Samsung 243t LCD Monitor - 2 Vertical Lines - Problem?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

Just purchased a 24" Samsung 243T LCD monitor. There are 2 faint
vertical lines running up and down right in the middle of the display.
I don't remember these when I initially plugged in, but noticed them a
few hours later. They are faint. You only seem to see them on darker
colors like blue and gray. I do not see them on a white background.

Is this a flaw with the monitor or it is designed this way. I thought
I remember earlier generation LCD's that had some kind of "wire" that
ran behind the display and could be seen.

I spent $1800 on this and don't want to keep it if it is a problem.

Thanks in advance.
5 answers Last reply
More about samsung 243t monitor vertical lines problem
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > Gregory <greg.wilder@insightbb.com> wrote:

    > Just purchased a 24" Samsung 243T LCD monitor.
    > There are 2 faint vertical lines running up and
    > down right in the middle of the display.

    You might create some wallpaper files, each at
    full-res and of a single color, such as:
    all-red.bmp
    all-blue.bmp
    all-green.bmp
    all-black.bmp
    all-white.bmp

    Load each in turn as the wallpaper, with all other
    stuff minimized (or use an image viewer with full-
    screen mode), and see if the problem is specific to
    a single color drive. If you have a jeweler's loupe,
    examine the affected color triads.

    With all-white.bmp engaged, you should see distinct
    R-G-B triads in black boxes. If you see anything
    else, it might be an artifact of how the panel was
    fabricated. If you see the absence of a color primary,
    suspect a defective panel (or graphics card).

    To rule out the graphics card, create 640x480 subsets
    of the bmps, wallpaper them, and let the monitor upscale
    them to fill the screen.

    > I thought I remember earlier generation LCD's
    > that had some kind of "wire" that
    > ran behind the display and could be seen.

    Prior to the deployment of FABs that could handle full-
    size LCD substrates, some early "large" LCDs might have
    been tiled from smaller panels, in TV "window wall"
    fashion, and these would have visible join lines.
    There's no excuse for that in a contemporary LCD.

    I'm no expert on this, but I don't know of any other
    reason for such lines.

    On aperture-grill CRTs (Trinitrons), of course, two
    horizontal lines are common, representing the shadow
    of the tension band wires that stablize the thousand
    or so vertical grill wires.

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    It's really a strange problem.

    I am pretty sure the lines were not there when I installed it this
    afternoon. I didn't notice it until several hours later.

    I have tried on 2 different PCs (both with nVidia card). Same problem.

    Downloaded latest nvidia driver. no help

    The lines are really starting to bug me. I do not want to spend almost
    $2k for something like this. But I need to know folks opinion. Bad
    monitor or is this the way they are supposed to look?

    Thanks....


    Bob Niland <email4rjn@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >> Gregory <greg.wilder@insightbb.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Just purchased a 24" Samsung 243T LCD monitor.
    >> There are 2 faint vertical lines running up and
    >> down right in the middle of the display.
    >
    >You might create some wallpaper files, each at
    >full-res and of a single color, such as:
    >all-red.bmp
    >all-blue.bmp
    >all-green.bmp
    >all-black.bmp
    >all-white.bmp
    >
    >Load each in turn as the wallpaper, with all other
    >stuff minimized (or use an image viewer with full-
    >screen mode), and see if the problem is specific to
    >a single color drive. If you have a jeweler's loupe,
    >examine the affected color triads.
    >
    >With all-white.bmp engaged, you should see distinct
    >R-G-B triads in black boxes. If you see anything
    >else, it might be an artifact of how the panel was
    >fabricated. If you see the absence of a color primary,
    >suspect a defective panel (or graphics card).
    >
    >To rule out the graphics card, create 640x480 subsets
    >of the bmps, wallpaper them, and let the monitor upscale
    >them to fill the screen.
    >
    >> I thought I remember earlier generation LCD's
    >> that had some kind of "wire" that
    >> ran behind the display and could be seen.
    >
    >Prior to the deployment of FABs that could handle full-
    >size LCD substrates, some early "large" LCDs might have
    >been tiled from smaller panels, in TV "window wall"
    >fashion, and these would have visible join lines.
    >There's no excuse for that in a contemporary LCD.
    >
    >I'm no expert on this, but I don't know of any other
    >reason for such lines.
    >
    >On aperture-grill CRTs (Trinitrons), of course, two
    >horizontal lines are common, representing the shadow
    >of the tension band wires that stablize the thousand
    >or so vertical grill wires.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    GS Wilder wrote:

    > It's really a strange problem.
    >
    > I am pretty sure the lines were not there when I installed it this
    > afternoon. I didn't notice it until several hours later.
    >
    > I have tried on 2 different PCs (both with nVidia card). Same problem.
    >
    > Downloaded latest nvidia driver. no help
    >
    > The lines are really starting to bug me. I do not want to spend almost
    > $2k for something like this. But I need to know folks opinion. Bad
    > monitor or is this the way they are supposed to look?

    If you don't have Powerstrip you might want to download it
    <http://entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm> and play with the resolution
    adjustment--it sounds like your video board might be running at a
    horizontal resolution just a little tiny bit different from the native
    resolution of the display, causing artifacts to appear in the form of the
    vertical lines you describe. Or it could just be that you have a defective
    monitor.
    >
    > Thanks....
    >
    >
    > Bob Niland <email4rjn@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> Gregory <greg.wilder@insightbb.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Just purchased a 24" Samsung 243T LCD monitor.
    >>> There are 2 faint vertical lines running up and
    >>> down right in the middle of the display.
    >>
    >>You might create some wallpaper files, each at
    >>full-res and of a single color, such as:
    >>all-red.bmp
    >>all-blue.bmp
    >>all-green.bmp
    >>all-black.bmp
    >>all-white.bmp
    >>
    >>Load each in turn as the wallpaper, with all other
    >>stuff minimized (or use an image viewer with full-
    >>screen mode), and see if the problem is specific to
    >>a single color drive. If you have a jeweler's loupe,
    >>examine the affected color triads.
    >>
    >>With all-white.bmp engaged, you should see distinct
    >>R-G-B triads in black boxes. If you see anything
    >>else, it might be an artifact of how the panel was
    >>fabricated. If you see the absence of a color primary,
    >>suspect a defective panel (or graphics card).
    >>
    >>To rule out the graphics card, create 640x480 subsets
    >>of the bmps, wallpaper them, and let the monitor upscale
    >>them to fill the screen.
    >>
    >>> I thought I remember earlier generation LCD's
    >>> that had some kind of "wire" that
    >>> ran behind the display and could be seen.
    >>
    >>Prior to the deployment of FABs that could handle full-
    >>size LCD substrates, some early "large" LCDs might have
    >>been tiled from smaller panels, in TV "window wall"
    >>fashion, and these would have visible join lines.
    >>There's no excuse for that in a contemporary LCD.
    >>
    >>I'm no expert on this, but I don't know of any other
    >>reason for such lines.
    >>
    >>On aperture-grill CRTs (Trinitrons), of course, two
    >>horizontal lines are common, representing the shadow
    >>of the tension band wires that stablize the thousand
    >>or so vertical grill wires.

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

    > If you don't have Powerstrip you might want to
    > download it <http://entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm>
    > and play with the resolution adjustment--it sounds
    > like your video board might be running at a
    > horizontal resolution just a little tiny bit different
    > from the native resolution of the display, causing
    > artifacts to appear in the form of the vertical
    > lines you describe.

    Switching to VGA (640x480) mode and letting the monitor
    upscale would also rule that out, by at least moving
    the artifact position.

    Is the connection DVI or HD15-analog, by the way?

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    I am using a DVI cable.

    I have connected to 3 different PC's (2 nvidia based, 1 ATI). Also
    went by CompUSA today and their floor model did not have the same
    lines on the display.

    Unfortunately, I will probably have to return to the mfg for a
    replacement. Newegg will not swap monitors.

    Thanks....
    Bob Niland <email4rjn@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >> J. Clarke <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> If you don't have Powerstrip you might want to
    >> download it <http://entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm>
    >> and play with the resolution adjustment--it sounds
    >> like your video board might be running at a
    >> horizontal resolution just a little tiny bit different
    >> from the native resolution of the display, causing
    >> artifacts to appear in the form of the vertical
    >> lines you describe.
    >
    >Switching to VGA (640x480) mode and letting the monitor
    >upscale would also rule that out, by at least moving
    >the artifact position.
    >
    >Is the connection DVI or HD15-analog, by the way?
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