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Nvidia CEO: No Mobile Strategy Means "Deep Turd"

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  • Mobile
  • Processors
  • Nvidia
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September 8, 2011 10:30:03 AM

Nvidia's CEO this week talked about the company's primary focus on its Tegra processor and the mobile sector, and said that companies without a mobile strategy are in "deep turd." Mmm tasty.

Nvidia CEO: No Mobile Strategy Means "Deep Turd" : Read more

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September 8, 2011 10:51:41 AM

When I see quotes from this CEO I always get the feeling that he's a complete idiot.. Probably not but still..

On topic, I believe that since the mobile sector is getting more and more saturated it would be wiser for AMD and Intel to do just what they seem to be doing: Optimize their current line of cpus towards better architecture and power efficiency and creep down safely into the mobile world. That way they'll be less threatened by arm when they go up to the more performance-oriented server and consumer market and lay stronger foundations on their entire business.

The fact that you're first into something doesn't mean you're better.
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September 8, 2011 10:52:33 AM

Intel's process technology may eventually make x86 viable in mobile devices, but it's questionable whether its performance superiority will ever matter enough to make it necessary. Intel can obviously beat Arm clock for clock, but at what power cost?

Just because you can make a working x86 phone or tablet doesn't mean it will run as cool or as long as an arm device, and the average user cares a lot more about that than the internals of these sorts of devices.
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September 8, 2011 11:11:03 AM

Absolutely true doron, but all those ABs playing idiots just don't understand what the word 'performance' actually means.
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Anonymous
September 8, 2011 11:21:46 AM

It's quite dangerous to underestimate a potential competitor 1000 times as rich as Nvidia is. If Intel wants to be relevant in the mobile sector I don't see what will be in their path - certainly not nvidia which it could purchase any day btw.
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September 8, 2011 11:29:07 AM

Thunderfoxthe average user cares a lot more about that than the internals of these sorts of devices.

Are you sure about that? Last time I looked everyone seemed to have been fairly busy playing 'Angry Birds' on their 3 hour lasting smartphones rather than playing 'Snake' on an old Nokia that lasted for days or even weeks.

It's all about the latest gimic with mobile phones and always have been which is why they took off with the 'Yuppies' of the eighties in the first place. They didn't need them but they thought it made them 'look good'... Even Del Boy got one.
If the latest and great gimics can run on x86 and ARM can't keep up, the market will switch once again. It is a fickle beast after all...
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September 8, 2011 11:44:18 AM

nVidia needs the mobile market seeing as it has lost the console market totally, AMD have dominated there and will continue to do so.
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Anonymous
September 8, 2011 12:51:06 PM

I don't see why people think these numbers mean the death of the desktop. Desktops are fairly ubiquitous in the US now, so it's not like they have much expansion left there. The mobile market is developing so fast they can milk money out of that for a while. Just because one market can expand does not mean other markets will die...
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September 8, 2011 12:52:18 PM

"They're speaking the wrong language," he said. "We're not worried about them at all."
- But you're moving slow, isn't it?
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September 8, 2011 1:08:07 PM

In other news, Steve Balmer today said that anyone who doesn't like Windows 7 is "a total duty-head poo-poo face".
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September 8, 2011 1:10:32 PM

In the word of Beavis and Butthead "heh heh hehhehe He said turd hehheh hehheh hehheh"
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September 8, 2011 1:11:35 PM

ThunderfoxIntel's process technology may eventually make x86 viable in mobile devices, but it's questionable whether its performance superiority will ever matter enough to make it necessary. Intel can obviously beat Arm clock for clock, but at what power cost? Just because you can make a working x86 phone or tablet doesn't mean it will run as cool or as long as an arm device, and the average user cares a lot more about that than the internals of these sorts of devices.


by the time that we have an x86 viable phone, batteries to support a day or so full use will be around, remember, tech uses power, but batteries also get more powerfull as time gos on.
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September 8, 2011 1:18:27 PM

For every smartphone and tablet, you will typically need a PC to sync your new content or do updates.

Sure you can download music, TV shows and movies over the air, but that will kill your data plan.

Also you will have a copy of all your content on your PC hard drives, anyone that stores their entire music collection on a single device that can be dropped in a toilet or be stolen must be the stupidest person EVAR!

Cloud storage? Err, please refer to data plan being rinsed again.
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September 8, 2011 1:27:38 PM

alidanby the time that we have an x86 viable phone, batteries to support a day or so full use will be around, remember, tech uses power, but batteries also get more powerfull as time gos on.


You can have the best batteries in the world, but if a processor dissipates 125w (or even 25w) of power as heat then it's not going to be very useful in a phone.
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September 8, 2011 1:45:12 PM

ArcheanAbsolutely true doron, but all those ABs playing idiots just don't understand what the word 'performance' actually means.


