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Geforce 6800 Temperature?

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Anonymous
August 18, 2004 10:15:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Hi!

I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.

Do you think this high temperature will break the card? The slowdown limit
is at 135 degrees on my card!

Regards
Kent
August 19, 2004 3:07:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Wed, 18 Aug 2004 18:15:53 +0000, Kent Nordström wrote:

> I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
> attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.

I would imagine having a 101C heating element inside your case would cause
other problems as well! The fan is there for a reason. That is to take
heat away from the heatsink so that the card doesn't melt. I would imagine
the pcb that it is soldered to may start to burn if you run it at those
temperatures for too long ;) 

--
Jafar Calley
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
d+ s-:+ a C++++ L++ E--- W++ N++ w-- PE- t* 5++ R+ !tv D+ G e* h---- x?
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------
Registered Linux User #359623
http://fatcatftp.homelinux.org
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 3:24:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

100C is the boiling point of water. Do you really want to run your card
hotter than that?

--
DaveW



"Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote in message
news:t1NUc.877$d5.6787@newsb.telia.net...
> Hi!
>
> I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
> attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.
>
> Do you think this high temperature will break the card? The slowdown limit
> is at 135 degrees on my card!
>
> Regards
> Kent
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 11:23:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Wed, 18 Aug 2004 18:15:53 GMT, "Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com>
wrote:

>Hi!
>
>I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
>attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.
>

Mean time to catastrophic failure of commercial silicon doubles for
every 10 degrees C rise in temp above 70 degrees C.

Plus design timing margins are normally set at 90 degrees C
for commercial silicon in design simulation. Silicon slows fast with
rising temperature. Expect graphics corruption.

Anyway your assessment of 101 degrees is ridiculous -- which
worst-case fully-silicon exercising benchmark were you running
when you measure the temp.

BTW, the core-temp limit built into the nVidia silicon and driver
of 135 or 140 degrees is intended to catch gross and catastrophic
ventilation failure. not long-term systematic overheating.

John Lewis


>Do you think this high temperature will break the card? The slowdown limit
>is at 135 degrees on my card!
>
>Regards
>Kent
>
>
August 19, 2004 3:10:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 07:23:22 +0000, John Lewis wrote:

> BTW, the core-temp limit built into the nVidia silicon and driver
> of 135 or 140 degrees is intended to catch gross and catastrophic
> ventilation failure. not long-term systematic overheating.

Depending on the type of solder, the melting point can be from 138C to
175C. I am talking liquid here, not just softened!
I imagine such high temperatures would run the risk of the GPU actually
falling off completely!
That would be worth a photo on priceless.com ;) 

--
Jafar Calley
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
d+ s-:+ a C++++ L++ E--- W++ N++ w-- PE- t* 5++ R+ !tv D+ G e* h---- x?
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------
Registered Linux User #359623
http://fatcatftp.homelinux.org
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 9:37:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Thanks very much for the responses!

If the card reaches the 135 degree peak limit, the Help states that Gpu will
slow down to avoid overheating! Thus degrees lower than 135 degrees are not
considered overheating the card. I also find this strange but looking at the
level-meter (in the Nvidia-properties) it only starts showing red when the
temperature is about 90 degrees. My common sense tells me to turn the
gpu-fan back on, but does not the level-meter show that it is ok? I think it
does...

/Kent

Btw No melt down pictures yet ;-)


"Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote in message
news:t1NUc.877$d5.6787@newsb.telia.net...
> Hi!
>
> I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
> attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.
>
> Do you think this high temperature will break the card? The slowdown limit
> is at 135 degrees on my card!
>
> Regards
> Kent
>
>
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 11:33:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

jafar wrote:

> On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 07:23:22 +0000, John Lewis wrote:
>
>> BTW, the core-temp limit built into the nVidia silicon and driver
>> of 135 or 140 degrees is intended to catch gross and catastrophic
>> ventilation failure. not long-term systematic overheating.
>
> Depending on the type of solder, the melting point can be from 138C to
> 175C. I am talking liquid here, not just softened!
> I imagine such high temperatures would run the risk of the GPU actually
> falling off completely!
> That would be worth a photo on priceless.com ;) 

So what silicon eutectic melts at 175C? You're assuming that the leads are
bonded to the chip using ordinary tin-lead solders or their lead-free
equivalents, when they're actually bonded using silicon-gold,
silicon-aluminum, or silicon-whatever else the wire is made of eutectics
that have a significantly higher melting point. Further, the chip is
usually epoxy-bonded to the substrate so it does't "fall off completely"
even if all the leads are detached.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
August 20, 2004 12:15:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 17:37:05 GMT, "Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com>
wrote:

>Thanks very much for the responses!
>
>If the card reaches the 135 degree peak limit, the Help states that Gpu will
>slow down to avoid overheating! Thus degrees lower than 135 degrees are not
>considered overheating the card.

