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Seagate Launching "Industry's First" 4TB HDD

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September 7, 2011 7:08:47 PM

Keep pushing capacity... I am glad the SSD revolution isn't stymieing HDD evolution...
September 7, 2011 7:09:05 PM

I feel like this capacity should have been available a while ago. Anyway, +1 to Seagate for being the first.
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September 7, 2011 7:10:33 PM

Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?
September 7, 2011 7:12:44 PM

Cost for this drive: $249.
Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.
September 7, 2011 7:18:38 PM

hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

If you buy them yes :p  my guess is Seagate knows that most who fill this with 2,000 HD movies probably won't do it legally, but just won't come out and say it :) 
Anonymous
September 7, 2011 7:19:38 PM

@julius 85

H264......
September 7, 2011 7:21:08 PM

julius 85Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?

When they are ripped from BluRay using x264 codec. Videos can be anywhere from 2gig up.
September 7, 2011 7:23:59 PM

hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.


A Blu-Ray copy can be as much as 20+GB. You can compress the hell out of it and get it below 2GB. Maybe most people won't notice the difference on a (up to) 36" TV, but for some of use, we enjoy quality and do as little compression as possible. I make ISOs out of my DVDs, and haven't really found a solution I like for HD content, so I just use the discs.

Maybe the introduction of this 4TB drives will allow me to build that 20TB NAS I have been thinking about without breaking the bank.
September 7, 2011 7:27:04 PM

hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

I wish I could sell my home-movies for 10 bux a pop...
Think: Uncompressed, 15 minute long, videos of your kids lifetime accomplishments, like 1st steps and Bar Mitzvah...
September 7, 2011 7:37:55 PM

NEVER use a big HDD. Best is to split into smaller ones, preferrably with backups. I use a 500GB drive in my PC, and it only has installed programs and games on it - the movies/photos/music are on the external drives. (That way I also won't ever need any "cloud"... because my drives can be connected to any of my PCs, lol)

Plus 4 TB would be a pain in the neck to fill up even with USB 3.0... and I don't even have 1 TB of data! :D 
September 7, 2011 7:38:53 PM

jacobdrjI wish I could sell my home-movies for 10 bux a pop...Think: Uncompressed, 15 minute long, videos of your kids lifetime accomplishments, like 1st steps and Bar Mitzvah...

A change in material focus and a 18+ age requirement would probably net you home movies worth $10 or more.
September 7, 2011 7:41:54 PM

I could get four x 2TB (= 8 TB) Samsung Spinpoint drives for the price of this seagate 4TB drive.

that's 4 Terabytes free! does anyone know what that means?
Anonymous
September 7, 2011 7:46:29 PM

@noblerabbit

The MPIAA, RIAA and Comcast would like a chat with you ?
September 7, 2011 7:52:09 PM

You know what's annoying? Measuring a measurable amount using an arbitrary unit. I could make tons of 1-second-long HD movies and that would skyrocket the count. I could also take very long HD movies and that would plummet the count. Same goes for photos, mp3's, etc.
Just say 4 TB and leave it at that...
September 7, 2011 8:05:19 PM

Just give us decently priced NAS supporting RAID5 and let us use whatever size HDD we want ...
Anonymous
September 7, 2011 8:16:12 PM

@amk-aka-phantom huh what? should I be scurred? I just fired up a dell R510 I picked up from ebay with 2x 146GB 15k cheetahs for boot and packed it with 12x2tb SATAs for storage in Raid6 for my home media server that will live in the garage. I also have a cheap little eSATA 4 bay enclosure with 4 x 2TB in a software raid 5 that has been running for about 2 years without a hitch, although it's getting close to full.

If you could attain USB 3 speeds, and not be bottle necked by the controller USB3 should, in theory, outperformance 3Gb/s SATA, but not quite up to 6Gb/s SATA. I have a kingston thumb drive that does 125MB/s in both directions which out be perfectly fine if this drive could match that.

Personally I like single platter drives for data due to less heat, quieter, and generally higher MTBF, but I usually go for what is big and cheap and raid it. What you said about never use a big HDD is just silly. I have a box at work with about 200 8-20GB drives in there that eventually I'm supposed to break out the drill and destroy, do you want them instead?

