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Custom resolution on a GF3 Ti200?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 12, 2004 7:39:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Does GF3 support custom resolution? Can you do it through nvidia's
control panel? thanks
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:58:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>Does GF3 support custom resolution? Can you do it through nvidia's
>control panel? thanks

I'm not sure what you mean by custom resolution.

You can only use resolutions that your monitor supports.
You can change the resolutions in the display panel, it will hide resolutions
your monitor can not do.

If you want to try messing with custom resolutions download this program called
RefeshForce

http://www.pagehosting.co.uk/rf/

It lets you input resolutions and the refresh rate. If your monitor doesn't
support the resolution it it won't work though.
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:58:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

>>Does GF3 support custom resolution? Can you do it through nvidia's
>>control panel? thanks
>
> I'm not sure what you mean by custom resolution.
>
> You can only use resolutions that your monitor supports.
> You can change the resolutions in the display panel, it will hide
> resolutions your monitor can not do.

Anyone who has had to deal with an HDTV will tell you that it may hide
resolutions that the monitor can't do but it doesn't do a very good job of
guessing what resolutions it _can_ do if they are something other than
SVGA, XGA, SXGA, etc.

> If you want to try messing with custom resolutions download this program
> called RefeshForce
>
> http://www.pagehosting.co.uk/rf/
>
> It lets you input resolutions and the refresh rate. If your monitor
> doesn't support the resolution it it won't work though.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Related resources
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 10:54:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>Anyone who has had to deal with an HDTV will tell you that it may hide
>resolutions that the monitor can't do but it doesn't do a very good job of
>guessing what resolutions it _can_ do if they are something other than
>SVGA, XGA, SXGA, etc.

Its not the drivers fault because it is only using what is in the inf file for
the monitor. It doesn't guess, if the wrong inf file was used for the monitor
it will display the wrong resolutions.
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 1:09:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

>>Anyone who has had to deal with an HDTV will tell you that it may hide
>>resolutions that the monitor can't do but it doesn't do a very good job of
>>guessing what resolutions it _can_ do if they are something other than
>>SVGA, XGA, SXGA, etc.
>
> Its not the drivers fault because it is only using what is in the inf file
> for the monitor. It doesn't guess, if the wrong inf file was used for the
> monitor it will display the wrong resolutions.

Earth to PRIVATE1964, we are not talking about a monitor here, we are
talking about a television. There IS no "inf file".

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 9:47:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>Earth to J. Clarke" jclarke@nospam.invalid

His original post made no mention of television so where are you getting this
from?

I don't ever recall anyone asking a specific question about resolution that was
not related to a monitor, unless they specified in the post it was about
something else such as a television.
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 3:09:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

>>Earth to J. Clarke" jclarke@nospam.invalid
>
> His original post made no mention of television so where are you getting
> this from?
>
> I don't ever recall anyone asking a specific question about resolution
> that was not related to a monitor, unless they specified in the post it
> was about something else such as a television.

Regardless, this reliance on "inf files" is silly. The effing monitor has
the ability to report its capabilities--if the driver can't read that
information and act accordingly it's broken.

And most monitors do not have "inf files" available. I've got an 8 thousand
dollar jobby sitting here with no "inf file".

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 10:10:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:cpj9dd0sgn@news2.newsguy.com...
> PRIVATE1964 wrote:
>
> >>Earth to J. Clarke" jclarke@nospam.invalid
> >
> > His original post made no mention of television so where are you getting
> > this from?
> >
> > I don't ever recall anyone asking a specific question about resolution
> > that was not related to a monitor, unless they specified in the post it
> > was about something else such as a television.
>
> Regardless, this reliance on "inf files" is silly. The effing monitor has
> the ability to report its capabilities--if the driver can't read that
> information and act accordingly it's broken.

Or the effing monitor is not exactly fully DDC-compliant, or the effing card
or the effing monitor is effed up, for eff's sake!

> And most monitors do not have "inf files" available.

Sure they do! And many are native to the OS. This ain't 1995 any more,
eff-it-all-to-a very hot place! Actually there are effing .inf files all
over the place if you want to effing hunt for the effing little buggers...
(oh, now I'm on this effing kick! Look out! Y'all are effed now!)

I've got an 8 thousand
> dollar jobby sitting here with no "inf file".

