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How to Shrink Image to Fit on Screen (FX5200)

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Anonymous
July 21, 2005 7:48:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
the bottom task bar at the same time.

I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.

I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.

Thank you for your time and help;
Frank
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 8:13:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

You adjust the SIZE of the image with the MONITOR's front controls.

--
DaveW



"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:t6gvd1546nij5b7egqdanni468apnkfct4@4ax.com...
>I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
> the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
> doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
> the bottom task bar at the same time.
>
> I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
> image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.
>
> I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.
>
> Thank you for your time and help;
> Frank
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 10:44:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:

| I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
| image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.
|

_____

Likely your monitor needs setting to match the resolution and refresh rate
you have picked in 'Display Properties'. Timing changes (resolution and
refresh rates) affect the way the image is displayed on the monitor screen
(centering, size, sometimes even linearity.) Setting the monitor for image
position, size, and linearity requires using the controls ON THE MONITOR.

Phil Weldon

"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:t6gvd1546nij5b7egqdanni468apnkfct4@4ax.com...
>I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
> the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
> doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
> the bottom task bar at the same time.
>
> I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
> image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.
>
> I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.
>
> Thank you for your time and help;
> Frank
Related resources
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 8:28:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
adjust the screen image from the video card.

How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.

Frank
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 1:21:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
| adjust the screen image from the video card.

_____

Tough luck.

The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the manual
for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for

*Horizontal Size
*Vertical Size
*Horizontal Centering
*Vertical Centering
*Linearity.

These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case you
should get a technician to make the adjustments.

The alternatives are

#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work with
your 'big screen TV'
#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:mf72e1hjkb4dcdl2ucg65f07573rti4g5l@4ax.com...
> My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
> the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
> adjust the screen image from the video card.
>
> How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.
>
> Frank
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 5:35:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Thank you for the help. I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort. I just hope I can't hurt
anything.

Frank

On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:21:00 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
<notdiscosed@example.com> wrote:

>'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
>| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
>| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
>| adjust the screen image from the video card.
>
>_____
>
>Tough luck.
>
>The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the manual
>for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for
>
>*Horizontal Size
>*Vertical Size
>*Horizontal Centering
>*Vertical Centering
>*Linearity.
>
>These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case you
>should get a technician to make the adjustments.
>
>The alternatives are
>
>#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work with
>your 'big screen TV'
>#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.
>
>Phil Weldon
>
>
>"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:mf72e1hjkb4dcdl2ucg65f07573rti4g5l@4ax.com...
>> My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
>> the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
>> adjust the screen image from the video card.
>>
>> How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.
>>
>> Frank
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:26:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| I just hope I can't hurt anything.
_____

Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a CRT
based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something. Televisions are
not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and vertical rates. CRT
televisions have very high power horizontal drive circuits that also help
produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons toward the screen. Since
you don't have a profile registered for the TV you use, and since you are
using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the video card to horizontal rates
that the TV set can't handle, and that may cause damage. If you are lucky,
your TV will just reject harmful rates.

Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower frequency
cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video signal will
have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:8lh4e1pklhp11tst8pgsnfmekn5cogcks7@4ax.com...
> Thank you for the help. I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
> changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
> that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
> I watch the screen resize and/or distort. I just hope I can't hurt
> anything.
>
> Frank
>
> On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:21:00 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
> <notdiscosed@example.com> wrote:
>
>>'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
>>| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
>>| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
>>| adjust the screen image from the video card.
>>
>>_____
>>
>>Tough luck.
>>
>>The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the
>>manual
>>for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for
>>
>>*Horizontal Size
>>*Vertical Size
>>*Horizontal Centering
>>*Vertical Centering
>>*Linearity.
>>
>>These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case
>>you
>>should get a technician to make the adjustments.
>>
>>The alternatives are
>>
>>#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work
>>with
>>your 'big screen TV'
>>#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.
>>
>>Phil Weldon
>>
>>
>>"Philadelphia Frank" <philafrank@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:mf72e1hjkb4dcdl2ucg65f07573rti4g5l@4ax.com...
>>> My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
>>> the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
>>> adjust the screen image from the video card.
>>>
>>> How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.
>>>
>>> Frank
>>
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 8:33:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