As far as this thing? Meh, I'll wait for 4TB internals. hmm 12x4TB in my R510 would be me enough room for over 1000 Blu-ray images assuming 40GB each, although across my current 250ish blu-ray images they are average out to about 25-30GB. WOohooo! hurry up 4TB internals.
September 7, 2011 8:41:35 PM

Quote:
the 4 TB external drive will come pre-loaded with backup software (with 192-bit Triple DES encryption)


Triple DES is nothing more three applications of 56-bit DES (for a total of 168-bits in the keyspace). DES is EXTREMELY slow, I would never use it to encrypt 4TB of data. With Intel's recent addition of native instructions for AES, it would seem to be the only logical cipher to choose for this application.
September 7, 2011 8:44:29 PM

I got a 3 TB external for ~$120 earlier this year. I don't remember the exact price, but two of those is still cheaper than this. You pay a steep premium for the highest-density drives and unless you really need that right now, it is never worth it. These things lose value like discrete GPUs, only worse. No thanks.
September 7, 2011 9:15:36 PM

I'm glad that there is finally a 4TB drive, now just wait until 4TB bare drives are available, then wait about a year for them to come down to about $100-125 and I might buy then.

I currently have 6 2TB drives and 1 1TB drive on my PC and they are all with "breathing problems". (FULL)

So obviously I would like to get my hands on 6 of this drives when the price is right. (it will be soon enough)
September 7, 2011 9:24:49 PM

They'll be a lot of porno addicts happy about seeing this I suspect.
September 7, 2011 9:26:36 PM

Plus the ones that mention that they like this new seagate idea coming into play soon.
September 7, 2011 10:14:24 PM

hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

lol that was exactly my first thought.
My average HD movie is probably around 8GB.
September 7, 2011 10:48:04 PM

2-year warranty? Not interested at all!
September 7, 2011 10:49:09 PM

so in rough numbers:

In 1990 we had 20 Megabyte harddisks
In 2000 we had 20 Gigabyte harddisks
In 2011 we are approaching 20 Petabyte harddisks

I guess in ten years we have 20 Terrabyte harddisks

Seems unreal, but almost certainly bound to happen!
September 7, 2011 11:08:34 PM

xyz001so in rough numbers:In 1990 we had 20 Megabyte harddisksIn 2000 we had 20 Gigabyte harddisksIn 2011 we are approaching 20 Petabyte harddisksI guess in ten years we have 20 Terrabyte harddisksSeems unreal, but almost certainly bound to happen!


20 Petabyte's now? I wish..

Someone got mixed up.. :) 
September 7, 2011 11:08:36 PM

Quote:
so in rough numbers:

In 1990 we had 20 Megabyte harddisks
In 2000 we had 20 Gigabyte harddisks
In 2011 we are approaching 20 Petabyte harddisks...

Umm, no. No one has a Petabyte HD for sale. NAS yes (200PB, from IBM) but not a single disk. I’m sure you mixed that up but even so in 10 years we’ll be lucky to have a 1PB (1000TB) drive.
September 7, 2011 11:10:47 PM

I just wish they would stop overstating the HD capacity. It’s getting a little ridicules at these drive sizes. Every OS I’ve used over the last 25 years says 1024KB = 1MB of RAM or HD space not 1000KB! When I buy 8GB of RAM I get 8192MB of RAM.
So now you fire up and format your new 4TB HD and you get 3.6-ish TB not 4TB! They need to be forced to use a different nomenclature.
September 7, 2011 11:13:12 PM

i gotta say, that's a lot of pr0n on one drive :p 
September 8, 2011 12:04:52 AM

xyz001so in rough numbers:In 1990 we had 20 Megabyte harddisksIn 2000 we had 20 Gigabyte harddisksIn 2011 we are approaching 20 Petabyte harddisksI guess in ten years we have 20 Terrabyte harddisksSeems unreal, but almost certainly bound to happen!


