Is it my GeForce FX5700LE playing up or my monitor?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen shrinks
sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static
electricity being discharged, but louder), there will be a very brief
flash across the screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be bowed,
as well : things are more squashed towards the middle than at the
outside edges, where they look almost normal. After a while, it will
suddenly open out again. I have been told that it could be either the
card or the monitor which is causing it, but no one has been able to
tell me how to find out which one is the culprit. The only suggestion
has been to replace one or the other and see if the problem persists.
This seems a bit drastic, especially as both are expensive items, and
it stands to reason that I shall replace the wrong one!

Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup
which may be able to help?

Many thanks
Kate
27 answers Last reply
More about geforce fx5700le playing monitor
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dame6h$hu$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen shrinks
    > sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static electricity
    > being discharged, but louder), there will be a very brief flash across the
    > screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be bowed, as well : things are
    > more squashed towards the middle than at the outside edges, where they
    > look almost normal. After a while, it will suddenly open out again. I
    > have been told that it could be either the card or the monitor which is
    > causing it, but no one has been able to tell me how to find out which one
    > is the culprit. The only suggestion has been to replace one or the other
    > and see if the problem persists. This seems a bit drastic, especially as
    > both are expensive items, and it stands to reason that I shall replace the
    > wrong one!
    >
    > Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    > faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup which
    > may be able to help?
    >
    > Many thanks
    > Kate

    It's the monitor. It's dying. Time to get a new one, since repairing it
    will probably cost more than a new one would, but you can look into that.

    If you can borrow one from a friend, you might try that, just to confirm it.
    But I have zero reason to believe it's not the monitor.


    RF.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    In article <dame6h$hu$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk>, "Kate"
    <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> says...
    > Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen shrinks
    > sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static
    > electricity being discharged, but louder), there will be a very brief
    > flash across the screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be bowed,
    > as well : things are more squashed towards the middle than at the
    > outside edges, where they look almost normal. After a while, it will
    > suddenly open out again. I have been told that it could be either the
    > card or the monitor which is causing it, but no one has been able to
    > tell me how to find out which one is the culprit. The only suggestion
    > has been to replace one or the other and see if the problem persists.
    > This seems a bit drastic, especially as both are expensive items, and
    > it stands to reason that I shall replace the wrong one!
    >
    > Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    > faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup
    > which may be able to help?
    >
    > Many thanks
    > Kate
    >
    >
    >

    You could try a lower refresh rate and see what happens. How old is
    your monitor and what make and model. Ditto video card. My money is on
    the monitor going bad.

    Bill
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Yes, you HAVE to try replacing one or the other to tell which is bad.
    Assuming you don't have a spare monitor laying around, I would recommend
    finding a computer store with a generous return policy and buy an
    appropriate video card to replace your current one. It's an easy
    installation. If the new video card does not fix the problem, then return
    the video card for a refund and buy a monitor from the store.

    --
    DaveW


    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dame6h$hu$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen shrinks
    > sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static electricity
    > being discharged, but louder), there will be a very brief flash across the
    > screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be bowed, as well : things are
    > more squashed towards the middle than at the outside edges, where they
    > look almost normal. After a while, it will suddenly open out again. I
    > have been told that it could be either the card or the monitor which is
    > causing it, but no one has been able to tell me how to find out which one
    > is the culprit. The only suggestion has been to replace one or the other
    > and see if the problem persists. This seems a bit drastic, especially as
    > both are expensive items, and it stands to reason that I shall replace the
    > wrong one!
    >
    > Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    > faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup which
    > may be able to help?
    >
    > Many thanks
    > Kate
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Bill" <spamtrap@tinlc.lumbercartel.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d38729d87ec3df298975d@news.supernews.com...
    > In article <dame6h$hu$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk>, "Kate"
    > <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> says...
    >> Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen
    >> shrinks
    >> sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static
    >> electricity being discharged, but louder), there will be a very
    >> brief
    >> flash across the screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be
    >> bowed,
    >> as well : things are more squashed towards the middle than at the
    >> outside edges, where they look almost normal. After a while, it
    >> will
    >> suddenly open out again. I have been told that it could be either
    >> the
    >> card or the monitor which is causing it, but no one has been able
    >> to
    >> tell me how to find out which one is the culprit. The only
    >> suggestion
    >> has been to replace one or the other and see if the problem
    >> persists.
    >> This seems a bit drastic, especially as both are expensive items,
    >> and
    >> it stands to reason that I shall replace the wrong one!
    >>
    >> Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    >> faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup
    >> which may be able to help?
    >>
    >> Many thanks
    >> Kate
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > You could try a lower refresh rate and see what happens. How old is
    > your monitor and what make and model. Ditto video card. My money is
    > on
    > the monitor going bad.
    >
    > Bill

    The monitor refresh rate is set at 85 Hz. I did try 75 Hz but it made
    no difference, although when I reset it to 85 Hz the problem went away
    for a few days. It is quite old, I suppose - bought in 1995 - and is
    an LG Flatron 795FT Plus. The video card is an nVidia GeForce
    FX5700LE and is only just a week or two over 1 year old.

    I had a new computer in June 2004 (the video card was new then), but I
    kept the old monitor. Before that, I was having similar problems with
    it, but it is only recently that they have recurred, so it does make
    me wonder if it is the card after all.

    The idea of borrowing another monitor is a good one, so I shall ask
    around. I really would hate to buy a new monitor and then find that I
    should have replaced the card. Would "card creep" cause this sort of
    thing, do you know?

