BenQ 17" LCD Monitor

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

I bought a BenQ T701 LCD monitor from Micro Center and the specs say
1024x768 with 25 ms response time. However, when I did a google search on
the model it showed different specs. The photo looks exactly like my unit.

AUSTRALIA T701

http://www.i-tech.com.au/products/3607_BENQ_T701_17__LCD_MON_16MS_BLACK_1280.asp

AMERICA

http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=13468&vpn=T701&manufacture=BENQ


Are there two T701 models?
13 answers Last reply
More about benq monitor
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Gary" <GParent@rocketmail.com> wrote in message
    news:kx5Ad.15443$vF5.12654@trndny07...
    >I bought a BenQ T701 LCD monitor from Micro Center and the specs say
    > 1024x768 with 25 ms response time. However, when I did a google search on
    > the model it showed different specs. The photo looks exactly like my unit.
    >
    > AUSTRALIA T701
    >
    > http://www.i-tech.com.au/products/3607_BENQ_T701_17__LCD_MON_16MS_BLACK_1280.asp
    >
    > AMERICA
    >
    > http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=13468&vpn=T701&manufacture=BENQ
    >
    >
    > Are there two T701 models?
    >

    According to BenQ Australia, the T 701 is a 16ms screen

    http://www.benq.com.au/HomeShowProduct.asp?Prodid=353

    so I'd say the info from Micro Centre is wrong. NCIX is a good site and
    GENERALLY accurate. It's Canadian BTW...and there IS a difference!!

    What does it say on the Specs page of your manual?
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Barney Rubble" <nowhere@nothing.com> wrote in message news:816Ad.598485> >
    > so I'd say the info from Micro Centre is wrong. NCIX is a good site and
    > GENERALLY accurate. It's Canadian BTW...and there IS a difference!!
    >
    > What does it say on the Specs page of your manual?
    >
    >

    (1) The Quick Start Guide is for FP731/FP737s LCD Monitor, not T701!.

    (2) Manual is on CD. It lists the following models:

    FP531, FP731, FP931, FP737s, FP737s-D

    So, on paper and on CD, my model is not listed in what came with my LCD.
    Again, I purchased it from Micro Center and it was a special sale item. They
    sold out of them in 30 minutes, for $149 each after two rebates. Its not a
    fake, its a real BenQ. At this point, I have no idea what it is physically,
    since BenQ could have stenciled white lettering on any of their 17" models.

    In fact, the FP731 looks like my model. But I have to go on the T701 model
    that I purchased. Bottom line, I don't know.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Gary" <GParent@rocketmail.com> wrote in message
    news:JufAd.4729$PY6.4529@trndny02...
    >
    > "Barney Rubble" <nowhere@nothing.com> wrote in message news:816Ad.598485>
    > >
    >> so I'd say the info from Micro Centre is wrong. NCIX is a good site and
    >> GENERALLY accurate. It's Canadian BTW...and there IS a difference!!
    >>
    >> What does it say on the Specs page of your manual?
    >>
    >>
    >
    > (1) The Quick Start Guide is for FP731/FP737s LCD Monitor, not T701!.
    >
    > (2) Manual is on CD. It lists the following models:
    >
    > FP531, FP731, FP931, FP737s, FP737s-D
    >
    > So, on paper and on CD, my model is not listed in what came with my LCD.
    > Again, I purchased it from Micro Center and it was a special sale item.
    > They
    > sold out of them in 30 minutes, for $149 each after two rebates. Its not a
    > fake, its a real BenQ. At this point, I have no idea what it is
    > physically,
    > since BenQ could have stenciled white lettering on any of their 17"
    > models.
    >
    > In fact, the FP731 looks like my model. But I have to go on the T701 model
    > that I purchased. Bottom line, I don't know.
    >
    >
    >
    >OK..if there's no real support docs, what does it say on the monitor ITSELF
    >? There must be some identification on the back?
    If you're in doubt, email / phone Benq and ask them? If there's a serial
    number...surely they can tell you from that? ....

    At that price does it REALLY matter?
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Barney Rubble" <nowhere@nothing.com> wrote in message
    news:8zmAd.583400$Pl.565101@pd7tw1no...

