what should the AGP bus speed be

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

What should the AGP bus speed be with a GeForce FX 5700 Ultra. I also
have 2800+ and a DFI NF11 Ultra AL mobo it's at 66mhz right now and i
dont know if it is supposed to be higher.
13 answers Last reply
More about what speed
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    It's been 66Mhz a long time for all video cards. 66mhz is the right setting
    for your card.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "PRIVATE1964" <private1964@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20040402191331.29433.00000632@mb-m11.aol.com...
    > It's been 66Mhz a long time for all video cards. 66mhz is the right
    setting
    > for your card.

    what happens if you raise it?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Alan wrote:
    > "PRIVATE1964" <private1964@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:20040402191331.29433.00000632@mb-m11.aol.com...
    >
    >> It's been 66Mhz a long time for all video cards. 66mhz is the right
    >
    > setting
    >
    >>for your card.
    >
    >
    > what happens if you raise it?
    >
    >
    that's what i was going to ask. i mean how much faster is stable. and
    should i raise it.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >that's what i was going to ask. i mean how much faster is stable. and
    >should i raise it.

    You could raise it, but that would be overclocking the AGP bus.
    Newer Nvidia cards such as the original Geforce and up seem to be able to
    handle a high AGP bus up to 99 Mhz. From things I have read ATI cards seem to
    have trouble with anything higher then 66.
    The gain in performance is not that much even if you set it to 99Mhz. This
    depends a lot on if your card is 2X, 4X or 8X.
    Someone using just a 2X card would probably see more gain then someone using an
    8X card, but even then it's not very much.
    You might gain a couple hundred extra marks in 3Dmark2001 at a setting of 99
    Mhz.
    There is always a risk though running over 66Mhz, because your running it ot of
    spec. You could ruin the video card.
    If your like me I try to squeeze every last bit of performance out of my system
    within reason.
    I run the AGP bus at 76. It gives me probably 50 extra points in 3Dmark and
    most likely it is not high enough to damage my video card.
    It all comes down how much risk your willing to take for a little bit of extra
    performance.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Keep in mind, your AGP bus runs in correlation to your PCI bus.


    If you have a nice sound card such as any of the Turtle Beach or
    Creative models, you'll be overclocking their bus too.


    You run more risk in damaging your PCI cards than your AGP cards.


    Besides, I've never noticed a performance increase in running my AGP
    bus out of spec, and I'm able to get it up to the 100's.


    It won't provide any benefits, because your graphics card doesn't even
    consistently use the full potential bandwidth of an AGP 4x slot... and
    a lot of us are running AGP 8x now without any performance increases.


    PRIVATE1964 wrote:

    > > that's what i was going to ask. i mean how much faster is stable.
    > > and should i raise it.
    >
    > You could raise it, but that would be overclocking the AGP bus.
    > Newer Nvidia cards such as the original Geforce and up seem to be
    > able to handle a high AGP bus up to 99 Mhz. From things I have read
    > ATI cards seem to have trouble with anything higher then 66.
    > The gain in performance is not that much even if you set it to 99Mhz.
    > This depends a lot on if your card is 2X, 4X or 8X.
    > Someone using just a 2X card would probably see more gain then
    > someone using an 8X card, but even then it's not very much.
    > You might gain a couple hundred extra marks in 3Dmark2001 at a
    > setting of 99 Mhz.
    > There is always a risk though running over 66Mhz, because your
    > running it ot of spec. You could ruin the video card.
    > If your like me I try to squeeze every last bit of performance out of
    > my system within reason.
    > I run the AGP bus at 76. It gives me probably 50 extra points in
    > 3Dmark and most likely it is not high enough to damage my video card.
    > It all comes down how much risk your willing to take for a little bit
    > of extra performance.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >Keep in mind, your AGP bus runs in correlation to your PCI bus.
    >
    >
    >If you have a nice sound card such as any of the Turtle Beach or
    >Creative models, you'll be overclocking their bus too.

    That is not true. The AGP bus speed is set independent from the PCI bus. You
    can overclock the AGP bus and it will not effect the PCI bus.
    As far back as the BH6 there is a setting in the bios for setting the speed of
    the AGP bus, it does not effect the PCI bus which has it's own setting. The
    speed of the AGP bus is taken from the speed of the PCI bus in that case such
    as 2/3 or 1/1 ratio of the PCI bus. That does not speed up the PCI bus.


    >Besides, I've never noticed a performance increase in running my AGP
    >bus out of spec, and I'm able to get it up to the 100's.

    That's not true also, there is some improvement....but exactly like I posted.

    >consistently use the full potential bandwidth of an AGP 4x slot... and
    >a lot of us are running AGP 8x now without any performance increases.

    I also posted the amount gained depends on what the card is such as 2x, 4x or
    8x.
    I've measured a small gain increasing the AGP bus in benchmarks running at
    8X..so there is some gain.

    A+ Certification
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 06:44:03 +0000, PRIVATE1964 wrote:

    >>Keep in mind, your AGP bus runs in correlation to your PCI bus.

