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6800 held back for tech reasons?

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Anonymous
June 22, 2004 4:13:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

I just saw on the repeat of last night's episode of The Screensavers that
Intel has their new PCI Express boards ready to go. Maybe the 6800's are
being held back so that they can be designed for PCI Express before release.
It's just a thought. :-)
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 8:06:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Mr. Brian Allen wrote:
> I just saw on the repeat of last night's episode of The Screensavers that
> Intel has their new PCI Express boards ready to go. Maybe the 6800's are
> being held back so that they can be designed for PCI Express before release.
> It's just a thought. :-)
>
>

The HSI chip is ready and good-to-go. The major problem has been chip
yields for the 6800U core. NVidia hasn't been getting the output they
want and having a lot of process errors during manufacure.

Normally this might not be such a problem for a big chip maker, but with
TSMC still bearing the brunt of fabrication, and combined with a large
die and complicated .11/.13 process -- yields are too low. Leading to
delays. Less chips fit on a wafer and thus bad batches are more costly.
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 2:28:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:06:59 -0500, deimos <deimos@localhost.net>
wrote:


>The HSI chip is ready and good-to-go. The major problem has been chip
>yields for the 6800U core. NVidia hasn't been getting the output they
>want and having a lot of process errors during manufacure.
>
>Normally this might not be such a problem for a big chip maker, but with
>TSMC still bearing the brunt of fabrication, and combined with a large
>die and complicated .11/.13 process -- yields are too low. Leading to
>delays. Less chips fit on a wafer and thus bad batches are more costly.

ATI wins this round again based on sheer design elegance alone.
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Anonymous
June 23, 2004 12:41:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>The HSI chip is ready and good-to-go. The major problem has been chip
>yields for the 6800U core. NVidia hasn't been getting the output they
>want and having a lot of process errors during manufacure.
>
>Normally this might not be such a problem for a big chip maker, but with
>TSMC still bearing the brunt of fabrication, and combined with a large
>die and complicated .11/.13 process -- yields are too low. Leading to
>delays. Less chips fit on a wafer and thus bad batches are more costly.

TSMC is making ATI's chips aw well, right? ATI isn't having major
problems... maybe they're hogging all the fabs
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 7:11:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

> TSMC is making ATI's chips aw well, right? ATI isn't having major
> problems... maybe they're hogging all the fabs

ATI isn't having problems? HAve you tried to get
a x800xt? They're as hard to find as 6800u.

Jeff B
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 9:52:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:06:59 -0500, deimos <deimos@localhost.net>
wrote:

>Mr. Brian Allen wrote:
>> I just saw on the repeat of last night's episode of The Screensavers that
>> Intel has their new PCI Express boards ready to go. Maybe the 6800's are
>> being held back so that they can be designed for PCI Express before release.
>> It's just a thought. :-)
>>
>>
>
>The HSI chip is ready and good-to-go. The major problem has been chip
>yields for the 6800U core. NVidia hasn't been getting the output they
>want and having a lot of process errors during manufacure.
>
>Normally this might not be such a problem for a big chip maker, but with
>TSMC still bearing the brunt of fabrication, and combined with a large
>die and complicated .11/.13 process -- yields are too low. Leading to
>delays. Less chips fit on a wafer and thus bad batches are more costly.


IBM makes the NV40 (6800 family ) , not TSMC.

Always likely to have very poor yield with this size of non-memory
chip (210m transistors on 130nm ). Ati's X800 ( 160m transistors on
130nm ) has only been trickling too. Prices will stay high until both
chips are revamped on 110nm or smaller. I believe that such
revamping is currently underway at top priority at both chip-design
houses.

You know why the 6800 is numbered thus ?

Well, remember that the FX5800 was replaced by the cooler,
better FX5900 ? Look for the nVidia 6900 in due course,
maybe by Christmas. Faster, cooler, but unlike the FX5900,
little architectural change in the upgrade.

John Lewis
!