Running an old computer with a new monitor

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output jack?

(I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
pin video card)

Thanks.

Meirman
--
If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.
Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
8 answers Last reply
More about running computer monitor
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    meirman wrote:

    > Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a
    > new monitor, with a 15-pin connector, to a laptop
    > computer that has a 9-pin output jack?

    No snap answer is possible, as it depends on what
    video signal standard that old port was intended
    to drive.

    If it's a common historical PC digital video signal
    (MDA, CGA, MCGA, EGA, PGA, 8514/A), the answer is NO.
    (and no, these can't be adapted to DVI-D either)

    If it's some proprietary video signal, it may also
    be a lost cause.

    If it's an analog signal (VGA, XGA, SVGA or later),
    then a simple adaptor may be possible.

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    What computer has a 9 pin output jack for video ?
    Are you sure it's not the COM port ?

    Tal

    "meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:ikha615gjt22fk8j0aar0nnb5hj1b6svgp@4ax.com...
    > Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
    > a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    >
    > (I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
    > pin video card)
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Meirman
    > --
    > If emailing, please let me know whether
    > or not you are posting the same letter.
    > Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on 19 Apr 2005 15:49:21 -0700 "rjn"
    <email4rjn@yahoo.com> posted:

    >meirman wrote:
    >
    >> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a
    >> new monitor, with a 15-pin connector, to a laptop
    >> computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    >
    >No snap answer is possible, as it depends on what
    >video signal standard that old port was intended
    >to drive.
    >
    >If it's a common historical PC digital video signal
    >(MDA, CGA, MCGA, EGA, PGA, 8514/A), the answer is NO.
    >(and no, these can't be adapted to DVI-D either)
    >
    >If it's some proprietary video signal, it may also
    >be a lost cause.
    >
    >If it's an analog signal (VGA, XGA, SVGA or later),
    >then a simple adaptor may be possible.

    Well, I'm not sure what it is.

    This was a general question and I also had a particular computer in
    mind, a Bromwell B300 that a friend asked me to help him with.

    He doesn't expect it to work again. He just wants to get his personal
    data off of it. I haven't found out much about the computer except
    that it ran or could run Windows 3.0.

    I put more details in my reply to Tal's reply, next.

    Thanks.

    Meirman
    --
    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.
    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on Wed, 20 Apr 2005 16:07:45 +0200
    "Tal Fuchs" <fuchs_t@bezeqint.net> posted:

    >What computer has a 9 pin output jack for video ?
    >Are you sure it's not the COM port ?

    Ooooo. That's a good point. Well, below I realize that I am sure it
    is the video port.

    It's a Bromwell B300 laptop. Looking for specs, etc, I found one for
    sale on Ebay and one on an auction site like Ebay, and the ad said
    that it ran Windows 3.0.

    The LCD? screen just shows some horizontal lines at start-up, and then
    goes blank. So I plugged in an old monitor of mine.

    Now, I'm using iirc an EGA (or maybe VGA or CGA-?) monitor with a
    9-pin plug connected to the 9-pin jack, and I can see it start booting
    by the lights: the floppy drive lights up, the hard drive lights up,
    and then some "text" appears on the monitor.

    It's illegible. It's about 1 1/3 lines long, even though I'm sure
    it's really less than a line. My monitor worked fine a few years ago
    when it was connected to an AT computer, but now if I adjust the
    vertical hold, I can get it stable but only with 3 copies of the same
    text, one above the other.

    Another line or two of "text" appears as the probable booting
    continues. All of the "text" is in 3, maybe 4 colors, blue, red,
    white, and maybe light green. The letters are block-shaped.


    This is the immediate problem. My previous question was a general one
    -- Do I have to keep a CGA or VGA monitor around for testing old
    computers? -- and it relates to a specific question that applies here
    -- maybe I should test this computer with a SVGA monitor? Of course
    I have one of those, but they have 15-pin plugs.