    Thanks for the replies
    Kate
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:damn5a$1nn$1$830fa79d@news.demon.co.uk...
    > The monitor refresh rate is set at 85 Hz. I did try 75 Hz but it made no
    > difference, although when I reset it to 85 Hz the problem went away for a
    > few days. It is quite old, I suppose - bought in 1995 - and is an LG
    > Flatron 795FT Plus. The video card is an nVidia GeForce FX5700LE and is
    > only just a week or two over 1 year old.
    >
    > I had a new computer in June 2004 (the video card was new then), but I
    > kept the old monitor. Before that, I was having similar problems with it,
    > but it is only recently that they have recurred, so it does make me wonder
    > if it is the card after all.
    >
    > The idea of borrowing another monitor is a good one, so I shall ask
    > around. I really would hate to buy a new monitor and then find that I
    > should have replaced the card. Would "card creep" cause this sort of
    > thing, do you know?
    >
    > Thanks for the replies
    > Kate

    This problem points to circuitry within the monitor that's designed to
    control the size of the screen failing. Problems like these can be exactly
    like you describe, in terms of working fine for a bit, then going wonky
    again, until the parts finally fail completely. The 'clicking' you heard
    also points to it being a monitor problem. No videocard would produce a
    clicking sound, unless it actually explodes. :D

    RF.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    In article <damn5a$1nn$1$830fa79d@news.demon.co.uk>, "Kate"
    <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> says...
    >
    > "Bill" <spamtrap@tinlc.lumbercartel.com> wrote in message
    > news:MPG.1d38729d87ec3df298975d@news.supernews.com...
    >
    >
    <snip>
    > >>
    > >
    > > You could try a lower refresh rate and see what happens. How old is
    > > your monitor and what make and model. Ditto video card. My money is
    > > on
    > > the monitor going bad.
    > >
    > > Bill
    >
    > The monitor refresh rate is set at 85 Hz. I did try 75 Hz but it made
    > no difference, although when I reset it to 85 Hz the problem went away
    > for a few days. It is quite old, I suppose - bought in 1995 - and is
    > an LG Flatron 795FT Plus. The video card is an nVidia GeForce
    > FX5700LE and is only just a week or two over 1 year old.

    Ten year old monitor? Be grateful it's lasted this long.


    >
    > I had a new computer in June 2004 (the video card was new then), but I
    > kept the old monitor. Before that, I was having similar problems with
    > it, but it is only recently that they have recurred, so it does make
    > me wonder if it is the card after all.
    >
    > The idea of borrowing another monitor is a good one, so I shall ask
    > around. I really would hate to buy a new monitor and then find that I
    > should have replaced the card. Would "card creep" cause this sort of
    > thing, do you know?

    Doubt it. Check around for a monitor to borrow or buy cheap. Maybe
    even rent one.

    >
    > Thanks for the replies
    > Kate
    >
    >
    >

    Bill
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "RaceFace" <nospam@myplace.com> wrote in message
    news:hnCze.7251$mN.81368@news1.mts.net...
    >
    > "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:damn5a$1nn$1$830fa79d@news.demon.co.uk...
    >> The monitor refresh rate is set at 85 Hz. I did try 75 Hz but it
    >> made no difference, although when I reset it to 85 Hz the problem
    >> went away for a few days. It is quite old, I suppose - bought in
    >> 1995 - and is an LG Flatron 795FT Plus. The video card is an
    >> nVidia GeForce FX5700LE and is only just a week or two over 1 year
    >> old.
    >>
    >> I had a new computer in June 2004 (the video card was new then),
    >> but I kept the old monitor. Before that, I was having similar
    >> problems with it, but it is only recently that they have recurred,
    >> so it does make me wonder if it is the card after all.
    >>
    >> The idea of borrowing another monitor is a good one, so I shall ask
    >> around. I really would hate to buy a new monitor and then find
    >> that I should have replaced the card. Would "card creep" cause
    >> this sort of thing, do you know?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the replies
    >> Kate
    >
    > This problem points to circuitry within the monitor that's designed
    > to control the size of the screen failing. Problems like these can
    > be exactly like you describe, in terms of working fine for a bit,
    > then going wonky again, until the parts finally fail completely.
    > The 'clicking' you heard also points to it being a monitor problem.
    > No videocard would produce a clicking sound, unless it actually
    > explodes. :D
    >
    > RF.
    >
    I thought that if the card was playing up, it might be sending the
    wrong signals to the monitor. Still, I will try and borrow a monitor
    for a week or so to see what happens. If everything works OK, then I
    will have to decide what monitor to buy. There are so many to choose
    from!

    Thank you for your help.
    Kate
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    Kate wrote:
    > Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen shrinks
    > sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static
    > electricity being discharged, but louder), there will be a very brief
    > flash across the screen, and then it collapses. It seems to be bowed,
    > as well : things are more squashed towards the middle than at the
    > outside edges, where they look almost normal. After a while, it will
    > suddenly open out again. I have been told that it could be either the
    > card or the monitor which is causing it, but no one has been able to
    > tell me how to find out which one is the culprit. The only suggestion
    > has been to replace one or the other and see if the problem persists.
    > This seems a bit drastic, especially as both are expensive items, and
    > it stands to reason that I shall replace the wrong one!
    >
    > Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    > faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup
    > which may be able to help?

    It's highly unlikely that the video card could cause a display
    distortion like that - almost certainly the monitor.

    --
    Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
    Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:damv13$hbn$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk
    > "RaceFace" <nospam@myplace.com> wrote in message
    > news:hnCze.7251$mN.81368@news1.mts.net...
    >>
    >> "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:damn5a$1nn$1$830fa79d@news.demon.co.uk...
    >>> The monitor refresh rate is set at 85 Hz. I did try 75 Hz but it
    >>> made no difference, although when I reset it to 85 Hz the problem
    >>> went away for a few days. It is quite old, I suppose - bought in
    >>> 1995 - and is an LG Flatron 795FT Plus. The video card is an
    >>> nVidia GeForce FX5700LE and is only just a week or two over 1 year
    >>> old.
    >>>
    >>> I had a new computer in June 2004 (the video card was new then),
    >>> but I kept the old monitor. Before that, I was having similar
    >>> problems with it, but it is only recently that they have recurred,
    >>> so it does make me wonder if it is the card after all.
    >>>
    >>> The idea of borrowing another monitor is a good one, so I shall ask
    >>> around. I really would hate to buy a new monitor and then find
    >>> that I should have replaced the card. Would "card creep" cause
    >>> this sort of thing, do you know?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the replies
    >>> Kate
    >>
    >> This problem points to circuitry within the monitor that's designed
    >> to control the size of the screen failing. Problems like these can
    >> be exactly like you describe, in terms of working fine for a bit,
    >> then going wonky again, until the parts finally fail completely.
    >> The 'clicking' you heard also points to it being a monitor problem.
    >> No videocard would produce a clicking sound, unless it actually
    >> explodes. :D
    >>
    >> RF.
    >>
    > I thought that if the card was playing up, it might be sending the
    > wrong signals to the monitor. Still, I will try and borrow a monitor
    > for a week or so to see what happens. If everything works OK, then I
    > will have to decide what monitor to buy. There are so many to choose
    > from!
    >
    > Thank you for your help.
    > Kate

