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Toshiba Reveals 2.5" HDD with 1 TB Capacity

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August 3, 2011 3:19:15 AM

Toshiba HDD are awesome. I had a 80GB for 6 years from my laptop. Still going strong as a backup drive for my desktop.

These will no doubt be reliable too.
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August 3, 2011 3:33:43 AM

Assume 1288.6 Mbps is refering to megabits per second. Haven't seen the "M" capitalized for megabits before and I haven't seen that metric used for hard drive transfer rates either although it does sound faster. In another words 161 MBps or if we are really trying to make it seem super fast 1,288,600,000 bps. Sorry that struck me odd.
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August 3, 2011 3:37:33 AM

Umm 5400RPM isn't gonna cut it in enterprise or home environments. It'll be ok for some ultra low power scenario, but otherwise we want 7200, 10K and 15K speeds.
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August 3, 2011 3:39:51 AM

JamesSneedAssume 1288.6 Mbps is refering to megabits per second. Haven't seen the "M" capitalized for megabits before and I haven't seen that metric used for hard drive transfer rates either although it does sound faster. In another words 161 MBps or if we are really trying to make it seem super fast 1,288,600,000 bps. Sorry that struck me odd.


What matters is if the 'b' is'B' or 'b'. The 'm' doesn't matter I don't think.

PS: Now that Toshiba is up to 500GB/platter in the 2.5" segment, this means that it is ready for 250GB/platter in the 1.8" segment right? 500GB 1.8" drives here we go.
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5
August 3, 2011 3:49:08 AM

WhySoBluePandaBear reveals he does not care.
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August 3, 2011 3:51:48 AM

And don't forget the improved read/write speeds that come with the increased data density. That's always a nice plus.
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August 3, 2011 3:55:23 AM

JamesSneedAssume 1288.6 Mbps is refering to megabits per second. Haven't seen the "M" capitalized for megabits before and I haven't seen that metric used for hard drive transfer rates either although it does sound faster. In another words 161 MBps or if we are really trying to make it seem super fast 1,288,600,000 bps. Sorry that struck me odd.


danwat1234What matters is if the 'b' is'B' or 'b'. The 'm' doesn't matter I don't think.PS: Now that Toshiba is up to 500GB/platter in the 2.5" segment, this means that it is ready for 250GB/platter in the 1.8" segment right? 500GB 1.8" drives here we go.


The "M" does matter because it refers to the prefix mega whereas "m" refers to the prefix milli. Of course it would be silly to measure storage in millibytes/millibits and most people will know what you mean even if you make that mistake but it is an important distinction.
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August 3, 2011 3:57:18 AM

Sorry, Toshiba (and Toms)...

But where was/is the news that Western Digital already beat Toshiba to the punch with a 1 TB 2.5" drive?

They have a Scorpio Blue 1 TB drive, and it's already out for purchase, while this one is still gearing up to get out there.

(But, I hear these drives have better speed than 500 GB 7200 RPM drives- so newsworthy anyways I suppose.)
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August 3, 2011 4:17:24 AM

JamesSneedAssume 1288.6 Mbps is refering to megabits per second. Haven't seen the "M" capitalized for megabits before and I haven't seen that metric used for hard drive transfer rates either although it does sound faster. In another words 161 MBps or if we are really trying to make it seem super fast 1,288,600,000 bps. Sorry that struck me odd.

It's a typo... which doesn't surprise me.

There's no way a 5400 RPM 2.5" drive has sequential transfer speeds similar to a 10000 RPM Veloci Raptor, even if the density has gone up significantly. I'm assuming he meant 128 MBps, and even then that's pretty damn impressive for a 5400 RPM 2.5" drive.


Actually it looks like the 1288.6Mbps figure is accurate. I confirmed this in the official press release. If it's true, then this drive is able to achieve sequential transfer speeds of 161 MBps, which is simply insane for this class of storage device. I'm speechless. I can't wait for this density to be applied to 7200 RPM 3.5" drives. Anyone else want a 4TB HD?
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August 3, 2011 4:18:15 AM

Western Digital and Samsung already have 1TB 2 platter 2.5" drives out, both spin at 5400RPM.
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August 3, 2011 6:22:16 AM

danwat1234Western Digital and Samsung already have 1TB 2 platter 2.5" drives out, both spin at 5400RPM.

But aren't those 12.5mm thick instead of the standard 9.5mm thick drives?
danwat1234What matters is if the 'b' is'B' or 'b'. The 'm' doesn't matter I don't think.PS: Now that Toshiba is up to 500GB/platter in the 2.5" segment, this means that it is ready for 250GB/platter in the 1.8" segment right? 500GB 1.8" drives here we go.

Yes yes please!
Devices such as the Sony NGP/PSP2 will need a 1.8" drive, if they intend for people to take digital distribution seriously.
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August 3, 2011 7:46:22 AM

palladin9479Umm 5400RPM isn't gonna cut it in enterprise or home environments. It'll be ok for some ultra low power scenario, but otherwise we want 7200, 10K and 15K speeds.


5400RPM may be not for enterprise application but perfectly fine for home.
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August 3, 2011 7:49:21 AM

As Travis said, previous 1 TB drives in the 2.5" form factor were 12.5 mm thick. That meant they couldn't fit in many (if not most) laptops.

At 9.5 mm thick, Toshiba's 1 TB drives will fit in any laptop supporting 2.5" hard drives.

