Power supply fan noisy

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.

Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
be good to ask for advice on how to:

get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet

a source for a replacement.

anything special I should be aware of.

Thanks.
9 answers Last reply
More about power supply noisy
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    supply.

    I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped power
    supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.

    Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside. They
    customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's power
    leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching the
    (usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new fan to
    the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the wires.
    Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable tie
    and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping. Attach
    the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close up
    the power supply.

    However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is either
    standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost should
    run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.

    Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any other
    fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of dust
    gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air works
    especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by debris.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:

    >
    >The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >
    >Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >
    > get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >
    > a source for a replacement.
    >
    > anything special I should be aware of.
    >
    >Thanks.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.

    Is there an online source you can recommend?


    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    >supply.
    >
    >I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped power
    >supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >
    >Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside. They
    >customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's power
    >leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching the
    >(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new fan to
    >the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the wires.
    >Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable tie
    >and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping. Attach
    >the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close up
    >the power supply.
    >
    >However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is either
    >standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost should
    >run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >
    >Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any other
    >fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of dust
    >gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air works
    >especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by debris.
    >
    >... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>
    >>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>
    >> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>
    >> a source for a replacement.
    >>
    >> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>
    >>Thanks.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:4253e239.5112103@nntp.charter.net...
    > The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    > supply.
    >
    > I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    > customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped
    > power
    > supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >
    > Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside.
    > They
    > customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's
    > power
    > leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching
    > the
    > (usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new
    > fan to
    > the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the
    > wires.
    > Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable
    > tie
    > and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping.
    > Attach
    > the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close
    > up
    > the power supply.
    >
    > However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is
    > either
    > standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost
    > should
    > run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >
    > Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    > compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any
    > other
    > fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of
    > dust
    > gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air
    > works
    > especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by
    > debris.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>
    >>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>
    >> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>
    >> a source for a replacement.
    >>
    >> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>
    >>Thanks.
    >

    Agree totally with Ben here. It would be just as easy to replace the power
    supply. They make some very good, quiet power supply's nowdays. For a bit
    more $$$ you can even get a fanless power supply if you're so inclined.

    On a side note, I just had to replace a Compaq Power supply at work. God I
    hate non-standard proprietary parts! Compaq's got to have that market
    covered for sure. Cost $120 for a 250W PS. At least Compaq threw in next
    day shipping at no charge... I did find an alternative use for the Antec I
    bough in anticipation of a simple fix ;-)


    --
    "Hurricane" Andrew
    Milford, DE
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    I replaced mine with a Sparkle 300w one no problem, $25 is what I paid for
    mine I think. Go to http://www.pricewatch.com/ and search for "sparkle atx
    300w" and a bunch should come up.

    Smith

    "j walker" <SC@alltel.net> wrote in message
    news:640951pf3sk4k6i7bojrdn5lgigco3tn82@4ax.com...
    > Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    > trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.
    >
    > Is there an online source you can recommend?
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    > (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    >>supply.
    >>
    >>I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >>customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped
    >>power
    >>supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >>
    >>Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside.
    >>They
    >>customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's
    >>power
    >>leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching
    >>the
    >>(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new
    >>fan to
    >>the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the
    >>wires.
    >>Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable
    >>tie
    >>and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping.
    >>Attach
    >>the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close
    >>up
    >>the power supply.
    >>
    >>However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is
    >>either
    >>standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost
    >>should
    >>run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >>
    >>Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >>compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any
    >>other
    >>fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of
    >>dust
    >>gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air
    >>works
    >>especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by
    >>debris.
    >>
    >>... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>>
    >>>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>>
    >>> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>>
    >>> a source for a replacement.
    >>>
    >>> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    According to the Gateway web site, the power supply photo appears to be a
    standard ATX form factor with P4 12v power connector and SATA drive power
    connectors. The power supply is rated at 300w. If this is accurate, there is
    no reason to pay extortion for a Gateway-branded power supply.