Phil Weldon wrote:
> 'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
> | I just hope I can't hurt anything.
> _____
>
> Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a CRT
> based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something. Televisions are
> not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and vertical rates. CRT
> televisions have very high power horizontal drive circuits that also help
> produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons toward the screen. Since
> you don't have a profile registered for the TV you use, and since you are
> using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the video card to horizontal rates
> that the TV set can't handle, and that may cause damage. If you are lucky,
> your TV will just reject harmful rates.
>
> Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower frequency
> cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video signal will
> have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.

Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
standard the TV uses).

--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 9:10:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

'Robert Hancock' wrote:
| Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
| be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
| the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
| standard the TV uses).
_____

Except that 'Philadelphia Frank' posted
"I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort."

Don't you think that is a pretty good indication that the horizontal and
vertical scan rates ARE changing, and the output being used is NOT
composite?

Phil Weldon


"Robert Hancock" <hancockr@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in message
news:aeZFe.58644$5V4.8106@pd7tw3no...
> Phil Weldon wrote:
>> 'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
>> | I just hope I can't hurt anything.
>> _____
>>
>> Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a
>> CRT based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something.
>> Televisions are not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and
>> vertical rates. CRT televisions have very high power horizontal drive
>> circuits that also help produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons
>> toward the screen. Since you don't have a profile registered for the TV
>> you use, and since you are using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the
>> video card to horizontal rates that the TV set can't handle, and that may
>> cause damage. If you are lucky, your TV will just reject harmful rates.
>>
>> Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower
>> frequency cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video
>> signal will have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.
>
> Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not be
> possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on the TV
> out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever standard the
> TV uses).
>
> --
> Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
> To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
> Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 3:56:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.nvidia (More info?)

The Nvidia driver did what I needed. There was a NKeystone menu that
allowed me to shrink the image so that it fit on my HDTV. A problem
I'm still having is that the "Keystone" adjustment doesn't always
hold. If I run Flight Simulator the window reverts back to it's too
big size. I can't see or use the top part of the screen.

I suspect the top part of the screen is cut off for broadcast TV as
well, particularly when I'm using the 4.3 aspect. The brand of TV is
AKAI and it isn't very user friendly. The "customer care" is even
worse. I'll bet there is a way to make adjustments but Akai isn't
volunteering any info on how.

So my original question has been answered. Nvidia has a "Keystone"
adjustment that did the trick.

Thank you for all your help;

Frank

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 05:10:46 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
<notdiscosed@example.com> wrote:

>'Robert Hancock' wrote:
>| Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
>| be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
>| the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
>| standard the TV uses).
>_____
>
>Except that 'Philadelphia Frank' posted
>"I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
>changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
>that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
>I watch the screen resize and/or distort."
>
>Don't you think that is a pretty good indication that the horizontal and
>vertical scan rates ARE changing, and the output being used is NOT
>composite?
>
>Phil Weldon
>
>
>"Robert Hancock" <hancockr@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in message
>news:aeZFe.58644$5V4.8106@pd7tw3no...
>> Phil Weldon wrote:
>>> 'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
>>> | I just hope I can't hurt anything.
>>> _____
>>>
>>> Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a
>>> CRT based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something.
>>> Televisions are not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and
>>> vertical rates. CRT televisions have very high power horizontal drive
>>> circuits that also help produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons
>>> toward the screen. Since you don't have a profile registered for the TV
>>> you use, and since you are using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the
>>> video card to horizontal rates that the TV set can't handle, and that may
>>> cause damage. If you are lucky, your TV will just reject harmful rates.
>>>
>>> Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower
>>> frequency cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video
>>> signal will have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.
>>
>> Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not be
>> possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on the TV
>> out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever standard the
>> TV uses).
>>
>> --
>> Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
>> To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
>> Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/
>
!