SHARP 37" LCD monitor has horrible shadow

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

I've had time finally to get back to the LCD display. Bob and John
suggested the extra-long VGA cable as the culprit. Sure enough with a
shorter cable connected the ghosting/shadow problem is solved.

We have no choice but to use about 20 feet of VGA cable on this
particular screen. Is ghosting a common problem with this length of
cable, or can I expect a better picture with decent quality cable?

Plastic Man
8 answers Last reply
More about sharp monitor horrible shadow
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Plastic Man wrote:

    > I've had time finally to get back to the LCD display. Bob and John
    > suggested the extra-long VGA cable as the culprit. Sure enough with a
    > shorter cable connected the ghosting/shadow problem is solved.
    >
    > We have no choice but to use about 20 feet of VGA cable on this
    > particular screen. Is ghosting a common problem with this length of
    > cable, or can I expect a better picture with decent quality cable?

    A really good cable with impedences perfectly mathched might do the job.

    Alternatively, check out <http://www.gefen.com>.

    > Plastic Man

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "Plastic Man" <plastic_man1968@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:1125485886.123710.113230@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    > I've had time finally to get back to the LCD display. Bob and John
    > suggested the extra-long VGA cable as the culprit. Sure enough with a
    > shorter cable connected the ghosting/shadow problem is solved.
    >
    > We have no choice but to use about 20 feet of VGA cable on this
    > particular screen. Is ghosting a common problem with this length of
    > cable, or can I expect a better picture with decent quality cable?
    >
    > Plastic Man
    >

    Long cables are DEFINITELY the culprit - the transit times extend
    to "multi-pixel" level, which significantly increases the probability of
    ghosting due to impedance discontinuities.
    Problem is SOME of the discontinuities are NOT inside the cable,
    but where the cable connects - so getting a "super cable" will not be
    any help, as the connectors are NOT likely to be "super".
    You may look into an "active driver" (AKA KVM) if you really
    need to have the 20 ft of cable. Even then it's suggested to arrange
    a trial if possible to see if it helps the ghosting. Sorry, I have no
    direct experience with KVMs but their intent is exactly for the
    application you mention.

    HTH,
    HGA
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    The maximum recommended length for high quality VGA cable is 10 feet.
    Otherwise you experience image corruption.

    --
    DaveW
    "Plastic Man" <plastic_man1968@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:1125485886.123710.113230@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    > I've had time finally to get back to the LCD display. Bob and John
    > suggested the extra-long VGA cable as the culprit. Sure enough with a
    > shorter cable connected the ghosting/shadow problem is solved.
    >
    > We have no choice but to use about 20 feet of VGA cable on this
    > particular screen. Is ghosting a common problem with this length of
    > cable, or can I expect a better picture with decent quality cable?
    >
    > Plastic Man
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:df4aeh12hsk@news3.newsguy.com...
    > Plastic Man wrote:
    >
    > > I've had time finally to get back to the LCD display. Bob and John
    > > suggested the extra-long VGA cable as the culprit. Sure enough with a
    > > shorter cable connected the ghosting/shadow problem is solved.
    > >
    > > We have no choice but to use about 20 feet of VGA cable on this
    > > particular screen. Is ghosting a common problem with this length of
    > > cable, or can I expect a better picture with decent quality cable?
    >
    > A really good cable with impedences perfectly mathched might do the job.

    Agreed. And I want to add that it's not really the length of the
    cable that's the problem here, it's the impedance mismatch at
    either end. The added cable length really just introduces more delay,
    which shifts the position of the reflection (the "ghost" image) farther
    to the right of the edge that caused it in the first place, and thus
    generally makes that reflection more visible and objectionable.
    A better cable can help, but mostly from the improvement that
    you're likely to see in the quality of the connector attachment at
    either end (cheap VGA cables often have truly hideous connectors,
    which have been attached to the cable itself with leads flying all
    over the place, making for a really bad impedance discontinuity).
    If, on the other hand, the mismatch is actually at the monitor input
    (and the graphics card - it takes two bounces to make the ghost
    visible!), then a better cable might actually make the thing look
    worse (less loss in the cable making the reflection more visible)!

    Bob M.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    DaveW wrote:

    > The maximum recommended length for high quality VGA cable is 10 feet.
    > Otherwise you experience image corruption.

    _May_ experience. It is not certain.


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:df5h4e07tg@news2.newsguy.com...
    > DaveW wrote:
    >
    > > The maximum recommended length for high quality VGA cable is 10 feet.
    > > Otherwise you experience image corruption.
    >
    > _May_ experience. It is not certain.

    Seconded - and it has very little to do with the length of the
    cable (which, with any decent cable - and I mean the basic
    cable stock itself, the "wires" - is basically just a loss
    issue) relative to the impact of the connectors and the
    quality of their termination (attachment) to the cable.

    For one data point - I have successfully run what were
    essentially "VGA" signals, at 1280 x 1024 pixels, over
    100 METERS of cable - but it was Really Truly Very Nice
    Cable, and I did NOT use ordinary VGA connectors to do this...

    Bob M.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    Bob Myers wrote:

    >
    > "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:df5h4e07tg@news2.newsguy.com...
    >> DaveW wrote:
    >>
    >> > The maximum recommended length for high quality VGA cable is 10 feet.
    >> > Otherwise you experience image corruption.
    >>
    >> _May_ experience. It is not certain.
    >
    > Seconded - and it has very little to do with the length of the
    > cable (which, with any decent cable - and I mean the basic
    > cable stock itself, the "wires" - is basically just a loss
    > issue) relative to the impact of the connectors and the
    > quality of their termination (attachment) to the cable.
    >
    > For one data point - I have successfully run what were
    > essentially "VGA" signals, at 1280 x 1024 pixels, over
    > 100 METERS of cable - but it was Really Truly Very Nice
    > Cable, and I did NOT use ordinary VGA connectors to do this...

    Have you described what you did in that case before?

    > Bob M.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:df7lln12t7f@news3.newsguy.com...
    > > For one data point - I have successfully run what were
    > > essentially "VGA" signals, at 1280 x 1024 pixels, over
    > > 100 METERS of cable - but it was Really Truly Very Nice
    > > Cable, and I did NOT use ordinary VGA connectors to do this...
    >
    > Have you described what you did in that case before?

    No, because I doubt that it would be of much use to the readers
    of this group; but just for the sake of satisfying curiousities, this
    was an experiment performed for a customer who (obviously)
    interested in doing some SERIOUS "remoting" of monitors, for
    reasons that are unimportant here. We managed to get a very
    usable image at the end of a 100 meter length of cable, but
    the cable in question was some very, VERY nice low-loss
    coax that had been special-ordered from Belden. It's not
    something that most people would be able to do, of course, but
    I offer it as an example that simple length alone is not THAT
    big a deal - it's a matter of cable quality, losses, the ambient
    environment, etc..

    Bob M.
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