    Kate, in all my years of putering around, what you describe going on
    (clicks and screen scaling wrong) have only been the monitor going out.
    That same thing has happened with a few of them. You can try that
    monitor on another computer and a different monitor on your computer. I
    think you'll find the monitor still has the problem. As an OP says in
    this thread, the video card isn't going to make those noises. Nor, in
    my experience, will it "miss-sync" the signal to make the monitor do
    that. It's a chip that controls either the height or the width. You
    can have it repaired, but with the cost of decent CRT and even LCD
    monitors being so low these days, it's cheaper to replace it.
    McG.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Robert Hancock" <hancockr@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:LHFze.204200$El.31849@pd7tw1no...
    > Kate wrote:
    >> Now and again, for no apparent reason, my CRT monitor screen
    >> shrinks sideways. There will be a "tick" sound (rather like static
    >> electricity being discharged, but louder), there will be a very
    >> brief flash across the screen, and then it collapses. It seems to
    >> be bowed, as well : things are more squashed towards the middle
    >> than at the outside edges, where they look almost normal. After a
    >> while, it will suddenly open out again. I have been told that it
    >> could be either the card or the monitor which is causing it, but no
    >> one has been able to tell me how to find out which one is the
    >> culprit. The only suggestion has been to replace one or the other
    >> and see if the problem persists. This seems a bit drastic,
    >> especially as both are expensive items, and it stands to reason
    >> that I shall replace the wrong one!
    >>
    >> Can anyone suggest some tests I could carry out to see which one is
    >> faulty, please, or point me in the direction of another newsgroup
    >> which may be able to help?
    >
    > It's highly unlikely that the video card could cause a display
    > distortion like that - almost certainly the monitor.
    >
    > --
    > Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    > To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
    > Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/

    I managed to find the invoice for my monitor and it isn`t as old as I
    thought - bought in 1999. Since I my first post it hasn`t played up
    at all, so maybe I will keep it for a bit longer, but remain aware
    that it could expire at any time. In a way it is a pity it isn`t the
    video card that is faulty, as that is still under guarantee!

    Thanks for all the advice.
    Kate
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    In article <das8pt$6vk$1$830fa795@news.demon.co.uk>, "Kate"
    <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> says...
    >
    >
    <snip>
    > Any recommendations would be very
    > welcome.
    >
    > Kate
    >
    >
    >

    Took a quick look at what's being offered in U.K and it appears your
    s.o.l. for a crt of profesional graphics quality crt's. It appears
    Sony <and there by others that used their crts > has gone out of the
    CRT business. You'll need to scour Ebay or chose an LCD.

    Bill
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    news:onmAe.20966$eM6.18201@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    > | Since posting the above I have noticed something interesting. The
    > | screen had collapsed, so I tried restarting the computer. The
    > display
    > | was full-size until my desktop came up, when it collapsed again.
    > A
    > | few seconds later, it opened back out. Now, if it was
    > _definitely_
    > | the monitor at fault, surely the display would have been reduced
    > in
    > | size right from re-start, rather than when the video card driver
    > was
    > | loaded?
    >
    > _____
    >
    > The problem, without a doubt, is in your monitor. For a CRT
    > monitor, the horizontal sweep circuit provides the power to drive
    > the electron beam from side to side. The same circuit also develops
    > the high voltage (~15,000 -20,000 VDC) that accelerates the electron
    > beam toward the screen. This is a high power circuit, and the most
    > likely circuit to fail in a CRT monitor. Even dust collecting
    > around the high voltage circuitry can cause arcing and intermittent
    > failure (say, a click or pop and then the picture collapses. A
    > thorough internal cleaning might fix the problem, but don't try it
    > yourself.
    >
    > A Trinitron CRT is still the best choice for your stated uses. The
    > monitor does not need to be a Sony; many manufacturers use Trintron
    > CRTs in monitors. Viewsonic is a respected brand, and something
    > like a Viewsonic PerfectFlat A95f ( 19" ( 1600 X1200 @ 75 FPS, 1280
    > X 1024 @ 85 FPS, 1024 X 768 @ 100 FPS) with a Trinitron CRT costs
    > about $200 in the USA. That line of Viewsonic monitors have a lot
    > of settings to perfect the geometry.
    >
    > An LCD monitor will have perfect geometry, but the color rendition
    > will not be as good as a CRT monitor and the color and contrast will
    > change according to the viewing angle, even from one point to
    > another on the screen from the same viewing position. The new
    > monitor you choose should also come with color rendition files that
    > aid in matching printer, scanner, and printer matching.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >

    Pat : My OS is Windows XP Home. I tried reducing the video
    acceleration and then I reduced the refresh rate to 60Hz. The display
    opened up, but, of course, it does flicker rather disturbingly. I
    then experimented with different refresh rates; sometimes the
    distortion was worse, sometimes the same. I returned it to 60Hz and
    then pushed video acceleration back to `Full`. The display remained
    full-screen.

    I left it at 60Hz while typing the above and then re-set it to 85Hz.
    The display is still full-screen. Does that give any more clues as to
    what is going on? Sorry to keep hammering on about this, but I am
    finding the replies most interesting and informative.