You could always make one if it were all that big an issue (not really in
most cases...)...not too tough...just parse your average monitor.inf file
with your monitor specs on hand, and it will all become clear as mud, I tell
ya...happy editing...done it for a few, including a couple unsupported
fixed-freq. jobbies...

Oh, lemme guess, it's a plasma screen...or is it a HDTV (which is how the
idea of television worked its way past the ol' channel marker buoy into the
typical open sea of Usenet chaos and OT diatribe)?

You know, I think *every* video card should come with the flexibility of
defining monitor specs like Matrox's Powerdesk. That's one bit of
flexibility I miss, out of not much else but the great 2d display. I guess
that's too much control to give your average end-user...


But to answer the original question: the monitor's EDID data should be
communicated to the card in most instances. Manually specifying refresh
rates, however, is not a bad thing by any means, as long as they're
supported by the monitor. No point in forcing unsupported resolutions,
really. All you'll give yourself is either a headache or eyestrain. Here is
an app to test if everything is happy in DDC-Land:

http://www.entechtaiwan.com/files/ddctest.exe which works with Win9x/ME, and
I haven't tried it in 2k or XP, but it's likely not to work...

and something a bit more in depth which is what you really want:

http://www.entechtaiwan.com/files/moninfo.exe which just plain works!

and these will tell you more about your monitor than you prolly wanted to
know in the first place...;-)

Oh, and RefreshForce is an expedient solution, and neatly answers the
original question. No need for any of this digression, really...


> --
> --John
> Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 2:05:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Nerdillius Maximus wrote:

>
> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
> news:cpj9dd0sgn@news2.newsguy.com...
>> PRIVATE1964 wrote:
>>
>> >>Earth to J. Clarke" jclarke@nospam.invalid
>> >
>> > His original post made no mention of television so where are you
>> > getting this from?
>> >
>> > I don't ever recall anyone asking a specific question about resolution
>> > that was not related to a monitor, unless they specified in the post it
>> > was about something else such as a television.
>>
>> Regardless, this reliance on "inf files" is silly. The effing monitor
>> has the ability to report its capabilities--if the driver can't read that
>> information and act accordingly it's broken.
>
> Or the effing monitor is not exactly fully DDC-compliant, or the effing
> card or the effing monitor is effed up, for eff's sake!

You begin to achieve enlightenment grasshopper.

>> And most monitors do not have "inf files" available.
>
> Sure they do! And many are native to the OS. This ain't 1995 any more,
> eff-it-all-to-a very hot place! Actually there are effing .inf files all
> over the place if you want to effing hunt for the effing little buggers...
> (oh, now I'm on this effing kick! Look out! Y'all are effed now!)

So where does one find these monitor specific "inf files" that are "native
to the OS"?

> I've got an 8 thousand
>> dollar jobby sitting here with no "inf file".
>
> You could always make one if it were all that big an issue (not really in
> most cases...)...not too tough...just parse your average monitor.inf file
> with your monitor specs on hand, and it will all become clear as mud, I
> tell ya...happy editing...done it for a few, including a couple
> unsupported fixed-freq. jobbies...
>
> Oh, lemme guess, it's a plasma screen...or is it a HDTV (which is how the
> idea of television worked its way past the ol' channel marker buoy into
> the typical open sea of Usenet chaos and OT diatribe)?

Nope.

> You know, I think *every* video card should come with the flexibility of
> defining monitor specs like Matrox's Powerdesk. That's one bit of
> flexibility I miss, out of not much else but the great 2d display. I guess
> that's too much control to give your average end-user...
>
>
> But to answer the original question: the monitor's EDID data should be
> communicated to the card in most instances.

Should. What should be and what is are seldom the same.

> Manually specifying refresh
> rates, however, is not a bad thing by any means, as long as they're
> supported by the monitor. No point in forcing unsupported resolutions,
> really. All you'll give yourself is either a headache or eyestrain. Here
> is an app to test if everything is happy in DDC-Land:
>
> http://www.entechtaiwan.com/files/ddctest.exe which works with Win9x/ME,
> and I haven't tried it in 2k or XP, but it's likely not to work...
>
> and something a bit more in depth which is what you really want:
>
> http://www.entechtaiwan.com/files/moninfo.exe which just plain works!
>
> and these will tell you more about your monitor than you prolly wanted to
> know in the first place...;-)
>
> Oh, and RefreshForce is an expedient solution, and neatly answers the
> original question. No need for any of this digression, really...