    I checked the label on the box and it says T701, but it also has Q7T3, below
    it. Go figure. Here is the exact monitor that I have, selling on EBAY:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=29502&item=5151908519&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

    Also found this:

    http://210.202.108.82/p4-2.asp?idx=3022


    LCD Monitor Specs:

    Model Name Q7T3
    LCD Size 17"
    Display Area 13.3" x 10.6"
    Brightness 260 cd/m2
    Contrast 450:1
    Response Time 25 ms
    Pixel Pitch (mm) 0.264
    Viewing Angle (H/V Degrees) 140/130
    True Panel Resolution (Max.) 1280 x 1024
    Display Color Palettes 16.2 million (With Dithering)
    Input Signal D-sub
    Integrated Speakers No
    Pivot No
    Swivel No
    i Key Auto Calibration Yes
    OSD Controls Yes
    VESA Wall Mounting Support Yes (100x100mm)
    Digital Photo Frame -
    Low Radiation TCO99
    Kensington Lock Support Yes
    Horizontal Frequency (Max) KHz 31 - 81
    Vertical Frequency (Max) Hz 56 - 76
    Video Bandwidth (MHz) 25 - 135
    Power Supply Built-in
    Power Consumption (Max.) 45W
    Casing Color Black

    Net Weight 9.7lbs
    Dimensions (W x H x D) 14.8" x 14.5" x 6.1"
    Gross Weight
    12.0 lbs
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Gary" <GParent@rocketmail.com> wrote in message
    news:auNAd.5994$PY6.34@trndny02...
    > "Barney Rubble" <nowhere@nothing.com> wrote in message
    > news:8zmAd.583400$Pl.565101@pd7tw1no...
    >
    > I checked the label on the box and it says T701, but it also has Q7T3,
    > below
    > it. Go figure. Here is the exact monitor that I have, selling on EBAY:
    >
    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=29502&item=5151908519&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
    >
    > Also found this:
    >
    > http://210.202.108.82/p4-2.asp?idx=3022
    >
    >
    >
    > LCD Monitor Specs:
    >
    > Model Name Q7T3
    > LCD Size 17"
    > Display Area 13.3" x 10.6"
    > Brightness 260 cd/m2
    > Contrast 450:1
    > Response Time 25 ms
    > Pixel Pitch (mm) 0.264
    > Viewing Angle (H/V Degrees) 140/130
    > True Panel Resolution (Max.) 1280 x 1024
    > Display Color Palettes 16.2 million (With Dithering)
    > Input Signal D-sub
    > Integrated Speakers No
    > Pivot No
    > Swivel No
    > i Key Auto Calibration Yes
    > OSD Controls Yes
    > VESA Wall Mounting Support Yes (100x100mm)
    > Digital Photo Frame -
    > Low Radiation TCO99
    > Kensington Lock Support Yes
    > Horizontal Frequency (Max) KHz 31 - 81
    > Vertical Frequency (Max) Hz 56 - 76
    > Video Bandwidth (MHz) 25 - 135
    > Power Supply Built-in
    > Power Consumption (Max.) 45W
    > Casing Color Black
    >
    > Net Weight 9.7lbs
    > Dimensions (W x H x D) 14.8" x 14.5" x 6.1"
    > Gross Weight
    > 12.0 lbs
    >
    >
    Well after all this...are you happy with it? If it REALLY bugs you call BenQ
    directly. Seems the only sensible solution.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Barney Rubble" <nowhere@nothing.com> wrote in message
    news:Gv1Bd.610352$Pl.424993@pd7tw1no...
    > Well after all this...are you happy with it? If it REALLY bugs you call
    BenQ
    > directly. Seems the only sensible solution.

    Its my first LCD monitor. Funds were tight and I am happy I got this new for
    $149. The specs are very good but if I could change one thing it would be a
    faster response time. Not for games but for video editing. Still, its great
    compared to a 19" NEC that went white line on me. Besides, I have been
    reading about some giant leaps in new LCD technology coming in 2005. Like no
    fluorescent tube but LEDs for the light source, and other technologies from
    Samsung and LG. I figure that I will get something far superior in late
    2005, or early 2006. No hurry.

    A couple of question, if you don't mind:

    (1) Do these LCD monitors (mine, actually) have the ability with their
    analog interfaces to change the refresh rate and have the monitor respond?

    (2) What is the aspect ratio of a LCD monitor pixel. Is it square? Does the
    geometry depend on the resolution of the display. (e.g.. 1024x768 vs.
    1280x1024)?

    Why? I am now running at 1024x768 but I believe the native resolution is
    really 1280x1024 and I want to make sure that circles look like circles and
    not ovals.

    Thanks,

    Gary
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    I just purchased a BENQ T701 from Micro Center as well and I used the
    FP531 driver from the CD it came with it now says "unknown monitor" in
    Device Manager. I looked and BENQ's website does have the T701
    drivers. I have not tried to update them but will let you guys know
    what happens. I also was suspicious with the different specs listed. I
    read that the response time is either 25 or 16ms - what gives? Does
    anyone have the phone number handy?

    TommyRox
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    I just got off of the phone and was told that the T701 has a 25ms
    response time and uses the FP531 or PF731 driver.

