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Ed, one more question

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 29, 2005 7:34:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Hello Ed.

One question please. I have decided to do a complete
reinstall on this new laptop, to get rid of all the garbage I dont want on
this computer, and get it just the way I want it.
I have a retail win xp pro, which I understand the
licensure, it can be installed on my desktop, as well as one laptop.
Since I have stated, this is my first laptop, 1) Is there
anything different on reinstalling and building my harddrive on this laptop,
as oppossed to a desktop?
2) Gateway, partitioned this hard drive with the restore feature
on one part. If I am doing my own reinstall, I dont need this feature, and
want the full hard drive back? Any thing I should look out for?
3) I usuall use ntsf, is this okay on a laptop as well?

Much thanks Ed, and to all on
this wonderful newsgroup. Jerry

More about : question

June 29, 2005 8:16:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 15:34:55 GMT, "J.Lef" <j.lef@verizon.net> wrote:

Jerry, since all of the computers I have ever purchased, including
this last Gateway Laptop, have come with actual, real restoration/OS
disks, I don't know how one would do this without a disk containing
all the specific computer's drivers and such needed for a fresh new
installation. As stated before, I got two disks with my GW Laptop,
the Applications & Drivers disk and the OS disk. Before installing
the OS (XP) I need to run the Applications & Drivers disk which, when
finished, will tell me when to put the OS disk in to continue with the
installation of the OS (XP). I assume you will have to generate a
driver's disk to install the system drivers before attempting to
install your new retail copy of XP. I'm sorry but I don't know how to
tell you to get those specific drivers loaded onto a recovery disk.

However, I'm sure others on here have 'been there, done that' and will
jump in and lead you though the process.

However to a few of your questions.... My GW Laptop is formatted to a
single NTFS Partition which is taken care of for me when running the
restoration disks. You should end up with the same without any
problems.

Regards,
Ed


> Hello Ed.
>
> One question please. I have decided to do a complete
>reinstall on this new laptop, to get rid of all the garbage I dont want on
>this computer, and get it just the way I want it.
> I have a retail win xp pro, which I understand the
>licensure, it can be installed on my desktop, as well as one laptop.
> Since I have stated, this is my first laptop, 1) Is there
>anything different on reinstalling and building my harddrive on this laptop,
>as oppossed to a desktop?
> 2) Gateway, partitioned this hard drive with the restore feature
>on one part. If I am doing my own reinstall, I dont need this feature, and
>want the full hard drive back? Any thing I should look out for?
> 3) I usuall use ntsf, is this okay on a laptop as well?
>
> Much thanks Ed, and to all on
>this wonderful newsgroup. Jerry
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 12:29:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

I assume you will have to generate a
> driver's disk to install the system drivers before attempting to
> install your new retail copy of XP. I'm sorry but I don't know how to
> tell you to get those specific drivers loaded onto a recovery disk.
>
Thanks Ed, I will just fiddle around with it, till I
get it right. I always have the self made "restorations disks" that I can
use if nothing else fails. I just hate it when you get a system, or a
program, and it doesnt give you a choice sometimes what you want installed,
and it puts a lot of junk onto your computer, that is sometimes difficult or
impossible to remove. Norton , I used to love, but lately the last few
years, it has become so much more invasive on ones system, almost like a
virus unto itself.
On my last two builds, I have been using pccillian, and I
find it a superior program, and I have seen reports from other places,
stating the same.


Much regards Jerry
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 1:08:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Jerry,

As long as the Windows install media matches the Certificate of Authentication
with Product ID attached to the computer, reinstall as you please.

If you are installing XP Pro on a system delivered with XP Home, you need to
install XP Pro with a unique Product ID, else Windows on-line product activation
will catch it.

Nothing different in doing an install on a laptop compared to a desktop. NTFS
is fine for a laptop.

As long as you have all the CDs needed to rebuild the system, you do not need
the restore partition, and you can delete it to get back the disk space.

