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HP Pavilion DM1 Now Just $399, Sports AMD E-series

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September 9, 2011 11:16:37 AM

The only good thing about HP is the feature. Price and reliability needs to improve.
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September 9, 2011 11:37:01 AM

... AMD FTW!!! The CPU side is maybe not the best, but in GPU department... the APU rock's... and the APP/GPGPU/DX11/OpenCL side... the AMD's APU is more futureproof...
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Anonymous
September 9, 2011 12:24:09 PM

There is no such thing as futureproof in computerland ;) 
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September 9, 2011 12:57:14 PM

Cambion DaystarThere is no such thing as futureproof in computerland

... you right... but this kind of tech extend the lifespan a bit...
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September 9, 2011 1:22:52 PM

Hmmm I think I could stick one of these in the lounge as a cheap HTPC :D 
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September 9, 2011 2:57:33 PM

where is the Sabine platform?
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September 9, 2011 3:35:09 PM

I'm going to be recommending this to basically everyone I know who's looking for a small laptop. Looks like HP hit it right on the head with this one.
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September 9, 2011 8:08:18 PM

Unless HP bothers to actually use DDR3-1600 DIMMs in the E-450 model (to take advantage of its increased bandwidth over the E-350 it replaced), the system won't perform any better than any E-350 model presently on the market. With the memory prices continuing to fall, there's absolutely no reason they shouldn't take advantage of the E-450's one shining quality - increased memory bandwidth offering an additional increase in graphics performance.
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September 9, 2011 10:06:46 PM

^ Agreed. Proper RAM and a 120GB SSD would make for a tempting netbook-sized device for mild gaming. I'm intrigued...
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September 9, 2011 11:09:04 PM

Any idea how the graphics performance would stack up between an E-450 and a core i3? I'd tempted to wait for the latter if it would provide much more grunt.
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Anonymous
September 10, 2011 12:19:18 AM

^ The graphics performance of the E-450 is defiantly better, but obviously neither will be great.

The greater performance of the i3 wont be shown that much due to the limitations of the graphics chip, but overall the i3 CPU would be better.
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September 10, 2011 2:25:25 AM

Quote:
^ The graphics performance of the E-450 is defiantly better, but obviously neither will be great.

The greater performance of the i3 wont be shown that much due to the limitations of the graphics chip, but overall the i3 CPU would be better.

The word you were looking for is definitely.
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Anonymous
September 10, 2011 2:39:33 AM

I thought HP was getting out of the hardware business...?
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September 10, 2011 3:46:06 AM

Yeah! That will make HP's gear real el cheapo using AMD-E series. Let's hope that they don't use the seconds of these AMD-E series chips or worse.
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September 10, 2011 3:47:42 AM

Yeah "rocky1138" they should get out of the hardware business,shouldn't they.
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September 10, 2011 6:20:09 AM

The new lower price tag and updated hardware is nice. The software, not so much. It'll be wiped away if I was to get my hands on it anyway.
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September 11, 2011 4:26:11 PM

RazberyBanditUnless HP bothers to actually use DDR3-1600 DIMMs in the E-450 model (to take advantage of its increased bandwidth over the E-350 it replaced), the system won't perform any better than any E-350 model presently on the market. With the memory prices continuing to fall, there's absolutely no reason they shouldn't take advantage of the E-450's one shining quality - increased memory bandwidth offering an additional increase in graphics performance.


I'll have to look this up; is the E-450's IMC a slight upgrade over the E-350? Since it's 1.65GHz and the E-350 is 1.6GHz, I figured it just uses a 16.5x multiplier instead of the 16x that the E-350 uses. I thought either chip could only really take advantage of DDR3-1333 though? I mean, I see E-350 mobos that have DDR3-1600 support, but haven't seen any benchmarks or articles on whether this offers a tangible benefit. I'll try and look for some now that you mention there's an advantage as it would be good information to have, but if you're thinking of a certain article would you mind posting a linky? :D  thanks!
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September 12, 2011 9:41:41 AM

decembermouse said:
I'll have to look this up; is the E-450's IMC a slight upgrade over the E-350? Since it's 1.65GHz and the E-350 is 1.6GHz, I figured it just uses a 16.5x multiplier instead of the 16x that the E-350 uses. I thought either chip could only really take advantage of DDR3-1333 though? I mean, I see E-350 mobos that have DDR3-1600 support, but haven't seen any benchmarks or articles on whether this offers a tangible benefit. I'll try and look for some now that you mention there's an advantage as it would be good information to have, but if you're thinking of a certain article would you mind posting a linky? :D  thanks!

Anand did a Brazos update article a few months back which included a preview of the E-450. link

As for why Brazos boards can support DDR3-1600, it's become perfectly normal for the board itself to support faster RAM than a CPU's (or APU's) internal memory controller is capable of supporting. As an example, any memory speed above DDR3-1600 (for many current CPUs/APUs, any speed above 1066 or 1333) can only be achieved via overclocking, but many DDR3 boards claim support up DDR3-2133 speeds.

And yeah, the E-450 is a slight upgrade over the E-350, but not by much based on clock rate(s) alone. The 50 MHz CPU clock rate boost is rather paltry, but it's something. The GPU got also got a little boost to 508 MHz. (This is up from the E-350's 492 MHz GPU clock, and it can OC itself to 600 MHz in some instances.) The real advantage the 450 offers is it's increased memory bandwidth through DDR3-1600 use, which should increase performance within more memory intensive programs (audio/video editing & compression), as well as overall 3D performance (since the GPU uses system memory). (I wish more notebook makers would actually use the A6-3410MX, A8-3510MX, and A8-3530MX with their similar DDR3-1600 support for the same reasons.)

What I don't understand is the current pricing of machines using the E-450. No matter where I look, they're all in the $500+ range, which easily enters A6-3400M Llano territory. Sure, the E-450 uses far less power and you might not need the A6's quad-cores, but if 3- to 5-hours of battery life is enough and you're looking for something that you can game on occasionally, the A6 blows the E-450 away. So does the A4-3300, for that matter. This HP announcement that they're releasing one at $400 is a step in the right direction towards more affordable low-power computing.
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