    BTW, what is "fubar"?

    Phil : Cleaning the inside of the monitor might be worth trying.
    Thanks for the suggestion. In 6 years, I guess a fair amount of
    grunge could have been attracted to it. There might even be a spider
    or two in there!

    I had not realised that other monitor manufacturers used Trinitron
    CRTs, so shall do a Google using that alone. I would like a 19"
    screen (the one I have now is 17"), but CRTs are so bulky and my desk
    space is limited, so I shall probably have to stick with a 17".

    Bill : thanks for checking out the UK market for me. I shall
    definitely go with a CRT for my main display, but could I use a small
    TFT as my second monitor? The GeForce FX5700LE is a dual-head,
    although I only have the one monitor at the moment. Two CRTs would
    take up too much room (see above).

    Thanks again, everyone, for all your help and advice.
    Best wishes
    Kate
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dato70$d4d$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    > Phil : Cleaning the inside of the monitor might be worth trying.
    > Thanks for the suggestion. In 6 years, I guess a fair amount of
    > grunge could have been attracted to it. There might even be a spider
    > or two in there!
    >
    Kate,
    DON'T TRY TO CLEAN the inside of your monitor! Phil already warned you not
    to, but didn't elaborate on the reason. There are some EXTREMELY high
    voltages in there, EVEN WHEN DISCONNECTED FROM THE POWER! Unless you know
    exactly what you are doing, opening up a monitor can have quite literally
    lethal consequences! That's why Phil warned you not to do it.

    Steve.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "stevem" <nobody@home.com> wrote in message
    news:XMuAe.122567$Vo6.54620@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    > "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:dato70$d4d$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >>
    >> Phil : Cleaning the inside of the monitor might be worth trying.
    >> Thanks for the suggestion. In 6 years, I guess a fair amount of
    >> grunge could have been attracted to it. There might even be a
    >> spider
    >> or two in there!
    >>
    > Kate,
    > DON'T TRY TO CLEAN the inside of your monitor! Phil already warned
    > you not to, but didn't elaborate on the reason. There are some
    > EXTREMELY high voltages in there, EVEN WHEN DISCONNECTED FROM THE
    > POWER! Unless you know exactly what you are doing, opening up a
    > monitor can have quite literally lethal consequences! That's why
    > Phil warned you not to do it.
    >
    > Steve.
    Thank you for the warning, Steve, but I wouldn`t have attempted to do
    it myself. I have had two powerful electric shocks in the past and
    would not want to repeat them. Then, I was young and fit; today, the
    opposite... There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors
    (and TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power
    after they are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or
    something?

    Kate
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:datuu8$nh5$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Thank you for the warning, Steve, but I wouldn`t have attempted to do it
    > myself. I have had two powerful electric shocks in the past and would
    > not want to repeat them. Then, I was young and fit; today, the
    > opposite... There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors (and
    > TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power after they
    > are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or something?
    >
    > Kate
    >
    Sorry, Kate, I suspected you might be aware of the danger, but I thought it
    best to point it out anyway! The cause of the trouble is mainly some VERY
    large capacitors, and it takes ages for the charge to drain away. I've only
    ever opened a couple of monitors, but I refused to touch them until they'd
    been disconnected at least a week. Overkill, I know; our engineers did tell
    me once how long it actually takes, a matter of hours, I think, but I'm
    somewhat cowardly around these things!

    Regards,
    Steve.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    'Kate' wrote, in part:
    | There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors
    | (and TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power
    | after they are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or
    | something?

    _____

    CRT display devices have at least three particular dangers.
    The CRT is evacuated, and can implode violently if hit; the front is
    protected by safety glass, but the sides and particlarly the neck are
    vulnerable.
    The CRT phosphors are poisonous.
    The high voltage system has a capicator stack that holds a relativly low
    charge, but at a very high voltage, and capable of leaping an inch or more
    through the air (or in dust, as may be intermittently happening in your
    monitor.)

    The low voltage power supply (operating at line voltage, 220 in your case)
    also has capacitors that can store a charge; though the voltages are lower,
    the stored charge is higher than for the high voltage system.

    The shock potential is high, and at the least will be very unpleasant. Even
    more dangerous is the possibility of involuntarily hitting the CRT in
    response to the shock and causing an implosion and flying glass.

    For the above reasons, among others, CRT monitor cases are difficult to
    open, and have the warning lable outside.

    If you take the monitor to a shop, keep in mind that intermittent failure of
    components in the high voltage cirucuit may be the culprit, rather than dust
    collection. If this is the case, repair may not be economic, compared to
    replacement (repair could easily cost 50% as much as replacement.

    Go with the 19", even if you have to move your desk away from a wall to let
    the rear of the CRT monitor hang over the edge (that's what I do.)

    A final suggestion; the next time the 'pop' occurs, and the image collapses,
    bang smartly on the side of the monitor; really. The image may immediately
    return. Occasional banging may get you through the time necessary for
    replacement.

    Phil Weldon

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:datuu8$nh5$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    > "stevem" <nobody@home.com> wrote in message
    > news:XMuAe.122567$Vo6.54620@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >>
    >> "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:dato70$d4d$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >>>
    >>> Phil : Cleaning the inside of the monitor might be worth trying.
    >>> Thanks for the suggestion. In 6 years, I guess a fair amount of
    >>> grunge could have been attracted to it. There might even be a spider
    >>> or two in there!
    >>>
    >> Kate,
    >> DON'T TRY TO CLEAN the inside of your monitor! Phil already warned you
    >> not to, but didn't elaborate on the reason. There are some EXTREMELY high
    >> voltages in there, EVEN WHEN DISCONNECTED FROM THE POWER! Unless you know
    >> exactly what you are doing, opening up a monitor can have quite literally
    >> lethal consequences! That's why Phil warned you not to do it.
    >>
    >> Steve.
    > Thank you for the warning, Steve, but I wouldn`t have attempted to do it
    > myself. I have had two powerful electric shocks in the past and would
    > not want to repeat them. Then, I was young and fit; today, the
    > opposite... There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors (and
    > TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power after they
    > are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or something?
    >
    > Kate
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:20:37 +0100, "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote:


    >
    >BTW, what is "fubar"?
    >

    fubar = f***ed up beyond all repair. Could be fouled up, but I like the
    courser version. :) Originated in the military.