I agree, but just in case they do, or in case Intel proves to be a viable player in the mobile sector and beats Nvidia in both marketing (gonna be hard but if someone can do it, it's Intel) and process technology, then since Nvidia so eagerly rushed towards where the "money" is, we can already see the effects of all the resources nvidia throws on mobile chip development at the expense of graphics card development and performance per dollar. They will probably have nowhere to return.
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September 8, 2011 2:14:15 PM

The mobile sector is all well and good, but I certainly believe we're going to see a point in the next year or two where the entire industry hits a major wall. The technology will either stop evolving meaningfully, or the consumer base will reach a sort of soft cap when everyone who wants a smartphone or a tablet will more or less have one. There will still be growth, but nothing like the unchecked growth we've seen up until this point.

At least with PC hobbyists, you have a reasonably predictable base. Some will upgrade yearly (or more) and most will upgrade at least every other year. And now that we're seeing entry level CPUs with integrated GPUs capabable of something even resembling gaming, I would imagine that you're going to see a new influx of players into the market. They'll get the first taste with something low-cost, then upgrade from there.
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September 8, 2011 6:34:47 PM

ZingamSmartphones and tablets have 2 years lifespan while you could use your latop for 5 years straight and your desktop even much longer. Especially now when CPUs are so powerful and if you do not listen to Microsoft and do not upgrade each time when a new Windows comes out, you could use your PC for 7-8 years.Smartphones just get destroyed within 2 years and most break within that time.


It's fair to say that about smartphones, but the longevity of tablets is still in question. They simply haven't been part of mainstream consumer electronics long enough to establish a good sense of their usable lifespan.

With smartphones, however, I'm curious how many people replace a broken smartphone with another smartphone. Assuming it's outside of any sort of warranty, most consumers with major US cellular plans would have to pay 100% out-of-pocket for a new phone before their contract expires, so I can certainly see many opting for a cheaper phone in the interim.
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September 8, 2011 7:12:40 PM

People are always quick to question "does xx mean the death of yy".

But just as Kevin pointed out, the proliferation of quality point-and-shoot and camera sensors in mobile phones didn't kill the dSLR market. Indeed no two industry is alike, but just because more people have mobile devices does not mean they'll abandon the desktop entirely.

In that said mobile industry, nvidia has been doing quite well in my opinion. They have managed to develop Tegra, a brilliant piece of work that really pushed smartphones further.
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September 8, 2011 8:14:18 PM

lazymangakaThe mobile sector is all well and good, but I certainly believe we're going to see a point in the next year or two where the entire industry hits a major wall. The technology will either stop evolving meaningfully, or the consumer base will reach a sort of soft cap when everyone who wants a smartphone or a tablet will more or less have one. There will still be growth, but nothing like the unchecked growth we've seen up until this point. At least with PC hobbyists, you have a reasonably predictable base. Some will upgrade yearly (or more) and most will upgrade at least every other year. And now that we're seeing entry level CPUs with integrated GPUs capabable of something even resembling gaming, I would imagine that you're going to see a new influx of players into the market. They'll get the first taste with something low-cost, then upgrade from there.


Read the prologue to John Michael Crichton's (Michael Crichton) book "Timeline" in which he talks about how scientists once thought they knew almost everything they would ever really know and then it was discovered that the world was round. He goes on to list things like the electron microscope that then took us into a much better understanding of the human body and changed medicine forever. He then ends his thoughts with the idea that once again we are on a brink of thinking we know a lot, and how science is developing faster and faster still - who knows what we will discover next? I for one, still have a hard time having conversations on my HTC 4G LTE cellular phone. The sound quality/microphone both suck. People foresee walls all the time, but the beauty of human ingenuity means that we can travel to the moon and beyond.
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September 8, 2011 8:14:57 PM

I'd like to know what AMD's take is on NVIDIA not producing chipsets that aren't wholy defective.

NVIDIA is one of the solely responsible parties of all of the HP DV#000 and DV# systems having boards that crapped out en masse in the last few years.

This is why Intel didn't want NVIDIA making chipsets for their platform anymore, and why NVIDIA now only licenses the technology. It's also one of the reasons why HP is getting out the PC business. I don't see any DV6000 systems that still work anymore. The problem is probably just as, if not more, severe than "Capacitor-gate" of the first half of the last decade.
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September 8, 2011 8:16:51 PM

If the USAF made press statements like the CEO of NVidia I'd have to considering going AWOL. "Turd"? I'm sorry, I graduated kindergarten. Can you speak my "adult" language? Thanks.
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September 8, 2011 9:53:58 PM

I am so sick and tired about every other technology news article asking/saying that the PC is going to die... I almost wish it will so we can get over this.
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September 9, 2011 4:32:37 AM

It's pretty obvious he was thinking the word "sh1t". Maybe saying turd doesn't violate his religious beliefs, or perhaps he is under contract to represent the company a certain way. Whenever I see quotes like that, my adult brain replaces the word with the "proper" term that fits my lifestyle.

lol... moving on....

Tablet software... is it going to get much more complicated? I don't think you can develop the software further without also completely changing the methods to interface with it. It might be that the two go together so we may not see any real need to abandon dual-core tablets for quad-cores unless its reached EOL or dies. I think you all get what I mean. If the interface doesn't change or evolve much, then the software won't get too far ahead of it, where we feel a given tablet is too slow.
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