Well sir it seems you skipped terabytes. 1 gb is 1000 mb. 1 tb is 1000 gb.
Following the trend, we should have a 20 terabyte hd by now. How did u get 20 Pb?
Anonymous
September 8, 2011 12:36:45 AM

Tanquen, this has been discussed before and the IEEE agreed that Mega, Giga, and Tera (and Peta, etc.) are decimal magnitudes. Mega is 10^6, Giga is 10^9, and Tera is 10^12. Mebi, Gibi, and Tebi are binary magnitudes. So you have 8 Gibibytes of ram, but 4 Terabytes (3.6ish Tebibytes) of HDD space.
September 8, 2011 12:43:08 AM

I wish more manufacturers would focus on speed of hdd compared to the storage.
September 8, 2011 2:33:00 AM

julius 85Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?

Yeah, i'd say a full-length movie can't be considered HD unless it is at least 8GB in size with h.264 encoding, otherwise compression reduces quality too much!
September 8, 2011 2:37:27 AM

TanquenI just wish they would stop overstating the HD capacity. It’s getting a little ridicules at these drive sizes. Every OS I’ve used over the last 25 years says 1024KB = 1MB of RAM or HD space not 1000KB! When I buy 8GB of RAM I get 8192MB of RAM.So now you fire up and format your new 4TB HD and you get 3.6-ish TB not 4TB! They need to be forced to use a different nomenclature.


NO NO NO!! The hard drive manufactures are NOT lying to us, this drive indeed has 4TB (Terabytes) of capacity, but only 3.64TiB (Tebibytes). Your computer will see 3.64TiB as the capacity.
I don't why people don't get this yet. The manufactures are stating the true capacity, but they happen to say it in the base 10 system!
September 8, 2011 2:45:33 AM

Seagate has a history of making cheap drives with a low mtbf. It's how they drop the prices so low for their products. That's an undeniable fact.

4TB is seriously not going to last long unless seagate has figured out how to fit it into 2 platters.
September 8, 2011 3:17:02 AM

johnsmithhatesVLCSeagate has a history of making cheap drives with a low mtbf. It's how they drop the prices so low for their products. That's an undeniable fact. 4TB is seriously not going to last long unless seagate has figured out how to fit it into 2 platters.

That is what I hear, but at the same time I have always bought seagate, and I have never lost one due to manufacturing defect. I did loose 2 from faulty power issues (which also took out the last of my maxtor crap), and I did get one that refuses to recognize more than 120GB of a 250GB drive, but that one was 'rescued' from a dumpster and I dont know if it shipped that way.
I still use a 8 year old 80GB drive as a system drive in my backup/testing machine, old slow and noisy, but still works as well as when I bought it!
Anonymous
September 8, 2011 3:25:53 AM

looks like its nearly time to upgrade my 16-bay Fibre-Channel SAN drives,even split into multiple RAID 5s, that's over 50TBs of space....woohoo!!!!
Anonymous
September 8, 2011 5:35:42 AM

So will WD sue them over the book look?
September 8, 2011 6:13:35 AM

NightLight said:
i gotta say, that's a lot of pr0n on one drive :p 

Right on! Nightlight,Right on! You got that right a real lot of porn! :sol: 
September 8, 2011 6:16:30 AM

Wish I Was Wealthy said:
They'll be a lot of porno addicts happy about seeing this I suspect.

Yeah Wish I Was Wealthy! You got that right! Spot on man! :sol: 
September 8, 2011 6:19:18 AM

While I appreciate the capacity race, it's a Seagate...and that ruins it for me.
September 8, 2011 10:26:54 AM

danwat1234NO NO NO!! The hard drive manufactures are NOT lying to us, this drive indeed has 4TB (Terabytes) of capacity, but only 3.64TiB (Tebibytes). Your computer will see 3.64TiB as the capacity.I don't why people don't get this yet. The manufactures are stating the true capacity, but they happen to say it in the base 10 system!

4,000,000,000,000 bytes
4 trillion bytes
4 terabytes

Argue about dividing it up in iterations of 1024 all day, but that's how they work it out.
September 8, 2011 12:40:07 PM

julius 85Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?