    >Tal
    >
    >"meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    >news:ikha615gjt22fk8j0aar0nnb5hj1b6svgp@4ax.com...
    >> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
    >> a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    >>
    >> (I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
    >> pin video card)
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Meirman
    >> --
    >> If emailing, please let me know whether
    >> or not you are posting the same letter.
    >> Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    >


    Meirman
    --
    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.
    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    meirman wrote:

    > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on Wed, 20 Apr 2005 16:07:45 +0200
    > "Tal Fuchs" <fuchs_t@bezeqint.net> posted:
    >
    >>What computer has a 9 pin output jack for video ?
    >>Are you sure it's not the COM port ?
    >
    > Ooooo. That's a good point. Well, below I realize that I am sure it
    > is the video port.

    The 15 pin high density connector came in with VGA. Prior to that the IBM
    PC family had a 9-pin connector the same size as the 15-pin.

    > It's a Bromwell B300 laptop. Looking for specs, etc, I found one for
    > sale on Ebay and one on an auction site like Ebay, and the ad said
    > that it ran Windows 3.0.
    >
    > The LCD? screen just shows some horizontal lines at start-up, and then
    > goes blank. So I plugged in an old monitor of mine.
    >
    > Now, I'm using iirc an EGA (or maybe VGA or CGA-?) monitor with a
    > 9-pin plug connected to the 9-pin jack, and I can see it start booting
    > by the lights: the floppy drive lights up, the hard drive lights up,
    > and then some "text" appears on the monitor.
    >
    > It's illegible. It's about 1 1/3 lines long, even though I'm sure
    > it's really less than a line. My monitor worked fine a few years ago
    > when it was connected to an AT computer, but now if I adjust the
    > vertical hold, I can get it stable but only with 3 copies of the same
    > text, one above the other.
    >
    > Another line or two of "text" appears as the probable booting
    > continues. All of the "text" is in 3, maybe 4 colors, blue, red,
    > white, and maybe light green. The letters are block-shaped.
    >
    >
    > This is the immediate problem. My previous question was a general one
    > -- Do I have to keep a CGA or VGA monitor around for testing old
    > computers? -- and it relates to a specific question that applies here
    > -- maybe I should test this computer with a SVGA monitor? Of course
    > I have one of those, but they have 15-pin plugs.

    First, the machine you have if it has 9-pin video does not have any kind of
    VGA. It could have EGA, CGA, or something proprietary. The symptoms
    you're describing are the classic ones of a mismatch in timing between the
    monitor and the display adapter. It may be that your monitor is
    fixed-frequency (either single or with several to choose from) and
    incapable of synchronizing with the display adapter in the computer or it
    may be that the monitor's synchronization mechanism has failed. Or of
    course it may be that the display adapter is fried.

    Now as for keeping a monitor on hand for dealing with old computers, yes, a
    good digital (in the sense of the CGA/EGA era, not a modern DVI monitor)
    autosynchronous monitor would be a very good thing to have if you routinely
    deal with _very_ old computers. The trouble is finding a good one that
    still works. My favorite was a Roland model the number of which escapes
    me--it locked onto everything I ever tried to throw at it. But it also
    died long ago and I don't see any on ebay.

    I don't think any current monitors can handle the old digital
    signalling--when VGA was new most autosynchronous monitors that handled VGA
    could but that was a long time ago.

    >>Tal
    >>
    >>"meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    >>news:ikha615gjt22fk8j0aar0nnb5hj1b6svgp@4ax.com...
    >>> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
    >>> a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    >>>
    >>> (I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
    >>> pin video card)
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>> Meirman
    >>> --
    >>> If emailing, please let me know whether
    >>> or not you are posting the same letter.
    >>> Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    >>
    >
    >
    > Meirman
    > --
    > If emailing, please let me know whether
    > or not you are posting the same letter.
    > Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Why not getting out the HDD to another machine and trashing forever this old
    computer ?
    I think you will have much more luck with this then trying to find an old
    CGA monitor ;)

