6600 GT too noisy.

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Anyone with this problem ?
I have an XFX, 128M AGP. Watching a movie is a pain... Anyone knows if
there's a quieter heatsink replacement around ?
24 answers Last reply
More about 6600 noisy
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Arctic Cooling's various VGA Silencer models would fit the bill very well.

    That, or up the volume or get good headphones.

    --
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
    It can therefore be said that politics is war without
    bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."


    "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:34if18F4aq8jbU1@individual.net...
    > Anyone with this problem ?
    > I have an XFX, 128M AGP. Watching a movie is a pain... Anyone knows if
    > there's a quieter heatsink replacement around ?
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    > Arctic Cooling's various VGA Silencer models would fit the bill very well.
    Once they come out with one for the 6600 GT.


    --
    Ed Light

    Smiley :-/
    MS Smiley :-\

    Send spam to the FTC at
    uce@ftc.gov
    Thanks, robots.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 17:00:11 -0000, "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.com> wrote:

    >Anyone with this problem ?
    >I have an XFX, 128M AGP. Watching a movie is a pain...

    Tried using surround/Dolby 5.1 headphones ?
    Keeps out other noises too, like nagging wives.... :-) :-)


    John Lewis


    > Anyone knows if
    >there's a quieter heatsink replacement around ?
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    The bolt pattern should be the same as either the 6800's, the FX series, or
    the Radeons.

    --
    "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
    It can therefore be said that politics is war without
    bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."


    "Ed Light" <nobody@nobody.there> wrote in message
    news:di0Fd.1058$_d4.178@fed1read05...
    > > Arctic Cooling's various VGA Silencer models would fit the bill very
    well.
    > Once they come out with one for the 6600 GT.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "First of One" <daxinfx@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:i8OdnUab2bjna3jcRVn-og@rogers.com...
    > The bolt pattern should be the same as either the 6800's, the FX series,
    or
    > the Radeons.
    >
    They don't have anything in stock for 6600.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on the red
    wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the ohm rating
    accordingly.

    DaveL


    "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:34np3iF4d7qefU1@individual.net...
    > "First of One" <daxinfx@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:i8OdnUab2bjna3jcRVn-og@rogers.com...
    > > The bolt pattern should be the same as either the 6800's, the FX series,
    > or
    > > the Radeons.
    > >
    > They don't have anything in stock for 6600.
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    zalman sell one got the 6600gt, its sitting here beside me until I get my
    act together....

    check www.quietpc.com

    "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:34if18F4aq8jbU1@individual.net...
    > Anyone with this problem ?
    > I have an XFX, 128M AGP. Watching a movie is a pain... Anyone knows if
    > there's a quieter heatsink replacement around ?
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    John Muir" <John.Muir@ukgateway.net> wrote in message
    news:rN6dneiLxopDZXvcRVnyuQ@pipex.net...
    > zalman sell one got the 6600gt, its sitting here beside me until I get my
    > act together....
    >
    > check www.quietpc.com
    >
    Which model have you got ? I contacted zalman as well and they told me that
    any model would fit on a 6600.
    Did you get the heatsink only or even the fan ?
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    DaveL wrote:

    > If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    > the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    > ohm rating accordingly.

    Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop just
    about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.

    --
    dvus
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So OK,
    start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable level.
    How's that?

    DaveL


    "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    > DaveL wrote:
    >
    >> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >> ohm rating accordingly.
    >
    > Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop just
    > about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >
    > --
    > dvus
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    DaveL wrote:
    > "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    > news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >> DaveL wrote:

    >>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce
    >>> the ohm rating accordingly.

    >> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would
    >> drop just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.

    > Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So
    > OK, start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an
    > acceptable level. How's that?


    --
    dvus
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    DaveL wrote:
    > "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote:
    >> DaveL wrote:

    >>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce
    >>> the ohm rating accordingly.
    >>
    >> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would
    >> drop just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.

    > Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So
    > OK, start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an
    > acceptable level. How's that?

    [sorry about the blank post, had a senior moment there]
    Yeah, that seems better, I'd guess you'd have to go down from there to get
    any speed at all from the fan.
    Might be worth mentioning that anything around 5 watts should be more than
    sufficient.

    --
    dvus
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    5 watts is way over kill. I used 1/2 watt resistors with no problems. I
    once used a 1/4 watt resistor on a cpu fan and it shorted out.

