power on failure

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.

When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
the USB ports, for these tests.

Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
12 answers Last reply
More about power failure
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Try reseating everything - memory, cards, CPU, etc.


    Al wrote:
    > Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    >
    > When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    > power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    > and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
    > behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
    > the USB ports, for these tests.
    >
    > Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    > result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Could also be a failed capacitor on the motherboard. MSI Pentium III boards
    were among those manufactured with substandard capacitors... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 06:58:37 -0500, "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.net> wrote:

    >Try reseating everything - memory, cards, CPU, etc.
    >
    >
    >Al wrote:
    >> Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    >>
    >> When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    >> power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    >> and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
    >> behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
    >> the USB ports, for these tests.
    >>
    >> Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    >> result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Somone else mentioned a failed capacitor and this is the usual cause.
    Look for a capacitor(s) with a buldged out top, usually with a dark
    stain on top as well. I have seen several of these. Usually on the
    large capacitors near the processor.

    Despite the fact that these boards are multi laryered it is not too
    hard to change these out . Requires someone with advanced, but not
    genius ability. My friend did his, and he hasn't soldered in years.

    I had a recent failure on my sister's computer with identical problem
    as yours, only fan would turn much less, before stopping.

    It was under waranty & I sent it away. There was no report of nature
    of repair, only that the bios was flashed to newest version.
    This suggests that the bios chip was changed. There was no phyisical
    evidence of repair on the boord and there was no sign of capacitor
    damage before repair.
    This was on an early Asus P4 board.
    A replacement bd was only about $75 CAN wholesale, but I see similar
    prices at Newegg etc.

    Good luck


    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 04:51:33 GMT, Al <none@no.com> wrote:

    >Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    >
    >When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    >power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    >and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
    >behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
    >the USB ports, for these tests.
    >
    >Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    >result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    The same MSI boards are readily available on eBay as surplus new (or unused,
    depending on how you look at these things) for less than $50. Given the choice
    between buying a replacement or de-soldering blown caps and re-soldering caps of
    exactly the same specifications, I think I would opt for buying a replacement.
    Getting the same caps is a challenge outweighed only by the difficulty of
    de-soldering, re-soldering, and extensive post-operative testing. But then, I
    am not known for my adeptness with a soldering iron, and I am known for finding
    the quickest path to a problem resolution... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:09:10 GMT, gg <noway@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Somone else mentioned a failed capacitor and this is the usual cause.
    >Look for a capacitor(s) with a buldged out top, usually with a dark
    >stain on top as well. I have seen several of these. Usually on the
    >large capacitors near the processor.
    >
    >Despite the fact that these boards are multi laryered it is not too
    >hard to change these out . Requires someone with advanced, but not
    >genius ability. My friend did his, and he hasn't soldered in years.
    >
    >I had a recent failure on my sister's computer with identical problem
    >as yours, only fan would turn much less, before stopping.
    >
    >It was under waranty & I sent it away. There was no report of nature
    >of repair, only that the bios was flashed to newest version.
    >This suggests that the bios chip was changed. There was no phyisical
    >evidence of repair on the boord and there was no sign of capacitor
    >damage before repair.
    >This was on an early Asus P4 board.
    >A replacement bd was only about $75 CAN wholesale, but I see similar
    >prices at Newegg etc.
    >
    >Good luck
    >
    >
    >On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 04:51:33 GMT, Al <none@no.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    >>
    >>When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    >>power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    >>and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
    >>behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
    >>the USB ports, for these tests.
    >>
    >>Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    >>result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Listen to Ed and Ben, they're always right. (sorry guys, take it when it's
    offered!)
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:41f2af05.17862120@nntp.charter.net...
    > The same MSI boards are readily available on eBay as surplus new (or
    unused,
    > depending on how you look at these things) for less than $50. Given the
    choice
    > between buying a replacement or de-soldering blown caps and re-soldering
    caps of
    > exactly the same specifications, I think I would opt for buying a
    replacement.
    > Getting the same caps is a challenge outweighed only by the difficulty of
    > de-soldering, re-soldering, and extensive post-operative testing. But
    then, I
    > am not known for my adeptness with a soldering iron, and I am known for
    finding
    > the quickest path to a problem resolution... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:09:10 GMT, gg <noway@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Somone else mentioned a failed capacitor and this is the usual cause.
    > >Look for a capacitor(s) with a buldged out top, usually with a dark
    > >stain on top as well. I have seen several of these. Usually on the
    > >large capacitors near the processor.
    > >
    > >Despite the fact that these boards are multi laryered it is not too
    > >hard to change these out . Requires someone with advanced, but not
    > >genius ability. My friend did his, and he hasn't soldered in years.
    > >
    > >I had a recent failure on my sister's computer with identical problem
    > >as yours, only fan would turn much less, before stopping.
    > >
    > >It was under waranty & I sent it away. There was no report of nature
    > >of repair, only that the bios was flashed to newest version.
    > >This suggests that the bios chip was changed. There was no phyisical
    > >evidence of repair on the boord and there was no sign of capacitor
    > >damage before repair.
    > >This was on an early Asus P4 board.
    > >A replacement bd was only about $75 CAN wholesale, but I see similar
    > >prices at Newegg etc.
    > >
    > >Good luck
    > >
    > >
    > >On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 04:51:33 GMT, Al <none@no.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >>Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    > >>
    > >>When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    > >>power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    > >>and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the
    computer
    > >>behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged
    into
    > >>the USB ports, for these tests.
    > >>
    > >>Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    > >>result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.
    > >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Unfortunately, the boards have the same faulty capacitors as the
    originals do, so if they're old-stock, or used, they're likely to fail
    in the same way, and given the age and deterioration of the electrolyte
    in the caps over time (or use), probably sooner than the original.

