Video Card Fan Starts Buzzing

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

Hi,

My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know if
its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with the
Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions are...
1. Is the buzzing a concern?
2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by 2
"Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there isnt
a heat sink on this one)
8 answers Last reply
More about video card starts buzzing
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    just clean it
    be careful how you pull it apart
    a clean will usually fix it
    else use another fan - depending on the size , you can just walk into a pc
    repair shop and
    buy a fan over the counter $2 - $5 usually


    "Falcon 1209" <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:OEpEc.4508$tU.777@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    > and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know
    > if
    > its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with
    > the
    > Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions
    > are...
    > 1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    > 2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by
    > 2
    > "Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there
    > isnt
    > a heat sink on this one)
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    I have a MSI Ti4200 and it started doing the same thing after I fiddled
    with it. But I turned off the system and the next day it was back to
    normal. Had that happen a few times but all is good for many many months
    now.
    On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 04:29:19 GMT, PBS <pbREMSPAMsoft@bigpond.net.au> wrote:

    > just clean it
    > be careful how you pull it apart
    > a clean will usually fix it
    > else use another fan - depending on the size , you can just walk into a
    > pc
    > repair shop and
    > buy a fan over the counter $2 - $5 usually
    >
    >
    >
    > "Falcon 1209" <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OEpEc.4508$tU.777@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started
    >> buzzing
    >> and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont
    >> know
    >> if
    >> its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with
    >> the
    >> Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions
    >> are...
    >> 1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    >> 2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in
    >> by
    >> 2
    >> "Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there
    >> isnt
    >> a heat sink on this one)
    >>
    >>
    >
    >


    --
    Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 21:38:41 -0500, "Falcon 1209"
    <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    >and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know if
    >its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with the
    >Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions are...
    >1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    >2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by 2
    >"Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there isnt
    >a heat sink on this one)
    >

    1. Yes, the buzzing is a concern. If you were to lube it with a
    drop of heavyweight oil, now, and each time it start buzzing
    again (which could be soon or a long, long time depending on the
    particular fan and degree of wear) you could most likely get
    several more years of use from it. This is assuming it uses only
    a sleeve bearing. If it has a ball-bearing (you might not be
    able to trust the label, sadly enough) it cannot be lubed, as
    none are thick enough to have both the ball bearing and sleeve in
    same fan. Even if you choose to replace the fan it would be good
    to lube it now, as what may happen is that the fan will seize
    after you turn the system off, then you turn it on and it's quiet
    because it's not running, so video card overheats.

    2. "Usually" those that use push-pins are not glued on. It
    might use a thermal interface material that melts after the card
    heats up, making it seem stuck on like a glue would, but these
    are much easier to get off if you try after running the card for
    a while so it's heated up, softened the material. Just as likely
    it could just be the typical thermal grease, much easier to
    remove. If you grasp the fan frame with two fingers and can
    wiggle it back and forth fairly easily, it would almost certainly
    be the grease under it.

    The Tennmax Lasagna fans are poor at cooling and also use
    low-quality junk fans. You'd be better off getting something
    else.

    What I usually do is take an old Pentium 1 heatsink and put a new
    fan on it, something like a a 50-60mm x 15mm thick of the low-RPM
    variety. That makes the 'sink too thick to allow use of the PCI
    slot below the card but I deliberately leave that slot empty
    anyway to improve cooling. A decent name-brand fan as I
    described will last multiple times as long as the tiny thin fans,
    and be quieter per same cooling provided the replacement heatsink
    is at least as big as the old one.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in message news:<ikg4e0p9gv1v1n6hog5bh3hr4mov6rfd1v@4ax.com>...
    > On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 21:38:41 -0500, "Falcon 1209"
    > <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    > >and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know if
    > >its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with the
    > >Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions are...
    > >1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    > >2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by 2
    > >"Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there isnt
    > >a heat sink on this one)
    > >
    >
    > 1. Yes, the buzzing is a concern. If you were to lube it with a
    > drop of heavyweight oil, now, and each time it start buzzing
    > again (which could be soon or a long, long time depending on the
    > particular fan and degree of wear) you could most likely get
    > several more years of use from it. This is assuming it uses only
    > a sleeve bearing. If it has a ball-bearing (you might not be
    > able to trust the label, sadly enough) it cannot be lubed, as
    > none are thick enough to have both the ball bearing and sleeve in
    > same fan. Even if you choose to replace the fan it would be good
    > to lube it now, as what may happen is that the fan will seize
    > after you turn the system off, then you turn it on and it's quiet
    > because it's not running, so video card overheats.
    >
    > 2. "Usually" those that use push-pins are not glued on. It
    > might use a thermal interface material that melts after the card
    > heats up, making it seem stuck on like a glue would, but these
    > are much easier to get off if you try after running the card for
    > a while so it's heated up, softened the material. Just as likely
    > it could just be the typical thermal grease, much easier to
    > remove. If you grasp the fan frame with two fingers and can
    > wiggle it back and forth fairly easily, it would almost certainly
    > be the grease under it.
    >
    > The Tennmax Lasagna fans are poor at cooling and also use
    > low-quality junk fans. You'd be better off getting something
    > else.
    >
    > What I usually do is take an old Pentium 1 heatsink and put a new
    > fan on it, something like a a 50-60mm x 15mm thick of the low-RPM
    > variety. That makes the 'sink too thick to allow use of the PCI
    > slot below the card but I deliberately leave that slot empty
    > anyway to improve cooling. A decent name-brand fan as I
    > described will last multiple times as long as the tiny thin fans,
    > and be quieter per same cooling provided the replacement heatsink
    > is at least as big as the old one.