    --
    Pat
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    news:cSyAe.21234$eM6.18239@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    > | There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors
    > | (and TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power
    > | after they are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or
    > | something?
    >
    > _____
    >
    > CRT display devices have at least three particular dangers.
    > The CRT is evacuated, and can implode violently if hit; the front is
    > protected by safety glass, but the sides and particlarly the neck
    > are vulnerable.
    > The CRT phosphors are poisonous.
    > The high voltage system has a capicator stack that holds a relativly
    > low charge, but at a very high voltage, and capable of leaping an
    > inch or more through the air (or in dust, as may be intermittently
    > happening in your monitor.)
    >
    > The low voltage power supply (operating at line voltage, 220 in your
    > case) also has capacitors that can store a charge; though the
    > voltages are lower, the stored charge is higher than for the high
    > voltage system.
    >
    > The shock potential is high, and at the least will be very
    > unpleasant. Even more dangerous is the possibility of involuntarily
    > hitting the CRT in response to the shock and causing an implosion
    > and flying glass.
    >
    > For the above reasons, among others, CRT monitor cases are difficult
    > to open, and have the warning lable outside.
    >
    > If you take the monitor to a shop, keep in mind that intermittent
    > failure of components in the high voltage cirucuit may be the
    > culprit, rather than dust collection. If this is the case, repair
    > may not be economic, compared to replacement (repair could easily
    > cost 50% as much as replacement.
    >
    > Go with the 19", even if you have to move your desk away from a wall
    > to let the rear of the CRT monitor hang over the edge (that's what I
    > do.)
    >
    > A final suggestion; the next time the 'pop' occurs, and the image
    > collapses, bang smartly on the side of the monitor; really. The
    > image may immediately return. Occasional banging may get you
    > through the time necessary for replacement.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >
    Firstly, to Steve : it was very kind of you to think of my safety. To
    be frank, I used to be unstoppable when I had a screwdriver in my
    hand, but I have learned to be more cautious. Besides, these days the
    legend "No user-serviceable parts inside" most often appears on the
    back of appliances.

    Phil : that is fascinating stuff. As capacitors are so small, how can
    they pack such a punch? More importantly, if the monitor is arcing,
    is it a fire risk? I`ll give your suggestion of thumping the monitor
    a try next time the display collapses. If nothing else, it will help
    me to vent my displeasure!

    Regarding a 19" monitor, unfortunately my desk is built in and cannot
    be moved. How much deeper than a 17" would it be? If it is only 2",
    it would probably be OK.

    I realise that this thread has moved away from the subject of video
    cards, so I want to thank you all for your patience and for allowing
    me to digress.

    Kate
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dauru3$67h$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    > Phil : that is fascinating stuff. As capacitors are so small, how can
    > they pack such a punch? More importantly, if the monitor is arcing,
    > is it a fire risk? I`ll give your suggestion of thumping the monitor
    > a try next time the display collapses. If nothing else, it will help
    > me to vent my displeasure!

    Size doesn't matter. ;) At least not when it comes to electricity. While
    the capacitors inside a TV or monitor are a bit larger than the ones on your
    motherboard, they don't need to be very big to hold a charge. I don't think
    it's a fire risk unless you've got a pile of fabric or paper sitting on top
    of your monitor. If the dust inside the monitor ignited (about the only
    thing that's possibly flammable inside) it would burn off very quickly.

    > Regarding a 19" monitor, unfortunately my desk is built in and cannot
    > be moved. How much deeper than a 17" would it be? If it is only 2",
    > it would probably be OK.

    Browsing around at a few monitors, most 17" flat CRTs seem to be around
    14-15" deep. 19" ones seem to be around 17-18", so probably about 3" deeper
    than your current one.

    > I realise that this thread has moved away from the subject of video
    > cards, so I want to thank you all for your patience and for allowing
    > me to digress.
    >
    > Kate

    No problem. :D

    RF.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    'Kate' wrote, in part:
    | Phil : that is fascinating stuff. As capacitors are so small, how can
    | they pack such a punch? More importantly, if the monitor is arcing,
    | is it a fire risk? I`ll give your suggestion of thumping the monitor
    | a try next time the display collapses. If nothing else, it will help
    | me to vent my displeasure!
    |
    | Regarding a 19" monitor, unfortunately my desk is built in and cannot
    | be moved. How much deeper than a 17" would it be? If it is only 2",
    | it would probably be OK.

    _____

    #1. The capacitors used in electronic equipment hold a small amout of
    energy; the punch comes from the ability of capacitors to release energy
    very quickly.

    Excessive detail follows -
    The basic unit of Capacity is the farad, named after Michael Faraday. It
    represents the energy. This is a very large unit, and even the large
    capacitors found in desktop computer power supplies are less than 1/10
    farad. Such a capacitor, fully charged at, say. 12 volts, could deliver (for
    a 100,000 microfarad capacitor) ~ 144 Watt seconds (enough to keep a 155
    watt lamp lit for less than a second. Even a three cell flashlight can do
    that over 10 seconds. The difference is that the capacitor could deliver
    that energy in less than 1/1000 of a second, a flashlight could't deliver
    the energy in much less than 10 seconds. Skin resistance will block almost
    all of the energy from a 12 volt source, the same voltage delivered to
    internal body tissues will cause grave damage.