    DaveL


    "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    news:34rcm6F4e7060U1@individual.net...
    > DaveL wrote:
    >> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote:
    >>> DaveL wrote:
    >
    >>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce
    >>>> the ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>
    >>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would
    >>> drop just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >
    >> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So
    >> OK, start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an
    >> acceptable level. How's that?
    >
    > [sorry about the blank post, had a senior moment there]
    > Yeah, that seems better, I'd guess you'd have to go down from there to get
    > any speed at all from the fan.
    > Might be worth mentioning that anything around 5 watts should be more than
    > sufficient.
    >
    > --
    > dvus
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Basically you're reducing the voltage and hence the air flow...
    I am sure it needs all the air flows it has now, otherwise the fan wouldn't
    speed when plying games.

    "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:rM-dnQmscY-Ug3XcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
    > Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So OK,
    > start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable level.
    > How's that?
    >
    > DaveL
    >
    >
    > "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    > news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >> DaveL wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >>> ohm rating accordingly.
    >>
    >> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop
    >> just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>
    >> --
    >> dvus
    >>
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Yes, that's true. Reducing voltage to the fan slows it down causing it to
    quiet. The down side is reduced cooling. But many cards do not require as
    much cooling as the cheap little screamers they put on these cards make. I
    first did this mod with a Volcano cpu heatsinc/fan. Lowered the speed from
    5000 rpm to 3000. Loud computers do not belong in the house. They belong
    in a server room. I went on to mod a few GF3 cards back in the day because
    they came with these high pitched, piercing little fans. I never had one
    problem with cooling or anything else with these mods.

    DaveL


    "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:34r1inF4b2brvU1@individual.net...
    > Basically you're reducing the voltage and hence the air flow...
    > I am sure it needs all the air flows it has now, otherwise the fan
    > wouldn't speed when plying games.
    >
    > "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:rM-dnQmscY-Ug3XcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
    >> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So OK,
    >> start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable level.
    >> How's that?
    >>
    >> DaveL
    >>
    >>
    >> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    >> news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >>> DaveL wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >>>> ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>
    >>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop
    >>> just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> dvus
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    DaveL wrote:
    > "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    > news:34rcm6F4e7060U1@individual.net...
    >> DaveL wrote:
    >>> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote:
    >>>> DaveL wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce
    >>>>> the ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would
    >>>> drop just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>
    >>> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So
    >>> OK, start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an
    >>> acceptable level. How's that?
    >>
    >> [sorry about the blank post, had a senior moment there]
    >> Yeah, that seems better, I'd guess you'd have to go down from there
    >> to get any speed at all from the fan.
    >> Might be worth mentioning that anything around 5 watts should be
    >> more than sufficient.

    > 5 watts is way over kill. I used 1/2 watt resistors with no
    > problems. I once used a 1/4 watt resistor on a cpu fan and it
    > shorted out.

    I believe in building things to be bullet proof. I actually figured it out
    to be 1-1/2 watts, but went big to be sure.

    --
    dvus
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct me
    to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)


    "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:YMadnS6MFKXhynXcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    > Yes, that's true. Reducing voltage to the fan slows it down causing it to
    > quiet. The down side is reduced cooling. But many cards do not require
    > as much cooling as the cheap little screamers they put on these cards
    > make. I first did this mod with a Volcano cpu heatsinc/fan. Lowered the
    > speed from 5000 rpm to 3000. Loud computers do not belong in the house.
    > They belong in a server room. I went on to mod a few GF3 cards back in
    > the day because they came with these high pitched, piercing little fans.
    > I never had one problem with cooling or anything else with these mods.
    >
    > DaveL
    >
    >
    > "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:34r1inF4b2brvU1@individual.net...
    >> Basically you're reducing the voltage and hence the air flow...
    >> I am sure it needs all the air flows it has now, otherwise the fan
    >> wouldn't speed when plying games.
    >>
    >> "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >> news:rM-dnQmscY-Ug3XcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
    >>> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So OK,
    >>> start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable
    >>> level. How's that?
    >>>
    >>> DaveL
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >>>> DaveL wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >>>>> ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop
    >>>> just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> dvus
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    If you know what you are doing, it would be quite easy to solder in a 1k or
    5k ohm potentiometer, sometimes called a pot or rheostat. These have three
    connections. Cut the red lead of the fan and attach one end to the middle
    leg of the pot and the other end to one of the other legs. This way you can
    dial in the desired resistance from zero ohms all the way up to the maximum
    of the pot. It's best to check the operation of the pot with an ohm meter.
    Set the pot initially for zero ohms and begin turning till the fan quiets.

