lcd monitor tv

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

i'd like to buy an lcd- or plasma-tv (probably lcd), but if i connect a
computer to such a screen, do i get the quality i have with my
crt-computer-monitor? (assuming for example an XGA "1,024x768"
specification for the lcd-tv and a vga-connector on the tv(RGB) ).
What happens to the computer screen if you buy an tv with an aspect ratio of
16:9 or 4:3? it's that sort of questions that a book should provide.

tx very much
5 answers Last reply
More about monitor
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    In article <40c1bae9$0$8410$a0ced6e1@news.skynet.be>,
    slurper <slurper1234@skynet.be> wrote:
    > i'd like to buy an lcd- or plasma-tv (probably lcd), but if i connect a
    > computer to such a screen, do i get the quality i have with my
    > crt-computer-monitor?

    I don't know whether the TV/monitor will be as sharp as a random monitor.
    I suspect not; rather, that the TV will be optimized for images, and that
    the monitor would be optimized for text. Got me, though; the TV/monitor may
    be so good that even a non-optimal use would look pretty good.

    > (assuming for example an XGA "1,024x768" specification for the lcd-tv and
    > a vga-connector on the tv(RGB) ).

    Why do that? Use some 16:9 resolution, such as 1280x720 or whatever. Then
    at least the image is the correct shape, assuming square pixels.

    --
    -eben ebQenW1@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar
    "God does not play dice" -- Einstein
    "Not only does God play dice, he sometimes throws
    them where they can't be seen." -- Stephen Hawking
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "slurper" <slurper1234@skynet.be> wrote in message
    news:40c1bae9$0$8410$a0ced6e1@news.skynet.be...
    > i'd like to buy an lcd- or plasma-tv (probably lcd), but if i connect a
    > computer to such a screen, do i get the quality i have with my
    > crt-computer-monitor? (assuming for example an XGA "1,024x768"
    > specification for the lcd-tv and a vga-connector on the tv(RGB) ).
    > What happens to the computer screen if you buy an tv with an aspect ratio
    of
    > 16:9 or 4:3? it's that sort of questions that a book should provide.

    With an LCD or plasma screen, you're dealing with fixed
    pixels - so, unlike the CRT displays of the past, there is no
    tradeoff between spot size and brightness, and so TVs and
    monitors both resolve all the pixels on the screen. So as long
    as you are driving the display at its preferred (native) format,
    you'll see the same results in terms of quality with either TV
    or computer input. But you DO want to drive it in its native
    mode, whether 16:9 or 4:3, for optimum results - and your
    computer should easily be capable of this.

    Bob M.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Bob Myers wrote:

    >
    > "slurper" <slurper1234@skynet.be> wrote in message
    > news:40c1bae9$0$8410$a0ced6e1@news.skynet.be...
    >> i'd like to buy an lcd- or plasma-tv (probably lcd), but if i connect a
    >> computer to such a screen, do i get the quality i have with my
    >> crt-computer-monitor? (assuming for example an XGA "1,024x768"
    >> specification for the lcd-tv and a vga-connector on the tv(RGB) ).
    >> What happens to the computer screen if you buy an tv with an aspect ratio
    > of
    >> 16:9 or 4:3? it's that sort of questions that a book should provide.
    >
    > With an LCD or plasma screen, you're dealing with fixed
    > pixels - so, unlike the CRT displays of the past, there is no
    > tradeoff between spot size and brightness, and so TVs and
    > monitors both resolve all the pixels on the screen. So as long
    > as you are driving the display at its preferred (native) format,
    > you'll see the same results in terms of quality with either TV
    > or computer input. But you DO want to drive it in its native
    > mode, whether 16:9 or 4:3, for optimum results - and your
    > computer should easily be capable of this.

    However if one is playing games they often are limited to a specific range
    of 4:3 resolutions, which on a 16:9 monitor will either not use all the
    available screen space or will be stretched horizontally depending on how
    the monitor handles the signal--mine can go either way depending on which
    options I've set.

    This may or may not be a problem, depending on the game.

    Also, the quality depends on the interface--I don't get near the image
    quality out of component that I do out of DVI or VGA, but not all
    televisions can accept a wide range of signals on the DVI or VGA inputs, so
    that might not be an option depending on the set. If you're restricted to
    component then the image quality is going to be somewhat dismal compared to
    the same resolution displayed on a computer monitor.

    At least that's my experience with my setup.


    > Bob M.

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

    >However if one is playing games they often are limited to a specific range
    >of 4:3 resolutions, which on a 16:9 monitor will either not use all the
    >available screen space or will be stretched horizontally depending on how
    >the monitor handles the signal--mine can go either way depending on which
    >options I've set.

    It will be interesting to see what direction computer displays go in,
    once the "normal" TV is 16:9, which of course it already is on the
    high-end. My guess is that monitors (and thus games and such) will go
    16:9 as well.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "chrisv" <chrisv@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:hj79c0tr9np5ekooom2d4oqb3poq4akaot@4ax.com...
    > It will be interesting to see what direction computer displays go in,
    > once the "normal" TV is 16:9, which of course it already is on the
    > high-end. My guess is that monitors (and thus games and such) will go
    > 16:9 as well.

    Well, "widescreen" at least. Oddly enough, 16:10 aspect ratios
    (such as 1920 x 1200, instead of 1920 x 1080) seem to be
    more popular in "computer" displays these days than 16:9 -
    possibly because this still is a very good match to 16:9 content, but
    lets you show such content full-scale while still leaving some pixels
    on the top or bottom for toolbars, etc..

    Bob M.
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