    The capacitor(s) in the high voltage section of a CRT device are charged to
    thousands of volts (mainly depending on the CRT size.) The CRT itself also
    functions as a capacitor, and since the insulation is a thick piece of
    glass, the charge can take a long time to decay. The capacitance is, as I
    remember, less than a millionth of a farad. The danger of shock increases
    because 20,000 volts is enough to overcome skin resistance and deliver
    energy in to body tissues. Also, at that voltage, body capacitance to
    ground (no direct connection) is enough to allow current to flow. While it
    is doubtfull that a shock from the high voltage capacitor(s) in a CRT
    monitor would be directly fatal (I'm still alive), there could be secondary,
    and fatal effects.

    #2. Thumping the monitor. If thumping brings temporary relief, it may not
    be diagnostic. The thumping may have either dislodged dust, or it could
    have shaken a component back into contact. You could try using a vacumn
    cleaner on your monitor from outside the case, both blowing and suctioning
    (with the monitor having been turned off for a few hours.) This might help
    if the dust is the problem. Unfortunately, the dust may be slightly greasy,
    and hard to dislodge. Another name for thumbing, is 'finding the kick
    plate'; the point a which you kick a piece of equipment in order to make it
    work properly (originated when computer equipement was the size of
    refrigerators.)

    #3. The 19" CRT monitor I'm using (Viewsonic A95f) to write this is 19.5
    inches deep, and an extra 4 inches is needed for the connecting cable to
    avoid stress on the cable (which will eventually destroy the cable.) The
    rear is 13.5 inches X 13.5 inches; knocking a hole in the wall to get more
    depth might be possible B>) Deeper monitor cases allow longer CRTs (usually
    measured by the angle made by the lines from each side of the screen to the
    neck.) Longer CRTs have better geometry, use less power, can have faster
    refresh rates, and geometry adjustments are easier to make. Very high end
    monitors use a microprocessor make relatively automatic adjustments (and
    there can be over fifty different adjustments for geometry correction.) But
    color and contrast for a CRT are much superior to current LCD screens.

    Phil Weldon


    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dauru3$67h$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    > "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    > news:cSyAe.21234$eM6.18239@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >> 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    >> | There is usually a warning label on the back of monitors
    >> | (and TVs) not to investigate inside, but why do they retain power
    >> | after they are disconnected? Is there a magneto in there, or
    >> | something?
    >>
    >> _____
    >>
    >> CRT display devices have at least three particular dangers.
    >> The CRT is evacuated, and can implode violently if hit; the front is
    >> protected by safety glass, but the sides and particlarly the neck
    >> are vulnerable.
    >> The CRT phosphors are poisonous.
    >> The high voltage system has a capicator stack that holds a relativly
    >> low charge, but at a very high voltage, and capable of leaping an
    >> inch or more through the air (or in dust, as may be intermittently
    >> happening in your monitor.)
    >>
    >> The low voltage power supply (operating at line voltage, 220 in your
    >> case) also has capacitors that can store a charge; though the
    >> voltages are lower, the stored charge is higher than for the high
    >> voltage system.
    >>
    >> The shock potential is high, and at the least will be very
    >> unpleasant. Even more dangerous is the possibility of involuntarily
    >> hitting the CRT in response to the shock and causing an implosion
    >> and flying glass.
    >>
    >> For the above reasons, among others, CRT monitor cases are difficult
    >> to open, and have the warning lable outside.
    >>
    >> If you take the monitor to a shop, keep in mind that intermittent
    >> failure of components in the high voltage cirucuit may be the
    >> culprit, rather than dust collection. If this is the case, repair
    >> may not be economic, compared to replacement (repair could easily
    >> cost 50% as much as replacement.
    >>
    >> Go with the 19", even if you have to move your desk away from a wall
    >> to let the rear of the CRT monitor hang over the edge (that's what I
    >> do.)
    >>
    >> A final suggestion; the next time the 'pop' occurs, and the image
    >> collapses, bang smartly on the side of the monitor; really. The
    >> image may immediately return. Occasional banging may get you
    >> through the time necessary for replacement.
    >>
    >> Phil Weldon
    >>
    > Firstly, to Steve : it was very kind of you to think of my safety. To
    > be frank, I used to be unstoppable when I had a screwdriver in my
    > hand, but I have learned to be more cautious. Besides, these days the
    > legend "No user-serviceable parts inside" most often appears on the
    > back of appliances.
    >
    > Phil : that is fascinating stuff. As capacitors are so small, how can
    > they pack such a punch? More importantly, if the monitor is arcing,
    > is it a fire risk? I`ll give your suggestion of thumping the monitor
    > a try next time the display collapses. If nothing else, it will help
    > me to vent my displeasure!
    >
    > Regarding a 19" monitor, unfortunately my desk is built in and cannot
    > be moved. How much deeper than a 17" would it be? If it is only 2",
    > it would probably be OK.
    >
    > I realise that this thread has moved away from the subject of video
    > cards, so I want to thank you all for your patience and for allowing
    > me to digress.
    >
    > Kate
    >
    >
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    news:cSyAe.21234$eM6.18239@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    Occasional banging may get you through the time necessary for
    > replacement.
    >

    Sounds like *somebody* is between marriages......
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Pat" <pk@primenet.com> wrote in message
    news:kcf6d15hob8t4rfpqg6a80nid8s4s5dtkm@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:20:37 +0100, "Kate"
    > <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>BTW, what is "fubar"?
    >>
    >
    > fubar = f***ed up beyond all repair. Could be fouled up, but I like
    > the courser version. :) Originated in the military.
    >
    > --
    > Pat

    I _thought_ it must be an industry term <grin> I must try and
    remember it.

    Thanks for the info on the size of 19" monitors, RF and Phil. It
    might be possible to squeeze one in if I re-arrange my desk.

    Re capacitors, when I think of the size of a 12V car battery and
    that something as small as a capacitor can store a much larger charge,
    I am amazed.

    Would using an aerosol can of air be safe for blowing through the
    vents in the monitor (after taking the necessary precautions, of
    course), or would it be too powerful? I don`t think I can reverse the
    suction on my vacuum cleaner.