    DaveL


    "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:34sdsvF4f6uq8U1@individual.net...
    > You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct
    > me to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    > Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)
    >
    >
    > "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:YMadnS6MFKXhynXcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    >> Yes, that's true. Reducing voltage to the fan slows it down causing it
    >> to quiet. The down side is reduced cooling. But many cards do not
    >> require as much cooling as the cheap little screamers they put on these
    >> cards make. I first did this mod with a Volcano cpu heatsinc/fan.
    >> Lowered the speed from 5000 rpm to 3000. Loud computers do not belong in
    >> the house. They belong in a server room. I went on to mod a few GF3
    >> cards back in the day because they came with these high pitched, piercing
    >> little fans. I never had one problem with cooling or anything else with
    >> these mods.
    >>
    >> DaveL
    >>
    >>
    >> "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:34r1inF4b2brvU1@individual.net...
    >>> Basically you're reducing the voltage and hence the air flow...
    >>> I am sure it needs all the air flows it has now, otherwise the fan
    >>> wouldn't speed when plying games.
    >>>
    >>> "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:rM-dnQmscY-Ug3XcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
    >>>> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So OK,
    >>>> start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable
    >>>> level. How's that?
    >>>>
    >>>> DaveL
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >>>>> DaveL wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >>>>>> ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop
    >>>>> just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> dvus
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=35-118-217&depa=0
    Here is a essentially the same think already made by Zalman. I think the
    connector are for cpu and case fans but could be retrofitted for vga use
    with some ingenuity.

    This is real elaborate.
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=13-999-503&depa=0
    They come in black too.

    DaveL


    "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:HaadnSCRjdsx0nTcRVn-pg@comcast.com...
    > If you know what you are doing, it would be quite easy to solder in a 1k
    > or 5k ohm potentiometer, sometimes called a pot or rheostat. These have
    > three connections. Cut the red lead of the fan and attach one end to the
    > middle leg of the pot and the other end to one of the other legs. This
    > way you can dial in the desired resistance from zero ohms all the way up
    > to the maximum of the pot. It's best to check the operation of the pot
    > with an ohm meter. Set the pot initially for zero ohms and begin turning
    > till the fan quiets.
    >
    > DaveL
    >
    >
    > "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:34sdsvF4f6uq8U1@individual.net...
    >> You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct
    >> me to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    >> Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)
    >>
    >>
    >> "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >> news:YMadnS6MFKXhynXcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    >>> Yes, that's true. Reducing voltage to the fan slows it down causing it
    >>> to quiet. The down side is reduced cooling. But many cards do not
    >>> require as much cooling as the cheap little screamers they put on these
    >>> cards make. I first did this mod with a Volcano cpu heatsinc/fan.
    >>> Lowered the speed from 5000 rpm to 3000. Loud computers do not belong
    >>> in the house. They belong in a server room. I went on to mod a few GF3
    >>> cards back in the day because they came with these high pitched,
    >>> piercing little fans. I never had one problem with cooling or anything
    >>> else with these mods.
    >>>
    >>> DaveL
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>> news:34r1inF4b2brvU1@individual.net...
    >>>> Basically you're reducing the voltage and hence the air flow...
    >>>> I am sure it needs all the air flows it has now, otherwise the fan
    >>>> wouldn't speed when plying games.
    >>>>
    >>>> "DaveL" <dave1027@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:rM-dnQmscY-Ug3XcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
    >>>>> Well, it's been a while since I did that trick. Maybe it's 1k. So
    >>>>> OK, start with 1k and increase till the noise is down to an acceptable
    >>>>> level. How's that?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> DaveL
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "dvus" <dven1invalid@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:34qe4jF4a85uvU1@individual.net...
    >>>>>> DaveL wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >>>>>>> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce
    >>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>> ohm rating accordingly.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop
    >>>>>> just about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> dvus
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 11:42:28 -0000, "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote:

    >You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct me
    >to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    >Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)

    If you're determined to mod the fan speed then you might want to look
    into PWM (pulse width modulation) control instead of a "heat emitting
    resistor."

    There are several methods to achieve PWM control. Many websites have
    plans for 555-based controllers with temperature sensing. I would
    probably use a small (8 pin) microcontroller with an A/D input and PWM
    output for additional "smarts."