    TommyRox
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    I took it back and got a 19" Proview

    TommyRox
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    While we're talking about response times, what's the average response
    time for a CRT Monitor? I was thinking about going LCD but as my PC is
    used primarily for games this might not be a good way to go. I've heard
    Benq has released a 19" LCD with a 12ms response time but I think it'd
    be a bit pricey for me.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Dr Craniax" <drcraniax@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1106627547.192504.105710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > While we're talking about response times, what's the average response
    > time for a CRT Monitor?

    There's really no good way to answer this question - CRTs and
    LCDs are VERY different beasts in this regard. In the LCD, rows
    of pixels are written (and the pixels in them turned on or off, or at
    least "more on" or "more off") more or less simultaneously, and
    then stay in the proper state (again, more or less) until re-written
    on the next frame time. The "response time" specs tell you how
    quickly the LC material changes to its new state after the video
    information is written to the pixels. (Still somewhat of an over-
    simplification, but it will have to do.) This means that the LCD is
    a pretty stable light source, except for those times of transition when
    a pixel is changing state.

    On the other hand, a CRT works by scanning an electron beam
    over a phosphor screen, lighting up tiny areas of that screen to the
    proper intensity and then moving on. (These "tiny areas" are NOT
    exactly "pixels," but at least for this comparison if it help you to think
    of pixels being written, be my guest. We can correct that mis-
    understanding later if need be...:-)) When struck by the beam,
    the phosphor lights essentially "instantly" - and then the question is
    how long it will keep emitting light after the beam has moved on.
    This is described in a phosphor specification known as "persistence,"
    and it is surprisingly short for standard color CRT phosphors. For
    these, the phosphor is down to less than 10% of its original light output
    just a few hundred microseconds (at most! - and the persistence is
    NOT the same across all three colors) after the beam is removed
    from a given area. You would think that this would result in a horrible-
    looking display, but the phosphor actually emits a LOT of light in that
    short time, and then the eye integrates those high-amplitude pulses of
    light between frames to give the illusion of a stable image. (If you
    don't make the pulses often enough, though, the eye can and will pick
    up on the fact that this isn't really a stable light source - which is where
    "flicker" comes from.)

    The bottom line is that LCD "response time" and CRT "persistence"
    values are in no way comparable, and the two technologies will
    always have a different "look" just due to the fact that one IS
    providing a fairly constant, steady light output during the frame times
    and the other most definitely is not. This shows up most clearly in
    comparing the appearance of motion video on the two. To help the
    situation, many LCD displays are starting to insert "black time" (i.e.,
    set the whole screen to black) in between the video frames, to give
    a more pleasing or "CRT-like" appearance - and this, or various
    other methods, would still be needed to provide this appearance
    even if the LCD could provide a truly zero response time!


    Bob M.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    > Bob Myers <nospamplease@address.invalid> wrote:

    > ... many LCD displays are starting to insert "black time"
    > (i.e., set the whole screen to black) in between the
    > video frames, ...

    I trust this experiment is restricted to LCD TVs.

    > ... to give a more pleasing or "CRT-like" appearance ...

    That's debatable. I rather prefer the "stable emitter until
    new data arrives" paradigm of LCD (for computer use).

    Had LCD arrived prior to CRT, do we suppose that LCD
    would seek to emulate the artifacts of CRT?

    On computer monitors, at the very least, I would assume
    that "black time" would require upping the recommended
    raw signal rate from the typical 60Hz to more CRT-like
    ergo rates (which will be a major issue above 1920x1200,
    since 60Hz maxes-out a single-link DVI-D) ...

    .... or is the LCD merely performing a local re-flash at
    an arbitrary rate, much like multi-bladed shutters do
    in film projection?

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Bob Niland" <email4rjn@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:opsk6vcwzgft8z8r@news.individual.net...
    > > Bob Myers <nospamplease@address.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > > ... many LCD displays are starting to insert "black time"
    > > (i.e., set the whole screen to black) in between the
    > > video frames, ...
    >
    > I trust this experiment is restricted to LCD TVs.

    So far, although it may trickle down to monitors
    eventually.

    >
    > > ... to give a more pleasing or "CRT-like" appearance ...
    >
    > That's debatable. I rather prefer the "stable emitter until
    > new data arrives" paradigm of LCD (for computer use).

    Sorry, Bob, but I think you're worried over nothing here.
    Inserting black time the way it is being done in the latest LCD
    TVs does not necessarily result in the same sort of flicker
    problem, even at 60 Hz frame rates, as seen in CRTs.

    Remember, with the CRT you are talking about what is in
    reality an EXTREMELY bright but short-duration light
    source; most of the screen is actually nearly dark most of the
    time. Putting a few milliseconds of black into every LCD
    frame time isn't quite the same thing, and does result in a
    more convincing portrayal of motion than otherwise would be
    the case. There are also other techniques being tried, but the
    bottom line is - don't knock it until you've seen it for yourself.


    Bob M..
Ask a new question

Read More

Graphics Cards BenQ LCD Monitor Graphics