    Tal

    "meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:23af61932vbjvp3b0lara0eaetrt8vlrqj@4ax.com...
    > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on 19 Apr 2005 15:49:21 -0700 "rjn"
    > <email4rjn@yahoo.com> posted:
    >
    >>meirman wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a
    >>> new monitor, with a 15-pin connector, to a laptop
    >>> computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    >>
    >>No snap answer is possible, as it depends on what
    >>video signal standard that old port was intended
    >>to drive.
    >>
    >>If it's a common historical PC digital video signal
    >>(MDA, CGA, MCGA, EGA, PGA, 8514/A), the answer is NO.
    >>(and no, these can't be adapted to DVI-D either)
    >>
    >>If it's some proprietary video signal, it may also
    >>be a lost cause.
    >>
    >>If it's an analog signal (VGA, XGA, SVGA or later),
    >>then a simple adaptor may be possible.
    >
    > Well, I'm not sure what it is.
    >
    > This was a general question and I also had a particular computer in
    > mind, a Bromwell B300 that a friend asked me to help him with.
    >
    > He doesn't expect it to work again. He just wants to get his personal
    > data off of it. I haven't found out much about the computer except
    > that it ran or could run Windows 3.0.
    >
    > I put more details in my reply to Tal's reply, next.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Meirman
    > --
    > If emailing, please let me know whether
    > or not you are posting the same letter.
    > Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:d48ecf02un8@news2.newsguy.com...
    > meirman wrote:
    >
    > > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on Wed, 20 Apr 2005 16:07:45 +0200
    > > "Tal Fuchs" <fuchs_t@bezeqint.net> posted:
    > >
    > >>What computer has a 9 pin output jack for video ?
    > >>Are you sure it's not the COM port ?
    > >
    > > Ooooo. That's a good point. Well, below I realize that I am sure it
    > > is the video port.
    >
    > The 15 pin high density connector came in with VGA. Prior to that the IBM
    > PC family had a 9-pin connector the same size as the 15-pin.
    >
    > > It's a Bromwell B300 laptop. Looking for specs, etc, I found one for
    > > sale on Ebay and one on an auction site like Ebay, and the ad said
    > > that it ran Windows 3.0.
    > >
    > > The LCD? screen just shows some horizontal lines at start-up, and then
    > > goes blank. So I plugged in an old monitor of mine.
    > >
    > > Now, I'm using iirc an EGA (or maybe VGA or CGA-?) monitor with a
    > > 9-pin plug connected to the 9-pin jack, and I can see it start booting
    > > by the lights: the floppy drive lights up, the hard drive lights up,
    > > and then some "text" appears on the monitor.
    > >
    > > It's illegible. It's about 1 1/3 lines long, even though I'm sure
    > > it's really less than a line. My monitor worked fine a few years ago
    > > when it was connected to an AT computer, but now if I adjust the
    > > vertical hold, I can get it stable but only with 3 copies of the same
    > > text, one above the other.
    > >
    > > Another line or two of "text" appears as the probable booting
    > > continues. All of the "text" is in 3, maybe 4 colors, blue, red,
    > > white, and maybe light green. The letters are block-shaped.
    > >
    > >
    > > This is the immediate problem. My previous question was a general one
    > > -- Do I have to keep a CGA or VGA monitor around for testing old
    > > computers? -- and it relates to a specific question that applies here
    > > -- maybe I should test this computer with a SVGA monitor? Of course
    > > I have one of those, but they have 15-pin plugs.
    >
    > First, the machine you have if it has 9-pin video does not have any kind
    of
    > VGA. It could have EGA, CGA, or something proprietary. The symptoms
    > you're describing are the classic ones of a mismatch in timing between the
    > monitor and the display adapter. It may be that your monitor is
    > fixed-frequency (either single or with several to choose from) and
    > incapable of synchronizing with the display adapter in the computer or it
    > may be that the monitor's synchronization mechanism has failed. Or of
    > course it may be that the display adapter is fried.
    >
    > Now as for keeping a monitor on hand for dealing with old computers, yes,
    a
    > good digital (in the sense of the CGA/EGA era, not a modern DVI monitor)
    > autosynchronous monitor would be a very good thing to have if you
    routinely
    > deal with _very_ old computers. The trouble is finding a good one that
    > still works. My favorite was a Roland model the number of which escapes
    > me--it locked onto everything I ever tried to throw at it. But it also
    > died long ago and I don't see any on ebay.
    >
    > I don't think any current monitors can handle the old digital
    > signalling--when VGA was new most autosynchronous monitors that handled
    VGA
    > could but that was a long time ago.
    >
    > >>Tal
    > >>
    > >>"meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    > >>news:ikha615gjt22fk8j0aar0nnb5hj1b6svgp@4ax.com...
    > >>> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
    > >>> a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output jack?
    > >>>
    > >>> (I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
    > >>> pin video card)
    > >>>
    > >>> Thanks.
    > >>>
    > >>> Meirman
    > >>> --
    > >>> If emailing, please let me know whether
    > >>> or not you are posting the same letter.
    > >>> Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > > Meirman
    > > --
    > > If emailing, please let me know whether
    > > or not you are posting the same letter.
    > > Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    >
    > --
    > --John
    > to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    > (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