    So what fan/heatsink should I get? And How do i go about installing it?
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    On 1 Jul 2004 10:48:48 -0700, falcon1209@hotmail.com (Falcon1209)
    wrote:

    >kony <spam@spam.com> wrote in message news:<ikg4e0p9gv1v1n6hog5bh3hr4mov6rfd1v@4ax.com>...
    >> On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 21:38:41 -0500, "Falcon 1209"
    >> <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hi,
    >> >
    >> >My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    >> >and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know if
    >> >its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with the
    >> >Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions are...
    >> >1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    >> >2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by 2
    >> >"Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there isnt
    >> >a heat sink on this one)

    I had a Chaintech GF3ti200 Gold, and they make a nice card.
    Make sure it's not just some small dustball obstruction to the fan.
    It's good to go through your case with a can of air every few months
    or so and physically inspect your fans and such. This is the good
    thing about having a clear side panel - you can see all that stuff
    running!

    >So what fan/heatsink should I get? And How do i go about installing it?

    I use an Iceberq4 copper kit (and 4 additional h/s for the backside
    mem chips) for my Sapphire Radeon 9800PRO and like the results (it's
    got an R360 *9800XT* core, but I'm only mildly oc'ing it - the kit is
    mostly for longevity). I've since re-attached it using Arctic Silver
    5 (superior thermal material). All hsf will come with mounting
    instructions. Check here for ideas:

    www.1coolpc.com


    Good luck!
    regards,


    =======
    fredman
    =======
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    On 1 Jul 2004 10:48:48 -0700, falcon1209@hotmail.com (Falcon1209)
    wrote:


    >So what fan/heatsink should I get? And How do i go about installing it?

    As I wrote previously, I usually use old leftover socket 7
    heatsinks, then I affix them with either the original clip
    (rarely, when the 'sink is compatible and light enough) or
    usually attach with Arctic Alumina Epoxy. The most important
    part of using an epoxy, is to use a heatsink that accepts a
    standard fan, so if you found the fan inadequate or if it failed,
    it can easily be swapped with a different fan some day. This way
    it is not a problem that the metal portion can never be removed.
    Suggested fan sizes it would accept would be 40, 50, or 60 mm
    wide (preferribly 50 or 60, 40 is awfully small unless you don't
    mind higher RPM, noise) by 10-15mm thick. Of course any such
    solution will block the first PCI slot, and if a thick fan and
    tall heatsink, even the 2nd PCI slot. Blocking 2nd slot might be
    good compromise for a high-end video card in a gaming system, but
    for an older card it seems excessive.

    If you have a spare, small enough heatsink or are willing to
    saw/sand it down to size that might be an option, but if not,
    choose aftermarket 'sink/fan with thickest fan possible. Frankly
    I don't like any of them because they all use a proprietary fan
    mounting, so it's not possible to swap in a different fan for
    noise, cooling, or failure reasons. That is, unless you were
    lucky enough to have a spare fan.

    I "think" (not sure) that a Thermaltake Blue Orb will fit those.
    I've never tried it myself but thought I remembers others using
    one. There are more expensive, fancier heatsinks, but I find it
    hard to swallow paying $20 or more for a video card heatsink,
    especially on a video card that's now worth less than $50 (since
    it's used, with failed fan). Even so they do sometimes go on
    sale, with a Google search for "Geforce 4 TI heatsink" being the
    way to find them.

    Did you try lubing the current fan?
    Can you determine exactly what the fan is like, the dimensions of
    the blades and screw-down points on the plastic frame?
    I have a few old video card heatsink/fans, well, the cards are
    now old but the fans are barely used because first thing I did
    was to swap out that heatsink for something quieter and longer
    lasting, so they just sat in a drawer. I may have something that
    will fit your heatsink (metal portion), if the fan screws out and
    the mounting holes match up with the fans I have. I think I
    still have an unused Tennmax Lasagna around here too, but it
    might be the type that clips to a CPU, not the video card type
    (same thing but different clips, so it'd need some alternate
    method of mounting). I still don't recommend the Lasagna though,
    they were a novelty more than a good solution.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Falcon 1209" <falcon1209@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:OEpEc.4508$tU.777@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    > and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know
    if
    > its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with
    the
    > Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions
    are...
    > 1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    > 2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by
    2
    > "Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there
    isnt
    > a heat sink on this one)

    Is the card still under warranty? My BFG 4200 card's fan started to fail
    and BFG sent me a new card. They sent a new FX5900XT too. I couldn't
    believe it.

    B
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Falcon 1209 wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > My video card's (nVidia GeForce4 Ti 4200 by Chaintech) fan started buzzing
    > and its worrying me because I payed $130 for it 2 years ago. I dont know
    > if its something to be worried about so im looking to replace the fan with
    > the Lasagna A type fan from www.tennmax.com. So basically my 2 questions
    > are... 1. Is the buzzing a concern?
    > 2. Is the fan glued to the GPU? (It doesnt seem like it is. Its held in by
    > 2 "Push Pins".) Ive only heard of the heat sinks being glued on but there
    > isnt a heat sink on this one).

    There are numerous third-party heat sinks for the Ti series, just pick one
    and put it on and don't worry about it. It's been a very long time since
    any nvidia-based board came with a heat sink bonded to the GPU.

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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