I find it interesting that you reference the entech site for a couple of
utilities but then recommend something other than Powerstrip for setting
resolutions and timings.

>
>> --
>> --John
>> Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
>> (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 4:58:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>
>Regardless, this reliance on "inf files" is silly. The effing monitor has
>the ability to report its capabilities--if the driver can't read that
>information and act accordingly it's broken.
>
>And most monitors do not have "inf files" available. I've got an 8 thousand
>dollar jobby sitting here with no "inf file".

What is silly is posting something the OP never even specified. Do you talk for
him at parties as well?

There is always an inf file involved either on a driver disk included with the
monitor or comes with the OS. If there wasn't there would sure be a lot of
monitors damaged from wrong signals applied.
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 4:58:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

>>
>>Regardless, this reliance on "inf files" is silly. The effing monitor has
>>the ability to report its capabilities--if the driver can't read that
>>information and act accordingly it's broken.
>>
>>And most monitors do not have "inf files" available. I've got an 8
>>thousand dollar jobby sitting here with no "inf file".
>
> What is silly is posting something the OP never even specified. Do you
> talk for him at parties as well?
>
> There is always an inf file involved either on a driver disk included with
> the monitor or comes with the OS.

Nope. There may be defaults but there is no "inf file" unless one is
specifically provided.

> If there wasn't there would sure be a
> lot of monitors damaged from wrong signals applied.

It's 2004. A monitor that receives a signal that it can't handle flashes
"signal out of range" and disconnects the video port.

But Windows does provide a set of "safe" defaults. OS defaults are not an
"inf file".

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:00:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

One other place I forgot to mention for inf files is in hardware inside the
monitor.

The fact remains who ever mentioned a television in this post? The OP surely
didn't.
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:00:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

PRIVATE1964 wrote:

> One other place I forgot to mention for inf files is in hardware inside
> the monitor.

There are no "inf files" "in hardware inside the monitor". An "inf file"
is, by definition, a file with the extension ".inf". The mechanism by
which a monitor reports its capabilities does not involve a file.

> The fact remains who ever mentioned a television in this post? The OP
> surely didn't.

I was using it as an example of a situation in which the mechanisms you
believe to be reliable fail.

And I am running my $8K monitor in a mode that requires the use of
Powerstrip to set up. There is no "inf file" provided by the manufacturer,
the Windows defaults don't even show the aspect ratio it supports, and the
reporting mechanism clearly is not providing information concerning the
resolutions supported, or if it is then the ATI drivers or Windows are
ignoring that information.

So much for your notions about "inf files" allowing for full support of any
monitor.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 9:55:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:

> And I am running my $8K monitor in a mode that requires the use of
> Powerstrip to set up. There is no "inf file" provided by the manufacturer,
> the Windows defaults don't even show the aspect ratio it supports, and the
> reporting mechanism clearly is not providing information concerning the
> resolutions supported, or if it is then the ATI drivers or Windows are
> ignoring that information.

Pretty poor monitor if you ask me, if it didn't come with that kind of
support, be it software or hardware. Either that, or it really is an 8K
monitor, in which case I wonder why you have it paired up with the likes
of ATi and MS Windows.

It seems to me the only reason for your posts - besides introducing a TV
that was never mentioned before - is to boast an over-expensive monitor,
because you neither have the software or hardware the person asking the
question is referring to. Have fun with the ATi and 8K monitor. I
suggest lounging in alt.comp.periphs.my8kmonitorishot
December 14, 2004 3:16:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

private1964@aol.com (PRIVATE1964) wrote in
news:20041211235800.08281.00002373@mb-m04.aol.com...

>> Does GF3 support custom resolution? Can you do it through nvidia's
>> control panel? thanks
>
> I'm not sure what you mean by custom resolution.
>
> You can only use resolutions that your monitor supports.
> You can change the resolutions in the display panel, it will hide
> resolutions your monitor can not do.
>

I mean a resolution other than the usual 800x600, 1024x768, 1600x1200,
etc. For ex, something funky like 1440x900 (16:10).

I have an Apple Cinema HD 23". I'm going to give the HP L2335 a try
next.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 3:24:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>
>Nope. There may be defaults but there is no "inf file" unless one is
>specifically provided.

