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What are the antialias and anisotropic settings

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 9, 2004 4:26:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

When playing games I usually have these set to zero / none. (Linux Unified
Driver). I then set up the game for all the best settings (eg 1280x1024,
highest texture etc). But should I be lowering these and increaseing these
nvidia settings? What is the optimum setting and how do they affect the
fps? While I'm at it, what is "sync to vblank" in the OpenGL settings?

I am using an AOpen Aeolus FX5900 with an AMD 3200 x86_64 (running in
32bit).

Is there a faq / website that explains these settings?

Thanks.
Anonymous
September 9, 2004 4:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

I'll try to make this as simple as possible.

Antialiasing (AA) & Anisotropic Filtering (AF) set to on should always give you
better graphics in a game. The higher you set them the better the game should
look, but it will also slow the game down more the higher you set them.

Antialiasing is filtering to get rid of the stair stepping in straight lines.
When your looking at a the egde of a wall in a game you will notice steps.
That's because the line is digital and because the resolution is not high
enough to make those steps small enough so they can't be noticed. You could
crank up the resolution in the games your playing. That would make the steps
smaller, but you would still notice them somewhat unless you were using a extra
super high resolution on a large monitor. So Antialiasing will smooth out those
steps even at lower resolutions like 640 x 480 or 800 x 600.

Anisotropic Filtering is for textures. The only way I can describe it is. If
your playing a game and you look at the ground you will notice the farther away
from you the ground is the blurrier it is also. They do that with the games to
have them run at reasonable speeds. So you can have Anisotropic Filtering in
side of the game and also on the video card in the hardware. So you could crank
it up in the game and also on the video card. Some games just use it on the
video card or can have their own Anisotropic Filtering. Anisotropic Filtering
helps a lot with flight sims. If your flying look at the ground without
Anisotropic Filtering you should see a glimmering effect with is not realistic.
Anisotropic Filtering will help get rid of that. You can also notice when
Anisotropic Filtering is on by looking at the ground in Half-life or Return to
Castle Wolfenstein. The ground will look in focus farther out when it is on. It
also helps with wall textures in the same way.


Some games might not work OK with Antialiasing or Anisotropic Filtering on.
Battlefield 1942 gets blurry text, but most will work fine and look much better
with them on.

I always try to use a little bit of both settings. Because each one helps in a
different way. If your running at a high resolution you might not need a high
setting for Antialiasing. There are no hard rues to follow. Just try setting
them as high as possible without causing your games to slow down too much.
Anonymous
September 9, 2004 4:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

anistropic helps keep surfaces you're looking at from an angle, sharp.

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September 10, 2004 2:45:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

> I'll try to make this as simple as possible.
>
[snip]

WOW thanks for that. I sort of understood the anti-aliasing concept previous
to my question but just wasn't too sure how it was applied in games.

I found tweaking these settings up slowed things right down. FPS on Red
Orchestra went to around 30ish at 1280x1024. Gonna experiment a bit and
see...

Thanks again.
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 2:47:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>WOW thanks for that. I sort of understood the anti-aliasing concept previous
>to my question but just wasn't too sure how it was applied in games.
>
>I found tweaking these settings up slowed things right down. FPS on Red
>Orchestra went to around 30ish at 1280x1024. Gonna experiment a bit and
>see...
>
>Thanks again.

Your welcome.

You should give atuner a try. It lets you set up each game with it's own AA and
AF settings. It will load in the settings and then start the game
automatically. I have tried the same feature with the newer Nvidia drivers, but
I went back to using atuner because it was easier to setup and to use.

I also recommend Reforce to set up your refresh rates for the different
resolutions you might use with games. It makes changes in the registry in
Windows XP so the refresh rates stay at what you want when you play games. If
you don't use it Windows XP will usually set everything to 60Hz. You could use
the Nvidia drivers, but it's easier with Reforce. You set up each resolution
with it's own refresh rate and apply it and that's it. It stays that way unless
you change video drivers or monitor.
September 10, 2004 4:06:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

>>WOW thanks for that. I sort of understood the anti-aliasing concept
>>previous to my question but just wasn't too sure how it was applied in
>>games.
>>
>>I found tweaking these settings up slowed things right down. FPS on Red
>>Orchestra went to around 30ish at 1280x1024. Gonna experiment a bit and
>>see...
>>
>>Thanks again.
>
> Your welcome.
>
>
> I also recommend Reforce to set up your refresh rates for the different
> resolutions you might use with games. It makes changes in the registry in
> Windows XP

Problem is, I use Linux ;) 
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 4:21:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>Problem is, I use Linux ;) 

Sorry I didn't remember seeing that in your original post.

The Nvidia drivers will do the same thing as atuner, but it's not as easy IMO.
!