Why are the surfaces of some LCD screens soft?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

I notice that the screens of two of my LCD displays are "soft"; that is,
they don't seem to be made of rigid glass, but of some sort of soft,
flexible plastic. If I press my fingertip lightly against the screen,
its influence on the image is obvious, implying that the screen is so
flexible that it indents beneath my finger.

What's the reason for this? Wouldn't it make more sense to put a rigid
class plate over the front of the screen to protect it?

The front of the screens is soft enough that I was able to eliminate a
hot pixel on one screen by "massaging" it gently with a fingertip (and
it never came back, fortunately).

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
8 answers Last reply
More about surfaces screens soft
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:n8a5s05tidf10veogekmm2ag5bpanpva4f@4ax.com...
    > I notice that the screens of two of my LCD displays are "soft"; that is,
    > they don't seem to be made of rigid glass, but of some sort of soft,
    > flexible plastic. If I press my fingertip lightly against the screen,
    > its influence on the image is obvious, implying that the screen is so
    > flexible that it indents beneath my finger.

    Many if not most panels will have an anti-glare film added
    as the "top" or "front" surface of the panel. There's little sense
    in putting a piece of polished glass over THAT, since it would
    defeat the purpose. The entire "top" substrate, glass, film, and
    all, of a typical LCD IS flexible to some degree, though, as the
    glass is very thin. Typical LCD glass these days is 0.7 mm thick,
    with some notebook panels getting down to about 0.4 mm and
    practically no one using glass more than about 1.1 mm thick.
    It WILL given under finger pressue. It's not recommended that
    you apply such pressure to an LCD screen, as the same sort
    of pressure which you noted can clear up some forms of
    defects can also cause them. (These sorts of problems generally
    result from a non-uniform distribution of spacers within the
    actual LC layer, which results in non-uniformity in the LC
    cell gap. That gap itself is generally on the order of a few microns.)

    Bob M.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Bob Myers writes:

    > It's not recommended that you apply such pressure to an
    > LCD screen, as the same sort of pressure which you noted
    > can clear up some forms of defects can also cause them.

    How does one clean an LCD screen? It was easy enough on CRTs, with
    their indestructible glass surface, but what about LCDs? They don't
    seem to have that magic attraction for dust that CRTs have, but they
    still gather dust eventually. The manual for my new LCD seems to
    indicate that I can clean it with a "soft cloth," but I am wary.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > Mxsmanic <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > How does one clean an LCD screen?

    Start with the manufacturer's recommendations. You
    might have to hit their web site to find them.

    > It was easy enough on CRTs, with their indestructible
    > glass surface, ...

    Whoa. Low-end CRTs may well be plain glass at the
    surface, but most mid-range and hi-end units have
    a fairly delicate anti-reflection coating, which is
    all too easy to damage or even entirely remove.

    > The manual for my new LCD seems to indicate that
    > I can clean it with a "soft cloth," but I am wary.

    Be wary, and don't rely on 3rd-party cleaning gear
    either. Most of the junk for cleaning CDs and CD
    players, for example, is just plain dangerous to
    both data and drive.

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > How does one clean an LCD screen? It was easy enough on CRTs, with
    > their indestructible glass surface, but what about LCDs? They don't
    > seem to have that magic attraction for dust that CRTs have, but they
    > still gather dust eventually. The manual for my new LCD seems to
    > indicate that I can clean it with a "soft cloth," but I am wary.

    To remove dust you can use a good feather duster.

    For more ostinate dirt buy a 3M Scotch Brite 2010 cloth.
    It's expensive for a cloth, but you can remove fingermarks
    using only some water.
    Be careful to don't leave the fingermarks for long time
    ore they would be irremediably fixed (!)
    I this and other difficult cases the right solvent to try is
    Isopropilic Alcohol.

    Greetings
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > Many if not most panels will have an anti-glare film added
    > as the "top" or "front" surface of the panel.
    [cut]

    Hello Bob!
    I can see you are always the number one... :-]

    What do you think about new LCD with
    hardware acceleration (overdrive)?
    Like this:
    http://www.eizo.com/products/lcd/l778/spec.asp

    You think this is an effective solution to reduce
    smearing or only a "lemon"? :-\

    Thanks

    (sorry for the intrusion)
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    SR2 writes:

    > Be careful to don't leave the fingermarks for long time
    > ore they would be irremediably fixed (!)

    What do you mean??

    > I this and other difficult cases the right solvent to try is
    > Isopropilic Alcohol.

    The instructions say never to use any type of alcohol.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > What do you mean??

    My english is a little bad.

    "fingermark" is correct?
    When you touch the monitor with the hands... (?)

    I seen that if you leave this dirt for long time
    (many months I think) it becomes very very
    difficult to clean.

    > The instructions say never to use any type of alcohol.
    Samsung recommends "Isopropilic Alcohol".
    But it may be that I've made a bad generalization... :-\

    I've used the 3M micro-fibre cloth for more than a
    year and never have need any other...
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Getting caught up after being computer-free over the holidays -
    sorry for the delay...

    >
    > What do you think about new LCD with
    > hardware acceleration (overdrive)?
    > Like this:
    > http://www.eizo.com/products/lcd/l778/spec.asp

    Overdrive is a legitimate ad very effective means of reducing
    LCD response times. In general, it involves hitting the subpixels
    in question "harder" (higher drive voltage) than would be expected
    from the target gray level on the first frame of drive, in order to
    get the LC molecules changing state more rapidly, and then
    getting them in to the proper state (with the correct drive
    voltage) on later frames. Done properly, it has basically no
    bad side-effects.

    Bob M.
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