    Yepp.

    >>
    >>
    >
    > That is not true. The AGP bus speed is set independent from the PCI bus.

    BS. There's no such thing as AGP bus, AGP is part of the northbridge and
    is dependent of the PCI clock speed. Show me any mainboard where you can
    set the AGP clock without changing the PCI bus speed.

    >
    >>Besides, I've never noticed a performance increase in running my AGP bus
    >>out of spec, and I'm able to get it up to the 100's.

    Then your PCI bus is accelerated, too.
    Check it with WCPUID, you'll see.

    Greetz

    --


    Bora Ugurlu


    mailto:boraugurlu@yahoo.de
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Bora Ugurlu" <boraugurlu@yahoo.de> skrev i en meddelelse
    news:pan.2004.04.04.09.03.22.610000@yahoo.de...
    > On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 06:44:03 +0000, PRIVATE1964 wrote:
    > Then your PCI bus is accelerated, too.
    > Check it with WCPUID, you'll see.

    Where?
    G.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >BS. There's no such thing as AGP bus, AGP is part of the northbridge and
    >is dependent of the PCI clock speed. Show me any mainboard where you can
    >set the AGP clock without changing the PCI bus speed.

    You should check your facts better because your just plain wrong. I already
    mentioned the BH6. There is one clock signal that both bus peeds are derived
    from.
    In the case of the BH6 it would be the fsb. You set the fsb and it sets the
    proper divider for the PCI. You also have the option to change the AGP bus
    speed such as 2/3 , 1/1 which depends on what the fsb is running at. It does
    not change the PCI speed changing the AGP bus speed.

    http://www.thetechzone.com/articles/overclocking/bios/page2.shtml

    Do you see this? AGPCLK/CPUCLK

    That changes the AGP bus speed.

    How's about this setting? Ext. Clock (PCI)

    That changes the fsb which effects the PCI speed on the BH6.

    With Nforce2 boards you can now even change the fsb without even effecting the
    PCI speed.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    You guys are entirely confused.

    You aren't even reading what each other is saying.


    The BH6 is one exception, but I've never seen anyone use that board for
    AGP or PCI overclocking independent from CPU ocing.


    However, the BH6 aside, other motherboards either allow you to adjust
    either a divider or a frequency for the AGP AND PCI clocks together,
    not independently.


    Newer motherboards allow you to adjust the frequency directly in 1mhz
    increments, BUT neither the AGP nor PCI frequency can be adjusted
    independently. This allows you to manually lock the AGP and PCI clocks
    at default, or leave it on automatic to increase with the FSB.


    I have a Gigabyte Sinxp1384 SIS655 chipset, which allows you to
    manually set the AGP and PCI clocks independent from the FSB.

    It has 9 different memory dividers instead of 5 or 6.

    When I adjust my AGP frequency, every 2mhz, the PCI frequency raises
    1mhz, but I still can't adjust them independently.


    The Nforce and the BH6 don't have those features.


    As mentioned on http://www.crazypc.com/articles/overclocking.htm

    the BH6 II is the only motherboard that has an independent PCI
    MULTIPLIERS, but not FREQUENCY adjustment.


    Here is a test using a Radeon, that shows raising the AGP clock speed
    that presents a negligible difference, and in some cases, lowers the
    FPS:
    http://www.sysopt.com/articles/AGPoverclock/


    Here is another one that shows a 7mhz increase from default (66/33) to
    94/47:

    http://forums.anandtech.com/messageview.cfm?threadid=959536&catid=28


    I don't think the performance increase is that great... considering in
    that test his FPS stays marginally the same every 4Mhz on the AGP clock
    and every 2Mhz on the PCI clock. Not to mention, an additional 2Mhz
    past 94/47 crashed his system.


    It's pretty simple to see that AGP/PCI overclocking does nothing
    significant.


    Not only does it deter you from overclocking your GPU and video card's
    ram, but there are stability issues... and you run the risk of burning
    out your southbridge.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 13:07:45 +0200, Clock?n Roll wrote:

    >
    > Where?

    http://cgi2.tky.3web.ne.jp/~nrklv/cgi-bin/softdl.cgi?wcpu330.exe

    --


    Bora Ugurlu


    mailto:boraugurlu@yahoo.de
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 06:16:32 +0000, teqguy wrote:

    >
    > To lock it, yes, but to overclock the AGP clock, no. And again, there is
    > no such thing as an AGP bus.

    that's what I was actually trying to say, ty.

    >
    > If there was an AGP bus, it would do all pooling, take load off of the
    > Northbridge, and generate it's own clock.
    >
    > But there is no such thing as a hardware AGP bus.


    ditto.

    --


    Bora Ugurlu


    mailto:boraugurlu@yahoo.de
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >> But there is no such thing as a hardware AGP bus.

    How do you think the graphic card transfers textures into system memory if it
    uses the AGP aperture size in system memory? Across air?
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