.... Ben Myers

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 15:34:55 GMT, "J.Lef" <j.lef@verizon.net> wrote:

> Hello Ed.
>
> One question please. I have decided to do a complete
>reinstall on this new laptop, to get rid of all the garbage I dont want on
>this computer, and get it just the way I want it.
> I have a retail win xp pro, which I understand the
>licensure, it can be installed on my desktop, as well as one laptop.
> Since I have stated, this is my first laptop, 1) Is there
>anything different on reinstalling and building my harddrive on this laptop,
>as oppossed to a desktop?
> 2) Gateway, partitioned this hard drive with the restore feature
>on one part. If I am doing my own reinstall, I dont need this feature, and
>want the full hard drive back? Any thing I should look out for?
> 3) I usuall use ntsf, is this okay on a laptop as well?
>
> Much thanks Ed, and to all on
>this wonderful newsgroup. Jerry
>
>
June 30, 2005 2:18:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 21:08:31 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
(Ben Myers) wrote:

>As long as you have all the CDs needed to rebuild the system, you do not need
>the restore partition, and you can delete it to get back the disk space.

Let me jump in here on this one Ben since I would also like to know
how this works with computers that don't have restoration disks....

I am assuming that without restoration disks, that he doesn't have the
"CDs needed to rebuild the system" you mention. Just how does he go
about "rebuilding his system" or assembling all the proper system
drivers and installing them before installing his own copy of XP?

Regards,
Ed
June 30, 2005 2:52:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 20:29:34 GMT, "j.lef" <j.lef@verizon.net> wrote:

>I always have the self made "restorations disks" that I can
>use if nothing else fails.

Good idea....

>Norton , I used to love, but lately the last few
>years, it has become so much more invasive on ones system, almost like a
>virus unto itself.

I agree. I have NAV 2005 sitting here in a box that I installed one
time and immediately wiped it completely from my system a week later
because it was Such A HOWG!. I liked the older NAV 2003 so put it
back on with a fresh subscription.

>On my last two builds, I have been using pccillian, and I
>find it a superior program, and I have seen reports from other places,
>stating the same.

I have heard nothing but good reviews on pccillian but have never
tried it myself. I'm just use to NAV 2003. But I know that soon or
later Symantec will figure out a way to stop letting 2003 owners
download virus definitions thus forcing them to upgrade to a later
model engine. Of course that will not work with me because all it
will do is force me to go with pccillian or AVG.

When you do your own builds, do you create restoration disk(s)? My
latest two desktops have been built by a reputable local builder. The
builder set them both up with XP Home and nothing more. After getting
them home, the first thing I did was delete and/or disable the XP
stuff I didn't want like that Godless Messenger and other such trash
favored by nasties to gain access to your system. Next I did all the
critical and suggested MS updates. I then did my cosmetic
customizations and got the whole thing looking the way I wanted and
then did a Ghost image of it for my restoration disks. Then I added
all my programs and utilities.

When SP2 came along, I did the complete restorations like above to get
back to basics but this time upgraded to SP2 and made a new set of
Ghost images to reflect the new Service Pack. I also SP2
slipstreamed my two OS disks.

The builder would have made the restoration disks for me for $30 each
but I decoded to learn how to run Ghost and give it a try myself.
BTW, I am using Ghost 2003 because I am told that there have been
issues with every version that has come out since 2003. Funny that
Symantec puts a copy of Ghost 2003 on the same disk as their new
version 9 so when version 9 blows up in your face, you can use the
older version 2003 to get what you wanted in the first place, an image
of your HD. These people are so unreal.

I would like to do as you and build my next system but I just don't
think I can handle that. From what I have read, there are all sorts
of compatibility issues building a new system and it would be easy to
get a bunch of parts that are not compatible with each other even
though the venders say they are.

Well, there I am getting off topic again....

Regards,
Ed
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 4:34:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

<> As long as the Windows install media matches the Certificate of
Authentication
> with Product ID attached to the computer, reinstall as you please.
>
> If you are installing XP Pro on a system delivered with XP Home, you need
> to
> install XP Pro with a unique Product ID, else Windows on-line product
> activation
> will catch it.
>
Ben, as always thanks for responding. I purchased a retail
copy of win xp pro about two years ago, and it is installed on a computer I
built. So to understand you, I can install, a copy on my laptop legally
also?
The laptop came with xp home preinstalled. if I am doing
a complete reinstall, are you saying the laptop bios, will have a way for
windows on line activation to notice it? Please elaborate a bit, sure
appreciated.......I thought microsoft allows you one install on a desktop,
and one on a laptop...(home and travel, or business)

Much regards Jerry
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 5:20:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Jerry,

To comply with Microsoft's XP licensing policy, you need a SECOND copy of XP Pro
with unique COA and product ID. In other words, one copy, one computer,
strenuously enforced. Gone are the days of a copy with went with its owner back
and forth between computers.