    PC Power & Cooling sells good power supplies, tho they are pricey. Egghead,
    CompUSA, Fry's may all have on-line sales of power supplies. Beyond that, I'm
    not sure... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 19:37:57 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:

    >Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    >trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.
    >
    >Is there an online source you can recommend?
    >
    >
    >On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    >>supply.
    >>
    >>I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >>customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped power
    >>supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >>
    >>Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside. They
    >>customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's power
    >>leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching the
    >>(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new fan to
    >>the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the wires.
    >>Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable tie
    >>and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping. Attach
    >>the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close up
    >>the power supply.
    >>
    >>However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is either
    >>standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost should
    >>run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >>
    >>Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >>compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any other
    >>fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of dust
    >>gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air works
    >>especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by debris.
    >>
    >>... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>>
    >>>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>>
    >>> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>>
    >>> a source for a replacement.
    >>>
    >>> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    www.newegg.com

    Best source of stuff in the business.


    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 04:13:10 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >According to the Gateway web site, the power supply photo appears to be a
    >standard ATX form factor with P4 12v power connector and SATA drive power
    >connectors. The power supply is rated at 300w. If this is accurate, there is
    >no reason to pay extortion for a Gateway-branded power supply.
    >
    >PC Power & Cooling sells good power supplies, tho they are pricey. Egghead,
    >CompUSA, Fry's may all have on-line sales of power supplies. Beyond that, I'm
    >not sure... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 19:37:57 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    >>trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.
    >>
    >>Is there an online source you can recommend?
    >>
    >>
    >>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    >>>supply.
    >>>
    >>>I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >>>customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped power
    >>>supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >>>
    >>>Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside. They
    >>>customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's power
    >>>leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching the
    >>>(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new fan to
    >>>the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the wires.
    >>>Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable tie
    >>>and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping. Attach
    >>>the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close up
    >>>the power supply.
    >>>
    >>>However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is either
    >>>standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost should
    >>>run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >>>
    >>>Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >>>compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any other
    >>>fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of dust
    >>>gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air works
    >>>especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by debris.
    >>>
    >>>... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>>>
    >>>>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>>>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>>>
    >>>> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>>>
    >>>> a source for a replacement.
    >>>>
    >>>> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks.
    >>


    ----------------

    "Jim, you think he's with Jesus now? We only have 30 seconds." - Larry King to "Passion" star Jim Caviezel, on the Pope.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Sparkle brand power supplies have a higher-than-normal failure rate, at least in
    Central Massachusetts... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 7 Apr 2005 03:55:10 -0400, "Smith" <rangerxlt92@cox.net> wrote:

    >I replaced mine with a Sparkle 300w one no problem, $25 is what I paid for
    >mine I think. Go to http://www.pricewatch.com/ and search for "sparkle atx
    >300w" and a bunch should come up.
    >
    >Smith
    >
    >"j walker" <SC@alltel.net> wrote in message
    >news:640951pf3sk4k6i7bojrdn5lgigco3tn82@4ax.com...
    >> Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    >> trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.
    >>
    >> Is there an online source you can recommend?
    >>
    >>
    >> On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >> (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the power
    >>>supply.
    >>>
    >>>I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >>>customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped
    >>>power
    >>>supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >>>
    >>>Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board inside.
    >>>They
    >>>customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's
    >>>power
    >>>leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by detaching
    >>>the
    >>>(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the new
    >>>fan to
    >>>the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of the
    >>>wires.
    >>>Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic cable
    >>>tie
    >>>and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping.
    >>>Attach
    >>>the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and close
    >>>up
    >>>the power supply.
    >>>
    >>>However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is
    >>>either
    >>>standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement cost
    >>>should
    >>>run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >>>
    >>>Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >>>compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan, any
    >>>other
    >>>fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit of
    >>>dust
    >>>gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air
    >>>works
    >>>especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by
    >>>debris.
    >>>
    >>>... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>>>
    >>>>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>>>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>>>
    >>>> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>>>
    >>>> a source for a replacement.
    >>>>
    >>>> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks.
    >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Thanks to everybody for the advice.