    >Another name for thumping, is 'finding the kick plate'; the point at
    >which you kick a piece of equipment in order to make it work properly
    >(originated when computer equipement was the size of refrigerators.)

    I used to work for an oil company in the days before PCs. The
    Computer Room (note initial caps!) was cavernous and like an empty
    church : cool and very quiet, with just the hum of the gigantic
    mainframes working, and the hushed voices of the white-coated
    technicians who administered to these monoliths. I found it almost
    mesmeric watching the tape spools rotating back and forth. But now I
    know what those big red crosses on the cabinets were for ;-)

    Regards
    Kate
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    'Kaate' wrote, in part:
    | Re capacitors, when I think of the size of a 12V car battery and
    | that something as small as a capacitor can store a much larger charge,
    | I am amazed.

    _____

    No, no; the capacitors you find in most electronic devices hold much, much,
    much less energy than a car battery. It's just that what small amount of
    energy a capacitor does hold can be released much more quickly. A typical
    12 volt car battery might be rated at 60 ampere hours, (60 ampere hours X 12
    volts) = 720 watt hours, enough to run a refrigerator for an hour. It might
    require several minutes to deliver that power. A typical capacitor in a PC
    power supply might hold 120 watt seconds, only 0.002 % as much. However,
    new types of capacitors have been developed, low voltage capacitors with
    storage capacities measured in thousands of farads. Such capicators can be
    used to store starting power for large vehicles because the stored power can
    be delivered quickly from a relatively small volume; a smaller than usual
    ordinary battery supplies normal operating power. The weight of the
    combination is less than half that of the usual battery.

    Again, batteries and capacitors are similar in that they both store energy;
    batteries operate in the time range of seconds, minutes, hours, days -
    capacitors usually operate in the time range of picoseconds to milliseconds.
    Batteries store energy chemically, capacitors store energy as electrical
    charge. Though I guess a capacitor could operate with chemical storage,
    only slowly. In a power supply, a capicator can be though of as storing
    power during the high points of a rectified AC cycle and relasing that power
    during the low points (rectified Alternating Current is pulsating Direct
    Current.)

    The second computer room I worked in was very popular in the summer - it had
    the best air conditioning B^)

    Phil Weldon

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:db097f$ge1$1$830fa7a5@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    > "Pat" <pk@primenet.com> wrote in message
    > news:kcf6d15hob8t4rfpqg6a80nid8s4s5dtkm@4ax.com...
    >> On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:20:37 +0100, "Kate"
    >> <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>BTW, what is "fubar"?
    >>>
    >>
    >> fubar = f***ed up beyond all repair. Could be fouled up, but I like
    >> the courser version. :) Originated in the military.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Pat
    >
    > I _thought_ it must be an industry term <grin> I must try and
    > remember it.
    >
    > Thanks for the info on the size of 19" monitors, RF and Phil. It
    > might be possible to squeeze one in if I re-arrange my desk.
    >
    > Re capacitors, when I think of the size of a 12V car battery and
    > that something as small as a capacitor can store a much larger charge,
    > I am amazed.
    >
    > Would using an aerosol can of air be safe for blowing through the
    > vents in the monitor (after taking the necessary precautions, of
    > course), or would it be too powerful? I don`t think I can reverse the
    > suction on my vacuum cleaner.
    >
    >>Another name for thumping, is 'finding the kick plate'; the point at
    >>which you kick a piece of equipment in order to make it work properly
    >>(originated when computer equipement was the size of refrigerators.)
    >
    > I used to work for an oil company in the days before PCs. The
    > Computer Room (note initial caps!) was cavernous and like an empty
    > church : cool and very quiet, with just the hum of the gigantic
    > mainframes working, and the hushed voices of the white-coated
    > technicians who administered to these monoliths. I found it almost
    > mesmeric watching the tape spools rotating back and forth. But now I
    > know what those big red crosses on the cabinets were for ;-)
    >
    > Regards
    > Kate
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    news:eCRAe.2335$oZ.2088@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    > | Re capacitors, when I think of the size of a 12V car battery and
    > | that something as small as a capacitor can store a much larger
    > charge,
    > | I am amazed.
    >
    > _____
    >
    > No, no; the capacitors you find in most electronic devices hold
    > much, much, much less energy than a car battery. It's just that
    > what small amount of energy a capacitor does hold can be released
    > much more quickly. A typical 12 volt car battery might be rated at
    > 60 ampere hours, (60 ampere hours X 12 volts) = 720 watt hours,
    > enough to run a refrigerator for an hour. It might require several
    > minutes to deliver that power. A typical capacitor in a PC power
    > supply might hold 120 watt seconds, only 0.002 % as much. However,
    > new types of capacitors have been developed, low voltage capacitors
    > with storage capacities measured in thousands of farads. Such
    > capicators can be used to store starting power for large vehicles
    > because the stored power can be delivered quickly from a relatively
    > small volume; a smaller than usual ordinary battery supplies normal
    > operating power. The weight of the combination is less than half
    > that of the usual battery.
    >
    > Again, batteries and capacitors are similar in that they both store
    > energy; batteries operate in the time range of seconds, minutes,
    > hours, days - capacitors usually operate in the time range of
    > picoseconds to milliseconds. Batteries store energy chemically,
    > capacitors store energy as electrical charge. Though I guess a
    > capacitor could operate with chemical storage, only slowly. In a
    > power supply, a capicator can be though of as storing power during
    > the high points of a rectified AC cycle and relasing that power
    > during the low points (rectified Alternating Current is pulsating
    > Direct Current.)
    >
    > The second computer room I worked in was very popular in the
    > summer - it had the best air conditioning B^)
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >
    I think I shall have to read the above through several times for it to
    sink in, but I shall get there (I hope). Thank you for taking the
    time and trouble to explain, Phil.