    There are people who will replace the caps for the same $50 or so with a
    guarantee (http://www.motherboardrepair.com) - given that except for the
    faulty caps, the boards are fine, I'd take that route before replacing
    with another board containing faulty caps.

    If you're willing to do some case modification, there are some
    manufacturers whose boards were not affected by the cap issues - ASUS,
    among them.


    Ben Myers wrote:
    > The same MSI boards are readily available on eBay as surplus new (or unused,
    > depending on how you look at these things) for less than $50. Given the choice
    > between buying a replacement or de-soldering blown caps and re-soldering caps of
    > exactly the same specifications, I think I would opt for buying a replacement.
    > Getting the same caps is a challenge outweighed only by the difficulty of
    > de-soldering, re-soldering, and extensive post-operative testing. But then, I
    > am not known for my adeptness with a soldering iron, and I am known for finding
    > the quickest path to a problem resolution... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:09:10 GMT, gg <noway@hotmail.com> wrote:
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    You're right about the faulty caps on any of the MSI boards. On balance, I
    think that the best solution is another brand of replacement motherboard.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 22:18:33 -0500, "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.net> wrote:

    >Unfortunately, the boards have the same faulty capacitors as the
    >originals do, so if they're old-stock, or used, they're likely to fail
    >in the same way, and given the age and deterioration of the electrolyte
    >in the caps over time (or use), probably sooner than the original.
    >
    >There are people who will replace the caps for the same $50 or so with a
    >guarantee (http://www.motherboardrepair.com) - given that except for the
    >faulty caps, the boards are fine, I'd take that route before replacing
    >with another board containing faulty caps.
    >
    >If you're willing to do some case modification, there are some
    >manufacturers whose boards were not affected by the cap issues - ASUS,
    >among them.
    >
    >
    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> The same MSI boards are readily available on eBay as surplus new (or unused,
    >> depending on how you look at these things) for less than $50. Given the choice
    >> between buying a replacement or de-soldering blown caps and re-soldering caps of
    >> exactly the same specifications, I think I would opt for buying a replacement.
    >> Getting the same caps is a challenge outweighed only by the difficulty of
    >> de-soldering, re-soldering, and extensive post-operative testing. But then, I
    >> am not known for my adeptness with a soldering iron, and I am known for finding
    >> the quickest path to a problem resolution... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:09:10 GMT, gg <noway@hotmail.com> wrote:
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Al wrote:

    > Gateway Essential 950c, FlexATX MB and SFX PSU. No added cards.
    >
    > When I press the power switch, it will only come on momentarily - the
    > power indicator light is yellow and the PS fan spins a couple of times,
    > and that's it. I tried another working ATX power supply, and the computer
    > behaves exactly the same. No printer, mouse, keyboard etc is plugged into
    > the USB ports, for these tests.
    >
    > Is there some common cause, beside the power supply, that is known to
    > result in this failure in Gateways? Thanks.

    An improper ground from a misaligned mounting screw or contact with the
    case could cause similar behavior.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 22:18:33 -0500, "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.net>
    wrote:

    yes, it did turn out to be bad Taiwanese caps, as in http://badcaps.net, so
    it's been an education.

    >There are people who will replace the caps for the same $50 or so with a
    >guarantee (http://www.motherboardrepair.com) - given that except for the
    >faulty caps, the boards are fine,

    yes, that is, if the bad caps didn't result in damage to other components. And
    there's the rub: I can't find suitable caps locally (i.e., low ESR, 105
    Celsius, and at or somewhat above capacitance value). Ordering online means
    you're generally paying big shipping costs, which kill you on a small
    purchase.

    5 were bulged, and I wanted to replace those to see if I could start, then
    replace all others >1000uF if I could startup. I've already removed the bad
    caps.

    So now I have to decide whether to spend maybe $30+ on caps, which might not
    result in a running computer - or else try find a new flex board for this
    machine with a cpu/ram upgrade (please see new thread).

    >I'd take that route before replacing
    >with another board containing faulty caps.

    thanks to all for the replies.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    The combination of $30 for replacement caps and the time and effort to unsolder
    the bad ones and solder in the new ones would quickly get me thinking of other
    possibilities. You have no guarantee that the board will work properly. Some
    other components could have been taken out when the caps began to bulge.