    As it sometimes happens, I found a local guy that had a fan that would
    fit and I took my power supply over and for $10.00 he installed the
    new fan while I waited. And later when I couldn't remember where all
    the plugs went he helped over the phone.

    I couldn't have asked for more.


    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:

    >
    >The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >
    >Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >
    > get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >
    > a source for a replacement.
    >
    > anything special I should be aware of.
    >
    >Thanks.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Really? People I talked to before I bought it said they were great...mine's
    still going strong at least.


    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:42552c9b.5456842@nntp.charter.net...
    > Sparkle brand power supplies have a higher-than-normal failure rate, at
    > least in
    > Central Massachusetts... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 7 Apr 2005 03:55:10 -0400, "Smith" <rangerxlt92@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I replaced mine with a Sparkle 300w one no problem, $25 is what I paid for
    >>mine I think. Go to http://www.pricewatch.com/ and search for "sparkle
    >>atx
    >>300w" and a bunch should come up.
    >>
    >>Smith
    >>
    >>"j walker" <SC@alltel.net> wrote in message
    >>news:640951pf3sk4k6i7bojrdn5lgigco3tn82@4ax.com...
    >>> Ben, Thanks for the advice. I live on a farm and it is a 100+ mile
    >>> trip to anyplace that I might find a power supply.
    >>>
    >>> Is there an online source you can recommend?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:29:12 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>> (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>The normal procedure used to repair most computers is to replace the
    >>>>power
    >>>>supply.
    >>>>
    >>>>I rarely deviate from the normal procedure. I did so last week when a
    >>>>customer's ugly Compaq computer showed up here with a strangely shaped
    >>>>power
    >>>>supply, which would have cost $100 just to replace plus my labor charge.
    >>>>
    >>>>Power supply fans are soldered directly to the small circuit board
    >>>>inside.
    >>>>They
    >>>>customarily operate at 12v. Open up the power supply. Snip the fan's
    >>>>power
    >>>>leads as close to the fan itself as possible. Remove the fan by
    >>>>detaching
    >>>>the
    >>>>(usually) 4 screws that hold it in. Now solder the wire leads of the
    >>>>new
    >>>>fan to
    >>>>the leads coming from inside the power supply, matching the colors of
    >>>>the
    >>>>wires.
    >>>>Tape the soldering job tightly with electrical tape. Take a plastic
    >>>>cable
    >>>>tie
    >>>>and tighten it around the electrical tape to keep it from unwrapping.
    >>>>Attach
    >>>>the new fan inside the power supply, tuck the wires back inside, and
    >>>>close
    >>>>up
    >>>>the power supply.
    >>>>
    >>>>However, you are much better off replacing the power supply if it is
    >>>>either
    >>>>standard ATX or one of the semi-standard microATX ones. Replacement
    >>>>cost
    >>>>should
    >>>>run no more than $30 or $40, unless the seller is ripping you off.
    >>>>
    >>>>Even before attempting replacement, open up the chassis and use a can of
    >>>>compressed air to blow all the dust out of the power supply, its fan,
    >>>>any
    >>>>other
    >>>>fans, and all nooks and crannies inside the computer. Sometimes a bit
    >>>>of
    >>>>dust
    >>>>gets lodged in the fan where it makes a lot of noise. Compressed air
    >>>>works
    >>>>especially when the fan bearings have not been seriously damaged by
    >>>>debris.
    >>>>
    >>>>... Ben Myers
    >>>>
    >>>>On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 07:14:51 -0500, j walker <SC@alltel.net> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The fan on the power supply of my 500 MX is failing.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Since I have never done anything like this before I thought it might
    >>>>>be good to ask for advice on how to:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> get the fan off the power supply and out of the cabinet
    >>>>>
    >>>>> a source for a replacement.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> anything special I should be aware of.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thanks.
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
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