    I have been searching the web and, so far, have found that there don`t
    seem to be many CRT 19" monitors (available in the UK) where you can
    set the colour
    temperature. This is a very important facility for me. Using the
    Colorvision Spyder software I can calibrate RGB amongst other things
    and create an ICM
    which can then be associated with my printer. By recalibrating
    regularly, I have been able to almost achieve WYSIWYG. I`m going to
    continue searching and in the meantime give my current monitor a good
    whack on the side whenever it plays up - which does seem to work.

    Thanks to everyone for your help.
    Kate
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    'Kate' wrote, in part:

    | I have been searching the web and, so far, have found that there don`t
    | seem to be many CRT 19" monitors (available in the UK) where you can
    | set the colour

    _____

    Try the ViewSonic 19" P97+SB (aperture grille [or grill]) at
    (for specifications)
    http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/
    (for resellers)
    http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/resellers/wheretobuy.htm
    With the increasing popularity of LCD monitors, you might want to search for
    specials on discontinued models (as long as thumping continues to work.
    That's the way I got a good price with my Viewsonic A95f.

    Phil Weldon

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:db3fvp$5mt$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    ..
    ..
    ..
    >>
    > I think I shall have to read the above through several times for it to
    > sink in, but I shall get there (I hope). Thank you for taking the
    > time and trouble to explain, Phil.
    >
    > I have been searching the web and, so far, have found that there don`t
    > seem to be many CRT 19" monitors (available in the UK) where you can set
    > the colour
    > temperature. This is a very important facility for me. Using the
    > Colorvision Spyder software I can calibrate RGB amongst other things and
    > create an ICM
    > which can then be associated with my printer. By recalibrating regularly,
    > I have been able to almost achieve WYSIWYG. I`m going to continue
    > searching and in the meantime give my current monitor a good whack on the
    > side whenever it plays up - which does seem to work.
    >
    > Thanks to everyone for your help.
    > Kate
    >
    >
  26. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    news:8JcBe.22415$eM6.4343@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    >
    > | I have been searching the web and, so far, have found that there
    > don`t
    > | seem to be many CRT 19" monitors (available in the UK) where you
    > can
    > | set the colour
    >
    > _____
    >
    > Try the ViewSonic 19" P97+SB (aperture grille [or grill]) at
    > (for specifications)
    > http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/
    > (for resellers)
    > http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/resellers/wheretobuy.htm
    > With the increasing popularity of LCD monitors, you might want to
    > search for specials on discontinued models (as long as thumping
    > continues to work. That's the way I got a good price with my
    > Viewsonic A95f.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >
    > "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:db3fvp$5mt$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    >>
    Most of the monitors that seem to be just what I want are "Out of
    stock", "No longer available" and so on. I had a look at the specs
    for the ViewSonic and it does sound good, and at a reasonable price.
    I also found one or two professional CRT monitors (like the Sony
    Artisan) and although they sounded excellent, the prices were very
    high - presumably because there aren`t many UK stockists so there is
    no competition. I am not keen on buying bulky electronic goods over
    the net, as, if something goes wrong, there is the cost of returning
    it. On site warranties are all very well, but how long would I have
    to wait for someone to call round, I wonder. I shall probably give
    ViewSonic a call to see if I can buy one of these locally. Thank you
    for the recommedation, Phil.

    Kate
  27. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

    'Kate' wrote, in part:
    | Most of the monitors that seem to be just what I want are "Out of
    | stock", "No longer available" and so on. I had a look at the specs
    | for the ViewSonic and it does sound good, and at a reasonable price.

    _____


    Do you have 'walk-in' computer superstores in the UK? I've found the best
    source of 'commodity' items for computers to be a chain like CompUSA. What
    I find there in the way of good prices for monitors are models that have
    been recently discontinued. The warranty will be full term. If anything
    goes wrong with a CRT monitor it is almost certainly something that isn't
    worth the cost of repair. If the monitor is in warranty, you will just be
    supplied a new or refrubished unit (after the faulty unit is inspected for
    physical damage (or greasy dust around the high voltage section - by the
    way, the most stressed part of a CRT monitor is the high voltage section and
    the associated horizontal sweep circuitry.) As with most electronic
    equipment, 90% or more of the faults will occur in the first 30 days. If
    your CRT monitor is in use for many hours per week, after five or six years
    may need internal cleaning, or begin to suffer the pangs of age.

    Good luck, and keep on thumpin'


    Phil Weldon

    "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:db42c1$gg$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk...
    >
    > "Phil Weldon" <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote in message
    > news:8JcBe.22415$eM6.4343@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >> 'Kate' wrote, in part:
    >>
    >> | I have been searching the web and, so far, have found that there don`t
    >> | seem to be many CRT 19" monitors (available in the UK) where you can
    >> | set the colour
    >>
    >> _____
    >>
    >> Try the ViewSonic 19" P97+SB (aperture grille [or grill]) at
    >> (for specifications)
    >> http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/
    >> (for resellers)
    >> http://www.viewsoniceurope.com/uk/resellers/wheretobuy.htm
    >> With the increasing popularity of LCD monitors, you might want to search
    >> for specials on discontinued models (as long as thumping continues to
    >> work. That's the way I got a good price with my Viewsonic A95f.
    >>
    >> Phil Weldon
    >>
    >> "Kate" <@*slamaspam*.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:db3fvp$5mt$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    >>>
    > Most of the monitors that seem to be just what I want are "Out of stock",
    > "No longer available" and so on. I had a look at the specs for the
    > ViewSonic and it does sound good, and at a reasonable price. I also found
    > one or two professional CRT monitors (like the Sony Artisan) and although
    > they sounded excellent, the prices were very high - presumably because
    > there aren`t many UK stockists so there is no competition. I am not keen
    > on buying bulky electronic goods over the net, as, if something goes
    > wrong, there is the cost of returning it. On site warranties are all very
    > well, but how long would I have to wait for someone to call round, I
    > wonder. I shall probably give ViewSonic a call to see if I can buy one of
    > these locally. Thank you for the recommedation, Phil.
    >
    > Kate
    >
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