As for the 5400 RPM, you wouldn't want that for your system drive if you could help it, but it's fine for a storage drive.
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August 3, 2011 8:19:14 AM

5400RPM is absolutely horrible for home use. Talk about taking ~forever~ to do anything. When my HDD at work started going south, it was replaced with a 320GB 5400RPM disk (was two 73GB 7200 disks in RAID). I needed more space and they figured it was a good time to swap it out since one of the previous disks was failing. Now when I come in for they day I put in my CAC click on outlook and go get coffee (remove CAC before I leave workstation). When I get back the HDD light is still going nuts and the system is sluggish as hell. 5~10 min later it's workable again. Opening applications and browsing the web can be slow. I'm currently trying to arrange for a new workstation since this one is getting out of lifecycle.

So no, a 5400RPM is not acceptable for home use, using it as a D: drive might work provided your not loading any applications off it. But then again what are you using it for? It's only saving grace is that their cool and use less power, good for laptops that don't have a SSD in them.
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August 3, 2011 11:14:46 AM

"So far info on pricing and actual availability is available, so stay tuned."

Wait... What?
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0
August 3, 2011 11:58:10 AM

palladin94795400RPM is absolutely horrible for home use. Talk about taking ~forever~ to do anything. When my HDD at work started going south, it was replaced with a 320GB 5400RPM disk (was two 73GB 7200 disks in RAID). I needed more space and they figured it was a good time to swap it out since one of the previous disks was failing. Now when I come in for they day I put in my CAC click on outlook and go get coffee (remove CAC before I leave workstation). When I get back the HDD light is still going nuts and the system is sluggish as hell. 5~10 min later it's workable again. Opening applications and browsing the web can be slow. I'm currently trying to arrange for a new workstation since this one is getting out of lifecycle.So no, a 5400RPM is not acceptable for home use, using it as a D: drive might work provided your not loading any applications off it. But then again what are you using it for? It's only saving grace is that their cool and use less power, good for laptops that don't have a SSD in them.


either this isn't recent drive or you got a "bad drive" in your work computer as i will say BS that "5400RPM is not acceptable for home use".

3 of 5 of my operational computers atm are 5400 RPM and not a single 1 takes 10+ mins to get to the point of being usable once the OS. longest is only 2-3 mins.

Shortest is about 15 seconds or less with a toshiba satellite a505 to use once you see the OS and that was bought about 18 months ago. (and it hasn't been reformatted once since it been bought)

Specs of this hdd:

4KB test:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ie-J5Y6gDN4/TjkxXYr3...

8MB test:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-pvD0qsW4Qs0/TjkxXaqT...


So you want to still tell me that 5400Rpm are not good for home use? If these are not good, then 7200Rpm HDD isn't going to be good either as the specs are not so much higher than what a 5400 rmp drive can make.


Just because 1 5400RPM drive giving/gave you a bad experience doesn't mean all 5400 RPM drives are not good.
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August 3, 2011 12:06:54 PM

oh btw, if you want to talk about drive not suitable for home usage in this moment in time. how about 6 to 7 year old, 30GB, 4200 RPM hdd. those puppies take FOREVER to load.
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August 3, 2011 3:00:14 PM

shoelessinsightAs Travis said, previous 1 TB drives in the 2.5" form factor were 12.5 mm thick. That meant they couldn't fit in many (if not most) laptops.At 9.5 mm thick, Toshiba's 1 TB drives will fit in any laptop supporting 2.5" hard drives.As for the 5400 RPM, you wouldn't want that for your system drive if you could help it, but it's fine for a storage drive.


Nope. Samsung was the first to the market with a 500GB/platter 2.5" Hard Drive with 9.5mm height. Then came Western Digital, and now Toshiba.

See here: http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/08/samsung-spinpoint-m8...

It's available on Amazon for $100 now.
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August 3, 2011 3:44:15 PM

palladin94795400RPM is absolutely horrible for home use. Talk about taking ~forever~ to do anything. When my HDD at work started going south, it was replaced with a 320GB 5400RPM disk (was two 73GB 7200 disks in RAID). I needed more space and they figured it was a good time to swap it out since one of the previous disks was failing. Now when I come in for they day I put in my CAC click on outlook and go get coffee (remove CAC before I leave workstation). When I get back the HDD light is still going nuts and the system is sluggish as hell. 5~10 min later it's workable again. Opening applications and browsing the web can be slow. I'm currently trying to arrange for a new workstation since this one is getting out of lifecycle.So no, a 5400RPM is not acceptable for home use, using it as a D: drive might work provided your not loading any applications off it. But then again what are you using it for? It's only saving grace is that their cool and use less power, good for laptops that don't have a SSD in them.


There are several other factors that you need to take into consideration when making a claim that the 5400rpm is "much" slower than a 7200rpm. These include:

-Cache size
-Disk size (3.5 versus 2.5)
-Array configuration (RAID, etc.)
-Platter number and density

If all of these factors are equal, then yes a 7200rpm drive will likely be faster than a 5400rpm drive.
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August 4, 2011 1:50:43 AM

singemagique said:
There are several other factors that you need to take into consideration when making a claim that the 5400rpm is "much" slower than a 7200rpm. These include:

-Cache size
-Disk size (3.5 versus 2.5)
-Array configuration (RAID, etc.)
-Platter number and density

If all of these factors are equal, then yes a 7200rpm drive will likely be faster than a 5400rpm drive.



Of course I'm assuming all other things being equal. This is purely about platter rotation speed and 5400RPM is just too slow for multitasking. Your running into the very real barrier of physics.
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