may successfully follow in
    > my (documented above) footsteps.

    Thanks to your help (especially the tons of advice that users sent
    to my email address) and a half-dozen experiments tweaking the
    software, I was easily able to successfully overcome that last
    hurdle of large amounts of data to be rendered to MPEG-2 and then
    to be compiled to DVD VIDEO_TS/*.VOB format under 4.7 GB in size.

    Using Pinnacle Studio 9.1.2, & having captured the data at full
    resolution, simply setting the output resolution to its lowest
    notch (of 3,000 Kbits/sec) still left 18 minutes of a 33 GB avi
    test file off the 4.7 GB DVD disc (i.e., only 131 minutes of
    captured video fit on a DVD disc at 3000 Kbits/sec resolution).

    Obviously, something more than just resolution needed to be modified.
    That key adjustment was simply to switch the Studio 9 DVD audio
    encoding format from PCM audio, to MPEG audio. Voila!

    How does this work?

    Switching the encoding format for DVD audio from pulse code
    modulation, i.e., linear digital audio, at 16 bits per sample
    for two channels, at 48 (or 32 or 44.1) KHz, to MPEG reduces
    the storage requirements greatly - I even had 35 minutes free
    space on the DVD disc (150 minutes on disk at 40% quality).

    Extrapolating and stepping up the resolution bit by bit, we
    arrived at the optimal settings for fitting the 150 minutes of
    captured video to a single disk to be 3750 Kbits/second resolution,
    MPEG (vs PCM) audio encoding, & video filtering turned on.
    This provided 150 minutes on disc, with only 14 seconds free.
    By tweaking these settings, the quality rose from 40% to 46%.

    Contraindications:
    - DVD video quality at 3750 Kbits/second (i.e., 46%) is not stellar.
    - Image sharpness is slightly reduced by the filter-video setting.
    - MPEG audio is required on PAL and, in practice, widely supported
    in NTSC video players; yet, it may not be universally supported.

    In summary, simply tweaking the Kbits/second settings did NOT do
    enough to fit a large (33 GByte, 150 minute) video to DVD; more
    needed to be done. A log of the experiments performed to date will
    be appended so that others may reproduce with the results shown.

    Orak Listalavostok
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