There is little or no reason to believe that XP Pro will not run on a newer
laptop.

Hope this helps... Ben

On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 00:34:21 GMT, "J.Lef" <j.lef@verizon.net> wrote:

>
><> As long as the Windows install media matches the Certificate of
>Authentication
>> with Product ID attached to the computer, reinstall as you please.
>>
>> If you are installing XP Pro on a system delivered with XP Home, you need
>> to
>> install XP Pro with a unique Product ID, else Windows on-line product
>> activation
>> will catch it.
>>
> Ben, as always thanks for responding. I purchased a retail
>copy of win xp pro about two years ago, and it is installed on a computer I
>built. So to understand you, I can install, a copy on my laptop legally
>also?
> The laptop came with xp home preinstalled. if I am doing
>a complete reinstall, are you saying the laptop bios, will have a way for
>windows on line activation to notice it? Please elaborate a bit, sure
>appreciated.......I thought microsoft allows you one install on a desktop,
>and one on a laptop...(home and travel, or business)
>
> Much regards Jerry
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 7:27:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Jerry would need to do the same thing that I've done repeatedly, so often that
it has become routine. For others, it is not routine.

First, determine each and every chipset inside the computer. This is more
difficult to do with a notebook than with a desktop, because you can't examine
all the chips in the system. Taking note of all the chipsets in device manager
has to suffice. Next, as a precaution, download all the required drivers from
the CHIPSET manufacturer's web site. Or, download all the drivers from the gw2k
web site, which still may be good enough in quality to have all the drivers
there (unlike the wretched HP web site). IBM, Dell, and Gateway (at least in
the past. I haven't looked lately) have customer-friendly web sites with all
the drivers one would need.

However, I might also note that the same drivers that work for XP Home will also
work for XP Pro, so any driver CD from Gateway or one of the restore CDs created
from the initial setup will have all the needed drivers.

.... Ben Myers

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 22:18:33 -0400, Ed <fake@fake.com> wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 21:08:31 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
>(Ben Myers) wrote:
>
>>As long as you have all the CDs needed to rebuild the system, you do not need
>>the restore partition, and you can delete it to get back the disk space.
>
>Let me jump in here on this one Ben since I would also like to know
>how this works with computers that don't have restoration disks....
>
>I am assuming that without restoration disks, that he doesn't have the
>"CDs needed to rebuild the system" you mention. Just how does he go
>about "rebuilding his system" or assembling all the proper system
>drivers and installing them before installing his own copy of XP?
>
>Regards,
>Ed
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 30, 2005 7:38:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

One more comment. It is second nature to me to have another computer with CD
burner nearby when I work on another computer, especially an OS install. If I
find that I need a driver for a system, I can always download it on one system,
burn a CD, and use the CD on the system being worked upon.

Clearly the most important driver to have working is a network (usually
Ethernet) driver, so other drivers can be found and downloaded. Usually the
network driver has as a prerequisite the motherboard chipset drivers, without
which the network won't work.

Most, but not all, name brand notebook computers use Intel motherboard chipsets
if the CPU is an Intel one. For Pentium II, usually Intel 440BX. For Pentium
III and Socket 370 Celeron, either 440BX, 810E, or 815E. For Pentium 4,
Centrino, and Socket 478 Celeron, an Intel 845 chipset is usual.

There I go, giving away my secrets again... Ben Myers

On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 22:18:33 -0400, Ed <fake@fake.com> wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 21:08:31 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
>(Ben Myers) wrote:
>
>>As long as you have all the CDs needed to rebuild the system, you do not need
>>the restore partition, and you can delete it to get back the disk space.
>
>Let me jump in here on this one Ben since I would also like to know
>how this works with computers that don't have restoration disks....
>
>I am assuming that without restoration disks, that he doesn't have the
>"CDs needed to rebuild the system" you mention. Just how does he go
>about "rebuilding his system" or assembling all the proper system
>drivers and installing them before installing his own copy of XP?
>
>Regards,
>Ed
!