    Just to add what has already been correctly stated - the 9 pin will be
    either CGA or EGA, and indeed just about every monitor supporting
    VGA will not scan down to those frequencies.
    CGA was 15.7 kHz, and I think EGA was 21 kHz.
    I think there was even a MGA (Monochrome) but that stuff has really
    faded from the ole noggin.

    Perhaps some TV type of product can sync to the CGA, *if* that's
    what the machine puts out, but you still have the challenge of mating
    up the proper connection. Also, most TV products still want encoded
    dolor, and C/E GA used RGB.

    If you could find one of the old original NEC multi-sync monitors, it
    should work - but how long will it live???

    Looks pretty futile, overall, from this perspective.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Not Gimpy Anymore wrote:

    > "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:d48ecf02un8@news2.newsguy.com...
    >> meirman wrote:
    >>
    >> > In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video on Wed, 20 Apr 2005 16:07:45 +0200
    >> > "Tal Fuchs" <fuchs_t@bezeqint.net> posted:
    >> >
    >> >>What computer has a 9 pin output jack for video ?
    >> >>Are you sure it's not the COM port ?
    >> >
    >> > Ooooo. That's a good point. Well, below I realize that I am sure it
    >> > is the video port.
    >>
    >> The 15 pin high density connector came in with VGA. Prior to that the
    >> IBM PC family had a 9-pin connector the same size as the 15-pin.
    >>
    >> > It's a Bromwell B300 laptop. Looking for specs, etc, I found one for
    >> > sale on Ebay and one on an auction site like Ebay, and the ad said
    >> > that it ran Windows 3.0.
    >> >
    >> > The LCD? screen just shows some horizontal lines at start-up, and then
    >> > goes blank. So I plugged in an old monitor of mine.
    >> >
    >> > Now, I'm using iirc an EGA (or maybe VGA or CGA-?) monitor with a
    >> > 9-pin plug connected to the 9-pin jack, and I can see it start booting
    >> > by the lights: the floppy drive lights up, the hard drive lights up,
    >> > and then some "text" appears on the monitor.
    >> >
    >> > It's illegible. It's about 1 1/3 lines long, even though I'm sure
    >> > it's really less than a line. My monitor worked fine a few years ago
    >> > when it was connected to an AT computer, but now if I adjust the
    >> > vertical hold, I can get it stable but only with 3 copies of the same
    >> > text, one above the other.
    >> >
    >> > Another line or two of "text" appears as the probable booting
    >> > continues. All of the "text" is in 3, maybe 4 colors, blue, red,
    >> > white, and maybe light green. The letters are block-shaped.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > This is the immediate problem. My previous question was a general one
    >> > -- Do I have to keep a CGA or VGA monitor around for testing old
    >> > computers? -- and it relates to a specific question that applies here
    >> > -- maybe I should test this computer with a SVGA monitor? Of course
    >> > I have one of those, but they have 15-pin plugs.
    >>
    >> First, the machine you have if it has 9-pin video does not have any kind
    > of
    >> VGA. It could have EGA, CGA, or something proprietary. The symptoms
    >> you're describing are the classic ones of a mismatch in timing between
    >> the
    >> monitor and the display adapter. It may be that your monitor is
    >> fixed-frequency (either single or with several to choose from) and
    >> incapable of synchronizing with the display adapter in the computer or it
    >> may be that the monitor's synchronization mechanism has failed. Or of