There is always an inf file involved somewhere, even if Windows uses defaults.
The drivers are not just gonna guess what it should or should not use for
resolutions.

>It's 2004. A monitor that receives a signal that it can't handle flashes
>"signal out of range" and disconnects the video port.

Not all monitors will do that, especially if the OP is using an older monitor.

>But Windows does provide a set of "safe" defaults. OS defaults are not an
>"inf file".

Yes they are. They are a basic set of resolutions that all monitors should be
able to handle going by spec. If you look through the inf folder in windows
there is an actual inf file for defaults. Win95, 98, ME, SE all did it with a
default SVGA inf file. Windows XP might actually have it internally coded in
the OS, but its still there somewhere.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 3:28:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>I find it interesting that you reference the entech site for a couple of
>utilities but then recommend something other than Powerstrip for setting
>resolutions and timings.


Powerstrip is good if you want to change every little setting possible, but
most don't need all that extra stuff...I know I don't. RefreshForce is great
simple to use problem to change resolutions if thats all you needIMO.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 3:48:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>There are no "inf files" "in hardware inside the monitor". An "inf file"
>is, by definition, a file with the extension ".inf". The mechanism by
>which a monitor reports its capabilities does not involve a file.

That's what I meant. I didn't mean it was an actual inf file, just that it does
what an actual inf does.

>I was using it as an example of a situation in which the mechanisms you
>believe to be reliable fail.

I don't ever recall anything about that.

>And I am running my $8K monitor in a mode that requires the use of
>Powerstrip to set up. There is no "inf file" provided by the manufacturer,
>the Windows defaults don't even show the aspect ratio it supports, and the
>reporting mechanism clearly is not providing information concerning the
>resolutions supported, or if it is then the ATI drivers or Windows are
>ignoring that information.
>
>So much for your notions about "inf files" allowing for full support of any
>monitor.

If you paid 8K for a monitor and it didn't come with an inf file you should get
your money back. If your talking about a HDTV used as a monitor. Its a dual
purpose device, but I don't think the main purpose is to be connected to a
computer. So I doubt it has any internal resolution information anyway. So you
deal with it, and you did with PowerStrip. I think RefreshForce is better
because it doesn't have all the extra bells and whistles you probably don't
need.

That kind of device came out long after WindowsXP was released. They might even
an update for that kind of device, but the inf file should be furnished by the
company that made the HDTV. Another thing to consider is if your video card can
actually support the resolutions you want to display.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 4:48:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

>I mean a resolution other than the usual 800x600, 1024x768, 1600x1200,
>etc. For ex, something funky like 1440x900 (16:10).
>
>I have an Apple Cinema HD 23". I'm going to give the HP L2335 a try
>next.

In that case I would give RefreshForce a try. You can input any resolution you
want. PowerStrip will work also, but it comes with a lot of extra things you
probably don't need.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 4:14:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

"darius" <noone@here.invalid> wrote in message
news:6789595063.8554256396.38334@news.verizon.net...
> private1964@aol.com (PRIVATE1964) wrote in
> news:20041211235800.08281.00002373@mb-m04.aol.com...
>
>>> Does GF3 support custom resolution? Can you do it through nvidia's
>>> control panel? thanks
>>
>> I'm not sure what you mean by custom resolution.
>>
>> You can only use resolutions that your monitor supports.
>> You can change the resolutions in the display panel, it will hide
>> resolutions your monitor can not do.
>>
>
> I mean a resolution other than the usual 800x600, 1024x768, 1600x1200,
> etc. For ex, something funky like 1440x900 (16:10).
>
> I have an Apple Cinema HD 23". I'm going to give the HP L2335 a try
> next.

GeForce 6 will support this 20" / 23" Apple Cinema Dsiplay -
http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia.cfg/php/endus...

CapFusion,...
Anonymous
December 21, 2004 5:29:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

"PRIVATE1964" <private1964@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20041216194347.05986.00001416@mb-m19.aol.com...
> >GeForce 6 will support this 20" / 23" Apple Cinema Dsiplay -
>>
>>http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia.cfg/php/endus...
> _sid=VuxqW8th&p_lva=42&p_li=&p_faqid=157&p_created=1101768818
>>
>>CapFusion,...
>
> He has a Geforce 3 Ti200

Oops,
If it a Ti200, then no.

CapFusion,...
!