    The flex ATX form factor offers limited choices for upgrades. I've seen an Asus
    Pentium 4 flex ATX board, and Asus stuff is pretty good.

    Measure the dimensions inside the computer case to see whether a microATX board
    will fit. MicroATX is a little larger and typically offers more expansion
    (slots, memory, IDE connectors) than flex. IBM's flex ATX cases fall just short
    of the dimensions needed to take a microATX board, but maybe Gateway's flex case
    is a little bigger? ... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 18:10:47 GMT, none@no.com (Al) wrote:

    >On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 22:18:33 -0500, "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >yes, it did turn out to be bad Taiwanese caps, as in http://badcaps.net, so
    >it's been an education.
    >
    >>There are people who will replace the caps for the same $50 or so with a
    >>guarantee (http://www.motherboardrepair.com) - given that except for the
    >>faulty caps, the boards are fine,
    >
    >yes, that is, if the bad caps didn't result in damage to other components. And
    >there's the rub: I can't find suitable caps locally (i.e., low ESR, 105
    >Celsius, and at or somewhat above capacitance value). Ordering online means
    >you're generally paying big shipping costs, which kill you on a small
    >purchase.
    >
    >5 were bulged, and I wanted to replace those to see if I could start, then
    >replace all others >1000uF if I could startup. I've already removed the bad
    >caps.
    >
    >So now I have to decide whether to spend maybe $30+ on caps, which might not
    >result in a running computer - or else try find a new flex board for this
    >machine with a cpu/ram upgrade (please see new thread).
    >
    >>I'd take that route before replacing
    >>with another board containing faulty caps.
    >
    >thanks to all for the replies.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 19:01:59 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >Measure the dimensions inside the computer case to see whether a microATX board
    >will fit. MicroATX is a little larger and typically offers more expansion
    >(slots, memory, IDE connectors) than flex. IBM's flex ATX cases fall just short
    >of the dimensions needed to take a microATX board, but maybe Gateway's flex case
    >is a little bigger?

    Thanks, Ben. The available space inside the case measures 7 3/4" by 9" (The
    9" is along the back side, the 7 3/4" is front-to-back.)

    This is a kind of flip-top model, where the brackets for the drives hinge up
    out of the way for access to the MB. When flipped down, the drive brackets
    latch down onto a standing piece of case metal. That piece of standing metal
    is what limits the size of any MB to be put in there. But, I could conceivably
    undercut some of that metal away and still leave the latching function - and
    accomodate maybe an inch or so more, to 9x9"

    Seen sidewise, from the PSU side, something like this:


    Xooooooooooooooooo
    Xooooooooooooooooo <---- drive brackets flipped down
    X
    X XXXXX
    X X <---- the standing metal
    X X
    X X ================================== <---- MB (x-section)
    X X
    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX <---- 'floor' of the case


    However, when flipped down, the drive brackets also limit the height of any MB
    that might go in there.

    I've just read that the mounting holes shoud be the same for micro and flex,
    so that woud be break if it turns out to be true.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Yes, the mounting holes are the same for flex and micro ATX boards. There are
    some smallish microATX boards which may fit.

    Intel made a D810EMO flexATX board, Socket 370, but extremely limited with only
    a single DIMM socket and no slots. That one may work for you... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 20:58:56 GMT, none@no.com (Al) wrote:

    >On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 19:01:59 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    >Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Measure the dimensions inside the computer case to see whether a microATX board
    >>will fit. MicroATX is a little larger and typically offers more expansion
    >>(slots, memory, IDE connectors) than flex. IBM's flex ATX cases fall just short
    >>of the dimensions needed to take a microATX board, but maybe Gateway's flex case
    >>is a little bigger?
    >
    >Thanks, Ben. The available space inside the case measures 7 3/4" by 9" (The
    >9" is along the back side, the 7 3/4" is front-to-back.)
    >
    >This is a kind of flip-top model, where the brackets for the drives hinge up
    >out of the way for access to the MB. When flipped down, the drive brackets
    >latch down onto a standing piece of case metal. That piece of standing metal
    >is what limits the size of any MB to be put in there. But, I could conceivably
    >undercut some of that metal away and still leave the latching function - and
    >accomodate maybe an inch or so more, to 9x9"
    >
    >Seen sidewise, from the PSU side, something like this:
    >
    >
    >Xooooooooooooooooo
    >Xooooooooooooooooo <---- drive brackets flipped down
    >X
    >X XXXXX
    >X X <---- the standing metal
    >X X
    >X X ================================== <---- MB (x-section)
    >X X
    >XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX <---- 'floor' of the case
    >
    >
    >However, when flipped down, the drive brackets also limit the height of any MB
    >that might go in there.
    >
    >I've just read that the mounting holes shoud be the same for micro and flex,
    >so that woud be break if it turns out to be true.
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