    >> course it may be that the display adapter is fried.
    >>
    >> Now as for keeping a monitor on hand for dealing with old computers, yes,
    > a
    >> good digital (in the sense of the CGA/EGA era, not a modern DVI monitor)
    >> autosynchronous monitor would be a very good thing to have if you
    > routinely
    >> deal with _very_ old computers. The trouble is finding a good one that
    >> still works. My favorite was a Roland model the number of which escapes
    >> me--it locked onto everything I ever tried to throw at it. But it also
    >> died long ago and I don't see any on ebay.
    >>
    >> I don't think any current monitors can handle the old digital
    >> signalling--when VGA was new most autosynchronous monitors that handled
    > VGA
    >> could but that was a long time ago.
    >>
    >> >>Tal
    >> >>
    >> >>"meirman" <meirman@invalid.com> wrote in message
    >> >>news:ikha615gjt22fk8j0aar0nnb5hj1b6svgp@4ax.com...
    >> >>> Is there an adapter that will allow me to connect a new monitor, with
    >> >>> a 15-pin connector, to a laptop computer that has a 9-pin output
    >> >>> jack?
    >> >>>
    >> >>> (I have an adaptor to do the opposite, use a 9-pin monitor with a 15
    >> >>> pin video card)
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Thanks.
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Meirman
    >> >>> --
    >> >>> If emailing, please let me know whether
    >> >>> or not you are posting the same letter.
    >> >>> Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Meirman
    >> > --
    >> > If emailing, please let me know whether
    >> > or not you are posting the same letter.
    >> > Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
    >>
    >> --
    >> --John
    >> to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    >> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    >
    > Just to add what has already been correctly stated - the 9 pin will be
    > either CGA or EGA, and indeed just about every monitor supporting
    > VGA will not scan down to those frequencies.
    > CGA was 15.7 kHz, and I think EGA was 21 kHz.
    > I think there was even a MGA (Monochrome) but that stuff has really
    > faded from the ole noggin.

    Even if they did scan that low, prior to VGA the signalling used on the IBM
    PC was digital, not analog--so the monitor would also have to be able to
    handle that.

    There was an IBM "Black and white" board (that was the actuall marking on
    the board) commonly called the "Monochrome Display Adapter" although that
    was never official IBM terminology that was text-only and a third part
    graphic version from Hercules that went through a number of variations, and
    in addition the EGA adapter could output to a monochrome monitor.

    > Perhaps some TV type of product can sync to the CGA, *if* that's
    > what the machine puts out, but you still have the challenge of mating
    > up the proper connection. Also, most TV products still want encoded
    > dolor, and C/E GA used RGB.

    The "real" CGA had an composite output--to use a TV from the 9-pin connector
    you'd need a transcoder.

    > If you could find one of the old original NEC multi-sync monitors, it
    > should work - but how long will it live???

    The NECs tended to be short-lived in my experience--I'd be surprised if he
    found one working. I went through a couple of them myself. I think it's
    more likely that he'll find a working CGA, EGA, or IBM monochrome display
    than a multisynch.

    > Looks pretty futile, overall, from this perspective.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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