Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Magnetic Memory Manipulated by Voltage, Not Just Heat

Last response: in News comments
Share
a b } Memory
September 1, 2011 10:29:14 AM

I am going to log on to my university's library and have a look at that journal.
Score
6
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
September 1, 2011 10:38:52 AM

"almost instantaneously"? Well that's not instantaneous enough for computing performance expected today :|

However if it uses less power than SRAM it will surely find it's purpose.
Score
0
a b } Memory
September 1, 2011 10:49:13 AM

No, I don't see it saying almost instantaneously in the journal.

"The increasing voltage leads to more and more obvious change of Hc, but after switching-off the voltages each time, the DHc goes back to around zero instantaneously" (Wang et al. 2011)

Score
1
September 1, 2011 1:00:07 PM

PyreeNo, I don't see it saying almost instantaneously in the journal."The increasing voltage leads to more and more obvious change of Hc, but after switching-off the voltages each time, the DHc goes back to around zero instantaneously" (Wang et al. 2011)

"For example, the researchers demonstrate that the effect can be turned on and off almost instantaneously, whereas the changes should lag if heat is the cause."
Score
-1
September 1, 2011 1:08:07 PM

@amigafan, that was sentence from the this page article, written by THG journalist not by researchers.
Score
1
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 1, 2011 2:26:58 PM

The key to perpetual motion is here... now if we can just figure out displacement in order to bypass inertia, then off to Xanadu we go =)
Score
0
September 1, 2011 2:33:58 PM

Props to you Pyree for looking up and linking to the article.
Score
1
September 1, 2011 3:06:54 PM

Oh man, I am so happy to be an Applied Physics undergrad :p 
Score
0
September 1, 2011 4:03:45 PM

I wonder what the next ASUS chinese marketing slogans will be brought to the table with this. Either way, here is hoping to affordable 20TB storage by the end of next 2 or so years.
Score
0
September 1, 2011 5:20:42 PM

Wait...they just figured this out? Are you kidding? Applying a voltage induces a current which will produce a magnetic field. Hmmm, wonder if I can apply this most SIMPLE and BASIC physics model to force something into a desired state...

OK, so the journal article is much more detailed and applies to specific materials and substrates...but this shouldn't come as a surprising find.
Score
-1
September 1, 2011 6:26:09 PM

kajohn10Wait...they just figured this out? Are you kidding? Applying a voltage induces a current which will produce a magnetic field. Hmmm, wonder if I can apply this most SIMPLE and BASIC physics model to force something into a desired state...OK, so the journal article is much more detailed and applies to specific materials and substrates...but this shouldn't come as a surprising find.


If it's so easy why won't you show them how it's done.
Score
1
September 1, 2011 9:08:36 PM

ParsianOh man, I am so happy to be an Applied Physics undergrad


Applied Physics... Engineering?
Score
0
September 1, 2011 11:19:29 PM

Does anyone know where I can find a battering ram? Wait, wrong article.
Score
0
September 2, 2011 12:01:34 AM

noblerabbitI wonder what the next ASUS chinese marketing slogans will be brought to the table with this.


Hint: ASUS is Taiwanese ;) 
Score
0
!