That's what I was thinking. Mine are all 8gb to 15gb, which is 266 to 500 movies.
September 8, 2011 1:17:05 PM

Awesome! A new Seagate drive that can take 4TB of valuable data with it when it crashes after 3 months (hey, it IS a Seagate after all).
September 8, 2011 1:29:20 PM

noblerabbitI could get four x 2TB (= 8 TB) Samsung Spinpoint drives for the price of this seagate 4TB drive.that's 4 Terabytes free! does anyone know what that means?


It means that your using 4 power cables, and 4 of your 6? or 8? SATA Ports on your motherboard, Now dont use cost as the deciding factor and how much data could you store using those same 4 ports with 4th drives? to a lot of people, that extra 8tb is worth it! + now maybe this will drive the price of your 2, 3TB discs down further
September 8, 2011 1:31:38 PM

MMXMonsterWhen they are ripped from BluRay using x264 codec. Videos can be anywhere from 2gig up.

Well, I meant films.
September 8, 2011 3:30:59 PM

"Seagate has a history of making cheap drives with a low mtbf. "

Maybe recent history? Check out how many 15-20 year old functional Seagate SCSI drives are on eBay and selling for ~$5-20+ per GB!

Right now I see,
ST52160N, 2GB, $132 [$66/GB]
ST32151N, 2GB, $95 [$47]
ST51080N, 1GB, $45 [$45]
ST34520N, 4GB, $175 [$44]
ST34520N, 4GB, $150 [$37]
ST32272N, 2GB, $72 [$36]
ST51080N, 1GB, $35 [$35]
ST31051N, 1GB, $33 [$33]
ST32272N, 2GB, $65 [$32]
ST34520N, 4GB, $119 [$30]
ST39140N, 9GB, $190 [$21]
ST32550N, 2GB, $30 [$15]

These aren't listed prices from crazy sellers, these are SOLD items. Seagate must have been doing something right in the past when their USED drives from the 90s are are still selling for the kinds of prices that brand new drives sell for now that have 1000x the capacity [and are much faster, I think these 50-pin SCSI drives top out at ~10 MB/s].
September 8, 2011 3:39:48 PM

elitemarksmanTanquen, this has been discussed before and the IEEE agreed that Mega, Giga, and Tera (and Peta, etc.) are decimal magnitudes. Mega is 10^6, Giga is 10^9, and Tera is 10^12. Mebi, Gibi, and Tebi are binary magnitudes. So you have 8 Gibibytes of ram, but 4 Terabytes (3.6ish Tebibytes) of HDD space.


That is not quite right but why do you think they did that anyway? Manufactures and venders with influence over IEC and SI standers decided that GB is no longer 1073741824 bytes its 100000000 bytes and that the GB that everyone is using and is used to as 1073741824 bytes is not really GB it’s GiB. So they can continue to use misleading numbers when advertising the drive size. It’s funny that none of the operating systems have changed. Maybe that’s because it’s total BS and makes no sense to base some of your computer on one sizing convention and part on another. Hey dad, when I move this file from RAM (data storage) to HD (still data storage) the file size increase. Well son that’s because it not a GiB any more, now it’s a GB. Give me a break! The drive manufactures are the ones that should be using GiB and TiB when lying about their drive sizes. Even then it’s still misleading and everyone that reads up on this knows exactly why they are doing it. It makes their drives sound bigger.
September 8, 2011 3:43:53 PM

danwat1234NO NO NO!! The hard drive manufactures are NOT lying to us, this drive indeed has 4TB (Terabytes) of capacity, but only 3.64TiB (Tebibytes). Your computer will see 3.64TiB as the capacity.I don't why people don't get this yet. The manufactures are stating the true capacity, but they happen to say it in the base 10 system!


Yes (I think) they are. See post above.
September 8, 2011 3:48:22 PM

Not sure if it is the case anymore-- been a long time since I bought a retail packaged HDD, but back in the good old days, it was usually printed on the box stating something like 'the actual capacity of this 80MB hard drive is 80 million bytes, not 83,886,080 bytes'...
!