Nonsense. I am an engineer involved in silicon design.
Commercial silicon is normally simulated at 90 degrees C,
20 degrees above the case temp maximum for commercial
silicon ( 70 degrees C)

You want my honest opinion about the non-adjustable 135 degree
limit in the NV35 driver ? Probably a silicon-design screw-up - it was
meant to be lower..... Limit seems to be around 90 degrees C
in the 6800 family, with (according to another thread in this
newsgroup) slowing of the internal clock-rate a la Intel's protection
mechanism on their CPUs.

Military silicon -- based on very conservative processes, 350 nm
or higher --- is only rated to 125 degrees C.

Run your 5900 without a fan ( or equivalently-efficient heat
removal ) at your peril; just make sure that you have money
for a replacement in the bank. The failure mode is normally
catastrophic and irreversible; frequently with no warning.

John Lewis

> I also find this strange but looking at the
>level-meter (in the Nvidia-properties) it only starts showing red when the
>temperature is about 90 degrees. My common sense tells me to turn the
>gpu-fan back on, but does not the level-meter show that it is ok? I think it
>does...
>
>/Kent
>
>Btw No melt down pictures yet ;-)
>
>
>"Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote in message
>news:t1NUc.877$d5.6787@newsb.telia.net...
>> Hi!
>>
>> I was wondering what temperature your gpu is running in? Mine is with fan
>> attached = 53 degrees C, and with the fan disconnected = 101 degrees C.
>>
>> Do you think this high temperature will break the card? The slowdown limit
>> is at 135 degrees on my card!
>>
>> Regards
>> Kent
>>
>>
>
>
August 20, 2004 8:46:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

"Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote in message
news:5z5Vc.935$d5.7391@newsb.telia.net...
> Thanks very much for the responses!
>
> If the card reaches the 135 degree peak limit, the Help states that Gpu
will
> slow down to avoid overheating! Thus degrees lower than 135 degrees are
not
> considered overheating the card. I also find this strange but looking at
the
> level-meter (in the Nvidia-properties) it only starts showing red when the
> temperature is about 90 degrees. My common sense tells me to turn the
> gpu-fan back on, but does not the level-meter show that it is ok? I think
it
> does...

Kent, why ask the question if you are just going to ignore everyone?

Everyone here is saying (and I agree) that 100c is too hot. What do you
want to hear?

(And apart from anything else you say " it only starts showing red when the
temperature is about 90 degrees". What does RED tell you? Fine and dandy?
No problem, no worries"??? Red tells me danger!)

Chip
Anonymous
August 20, 2004 11:37:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

What I was trying to find out in the original post was how hot your similar
graphics cards was running!

I think that it is interesting that I was able to run the card for several
hours playing Doom3 and Far Cry without any glitch watsoever with a
temperature over 100 degrees C.

I also find it interesting that the nvidia control panel displays a degree
of 90 as being ok!

I got alot of interesting feedback, but I'm still waiting for any user who
actually has any practical overheating experience with the 6800.

I don't mean to offend anyone, the knowledge in this group is tremendous!
Got some very interesting feedback from John Lewis for example, thanks very
much I now know a bit more! :) 

/Kent

Btw As I dont want to risk my harddrives in the process I now have attached
the gpu-fan again :) 

"Chip" <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote in message
news:2omkkpFbmultU1@uni-berlin.de...
> "Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote in message
> news:5z5Vc.935$d5.7391@newsb.telia.net...
> > Thanks very much for the responses!
> >
> > If the card reaches the 135 degree peak limit, the Help states that Gpu
> will
> > slow down to avoid overheating! Thus degrees lower than 135 degrees are
> not
> > considered overheating the card. I also find this strange but looking at
> the
> > level-meter (in the Nvidia-properties) it only starts showing red when
the
> > temperature is about 90 degrees. My common sense tells me to turn the
> > gpu-fan back on, but does not the level-meter show that it is ok? I
think
> it
> > does...
>
> Kent, why ask the question if you are just going to ignore everyone?
>
> Everyone here is saying (and I agree) that 100c is too hot. What do you
> want to hear?
>
> (And apart from anything else you say " it only starts showing red when
the
> temperature is about 90 degrees". What does RED tell you? Fine and
dandy?
> No problem, no worries"??? Red tells me danger!)
>
> Chip
>
>
August 23, 2004 5:56:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

"Kent Nordström" <kent74@telia.com> wrote:
> What I was trying to find out in the original post was how hot your similar
> graphics cards was running!
>
> I think that it is interesting that I was able to run the card for several
> hours playing Doom3 and Far Cry without any glitch watsoever with a
> temperature over 100 degrees C.
>
> I also find it interesting that the nvidia control panel displays a degree
> of 90 as being ok!
>
> I got alot of interesting feedback, but I'm still waiting for any user who
> actually has any practical overheating experience with the 6800.
>
> I don't mean to offend anyone, the knowledge in this group is tremendous!
> Got some very interesting feedback from John Lewis for example, thanks very
> much I now know a bit more! :) 
>
> /Kent

John knows his Steam pipes from Gabe Newell's McDonald's mayonnaise
tubes, but most of us are still somewhat dim lightbulbs when it comes
to practical knowledge of the behaviour of graphics cards.
!