    Google for "pwm fan regulator OR controller"

    --
    Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >
    >You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct me
    >to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    >Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)

    This works very well with fans, is cheap, and has a high wattage rating. In
    case you decide to ever use it with a different fan.

    http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=470&item=RHE-1
    5&type=store
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >DaveL wrote:
    >
    >> If you can solder, this is a fix. Put a 10k resistor in series on
    >> the red wire going to the fan. If the fan turns too slow, reduce the
    >> ohm rating accordingly.
    >
    >Wow, are you sure about that 10k resistor? Seems like that would drop just
    >about all the 12VDC to almost nothing for the fan.

    It certainly would.

    I use 3-watt resistors in my system to slow my fans, but I suggest the value of
    the resistor should be in the range 27ohm, 33ohm, 47ohm or 68ohm.

    I use 68ohm for my 120ohms for my 2 120mm case fans and still get reasonable
    airflow but are almost silent.

    HTH

    Mike
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    >On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 11:42:28 -0000, "MaSTeR" <sorry@nospam.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>You convinced me, I have nothing to lose to give it a try. Can you direct me
    >>to web pages to have a quick glance ???
    >>Once I am there it would be nice to put a knob to regulated fan speed ;)
    >
    >If you're determined to mod the fan speed then you might want to look
    >into PWM (pulse width modulation) control instead of a "heat emitting
    >resistor."
    >
    >There are several methods to achieve PWM control. Many websites have
    >plans for 555-based controllers with temperature sensing. I would
    >probably use a small (8 pin) microcontroller with an A/D input and PWM
    >output for additional "smarts."
    >
    >Google for "pwm fan regulator OR controller"


    The only problem with PWM controllers is their tendency to induce a slight
    clicking into the fan due to the power being switched on-off quickly. I've
    tried several and found it can be annoying and is especially noticeable when you
    run a very quiet system.
    One can get a little paranoid and start hearing the slightest small noise
    especially when the m/c is very quiet and its located on a desk almost at ear
    level so I've stopped using them for the reason above.

    I have used 3watt resistors in the past to do the job, or just using +5 & +12v
    to give 7v works well, and yes most methods have their +/- .

    There really should not be any heat generation from a 3watt resistor unless its
    being loaded by 2 or more fans, plus the fact that the product of using a
    resistor in series will reduce the total current being drawn by the fan.
    PWM control is certainly the most efficient but its also the noisiest.
    Have you ever listened to the ones produced by Vantec, even the controllers
    themselves create a ticking sound which one can hear if very close.

    I currently use a very simple controller, where I have stripped off all the
    components from a 31/2" Vantec unit and use 317T variable voltage regs instead,
    yes there is a small amount of slight warmth from the regs but only just! and it
    suits my purpose well.

    I find that when you get your system very quiet especially if your located in a
    quiet room you start hearing sounds you wouldn't normally hear. I have a 120mm
    fan in a new power supply which has a tendency to resonate very slightly, my
    wife cannot hear it but I find it annoys me, and no doubt I shall be swapping
    the fan for another before long. :-)))

    I hate noisy systems and have gone to some lengths to make it quite. ie.
    replaced chipset cooler fans with large home made passive h/sink, removed fan
    from my 6800gt card and I now use a home-made blank pci card which carries a
    slowed down 80mm fan and blows air onto the agp card from the adjacent slot.
    I tried one of the Artic Cooler vga silencers but found they were still a little
    too noisy for my liking. A couple of slowed down 120mm case and side fans
    complete the job and the system is very quiet indeed.

    The secret is big fans running slow.


    Best wishes

    Mike
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Mike wrote:

    [snip]
    > I hate noisy systems and have gone to some lengths to make it quite.
    > ie. replaced chipset cooler fans with large home made passive h/sink,
    > removed fan from my 6800gt card and I now use a home-made blank pci
    > card which carries a slowed down 80mm fan and blows air onto the agp
    > card from the adjacent slot.
    > I tried one of the Artic Cooler vga silencers but found they were
    > still a little too noisy for my liking. A couple of slowed down 120mm
    > case and side fans complete the job and the system is very quiet
    > indeed.

    Wow, you wouldn't like my system at ALL. But, I find the sounds of 8 or so
    fans blowing heat off stuff kinda reassuring.

    --
    dvus
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