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HP TouchPad's History: Lessons Learned, Bidding Adieu

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November 1, 2011 1:19:29 PM

Wish i'd got one now...
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-4
November 1, 2011 1:24:33 PM

Quote:
There are mixed emotions associated with the death of the TouchPad. Most of them are best summed up in the picture above. It's a sad day for consumers when another competitor bites the dust.


She doesn't look sad.

Quote:
Customers Tech illiterate sheeple want the complete package. Right at launch, Apple had strong third-party app support, a media store, and backward-compatibility with phone apps.


Let's call things their proper names, shall we? ;)  The only "complete package" devices to date I've seen were Nokia Symbian phones. You didn't need ANY "apps" to fully utilise the hardware of the phone, it was all preinstalled and worked out of the box. THAT is a complete package; not a phone that burns a hole in your pocket and offers access to thousands of apps.

Please, make Tom's articles sound like they're actually addressed towards a literate audience and not awed Apple fanboys who're shouting about their "complete packages" on every corner - I've heard that phrase (complete package/bundle/etc.) from every Apple fanboy and it has no meaning whatsoever.
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7
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November 1, 2011 1:55:51 PM

How could this article not mention the Kindle Fire? Low price point? Check. Appstore? Check. Surfing (via Silk)? Check. Android? Check.
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0
November 1, 2011 1:58:38 PM

that you Jane?
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7
November 1, 2011 2:03:16 PM

Touchpad fire sale is only available in the US. not in our country... If it had, I'd buy 20 of these.
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0
November 1, 2011 2:34:40 PM

zorky9that you Jane?


Yep!

vaughn2kTouchpad fire sale is only available in the US. not in our country... If it had, I'd buy 20 of these.


It was across the U.S., Canada, and a lot of Europe. Not sure about other countries, but it was definitely not just the U.S.
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7
November 1, 2011 2:38:46 PM

I love reading posts from amk-nerd-phantom; her posts remind me of how ignorant and clueless most IT nerds are.
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0
November 1, 2011 2:49:54 PM

getrealI love reading posts from amk-nerd-phantom; her posts remind me of how ignorant and clueless most IT nerds are.


Glad you're entertained; now please elaborate on my ignorance and cluelessness :lol:  And define "nerd". Most likely I don't fit under the definition at all.
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-3
November 1, 2011 3:02:12 PM

iPad 3 ftw.
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-5
November 1, 2011 3:16:01 PM

amk-aka-phantomGlad you're entertained; now please elaborate on my ignorance and cluelessness And define "nerd". Most likely I don't fit under the definition at all.


In short - trolling anything and everything that says Apple or consoles and pretending the minority of the market (hardcore / enthusiast) is the majority. Nerd is referring to polarized standpoint and bias to said sector, and basically saying that everyone else is dumb.

I don't necessarily disagree with you all of the time, it's just that I know if I read one of your comments, it is going to be 100% troll, so it is difficult to take seriously.
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2
November 1, 2011 3:27:56 PM

Quote:
Let's call things their proper names, shall we? ;)  The only "complete package" devices to date I've seen were Nokia Symbian phones. You didn't need ANY "apps" to fully utilise the hardware of the phone, it was all preinstalled and worked out of the box. THAT is a complete package; not a phone that burns a hole in your pocket and offers access to thousands of apps.

Please, make Tom's articles sound like they're actually addressed towards a literate audience and not awed Apple fanboys who're shouting about their "complete packages" on every corner - I've heard that phrase (complete package/bundle/etc.) from every Apple fanboy and it has no meaning whatsoever.


Please actually try to make an intelligent post before embarrassing yourself. I am hardly an apple fan, and what you said is just simply, downright incorrect.

The fact is, Apple dominates the tablet market, enough so that most people that buy one don't feel like a hole is being burned in their pocket. The sales stats should provide adequate evidence for my assessment.

Context doesn't seem to be your friend, I think what Jane was saying by "complete package" is a subjective, yet appropriate terminology to imply that Apple tablets have plenty of support out of the box including thousands upon thousands of apps, while Google is struggling to find developers. So, instead of trying to sound "technically correct", try to at least sound like you know what you are talking about, because most of the market disagrees with your less than obvious conjectures.
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2
November 1, 2011 3:47:33 PM

getrealIn short - trolling anything and everything that says Apple or consoles and pretending the minority of the market (hardcore / enthusiast) is the majority. Nerd is referring to polarized standpoint and bias to said sector, and basically saying that everyone else is dumb.I don't necessarily disagree with you all of the time, it's just that I know if I read one of your comments, it is going to be 100% troll, so it is difficult to take seriously.


Well, just so you know, I'm not trolling. I really DO think that PC gaming is superior to console gaming in every way and I really DO hate Apple (and any other company that offers an inferior product for a greater price and advertises software that can be installed on a device as a FEATURE - think Siri; and don't forget the patent trolling). If you think that's trolling, you're sadly mistaken. Besides, more than half of this website agrees with me.

It's not even the consoles or Apple as such that piss me off; in fact, consoles are a perfect tool for cheap gaming in countries whose residents can't afford to spend a lot ($300 console, pirate all the games = ultra cheap gaming) and I applaud Apple for taking advantage of people's illiteracy, these iZombies deserve that.

No, what pisses me off is that we are forced to hear this BS here at Tom's... not the correct website for it, since most people here are PC enthusiasts. I support kicking out all non-PC/software news to Tom's Guide and adding an option to disable them in the news feed.

I never pretend that enthusiasts are the majority of the market. I only say that enthusiasts make the best choices. And it's not hard to find the best hardware for the price, and you learn a lot in the process. If you want to buy something, make sure you know what you're paying for. Don't have to read benchmarks and reviews for months in order to understand that MacBook Pro or Sony Vaio aren't the best value for money. I can understand that not everyone might want to know about the latest and greatest PC hardware. However, there's ALWAYS someone you can ask to help you find a good new PC/laptop instead of buying the most hyped one like most people do; and I won't even mention phones/tablets; comparing them is very easy. Just check which one has the most connectivity interfaces, then go into the shop and try it out. From my experience, taking some time to choose always pays off in the end.

So take me seriously - whatever I say, I mean it.
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1
November 1, 2011 3:55:14 PM

FuryliciousPlease actually try to make an intelligent post before embarrassing yourself. I am hardly an apple fan, and what you said is just simply, downright incorrect.The fact is, Apple dominates the tablet market, enough so that most people that buy one don't feel like a hole is being burned in their pocket. The sales stats should provide adequate evidence for my assessment.Context doesn't seem to be your friend, I think what Jane was saying by "complete package" is a subjective, yet appropriate terminology to imply that Apple tablets have plenty of support out of the box including thousands upon thousands of apps, while Google is struggling to find developers. So, instead of trying to sound "technically correct", try to at least sound like you know what you are talking about, because most of the market disagrees with your less than obvious conjectures.


Reading fail for you. "Let's call the things their proper names" referred to the part of the article's quote which I corrected. As for "complete package", I understand what Jane meant, of course; but if you read my above post carefully, I've explained why I dismiss that particular definition of a "complete package". It's the same for MacBook owners who think they've got a great deal because of "complete package" - a laptop that came with the software installed, ZOMG! - but what they don't realise is that they were severely ripped off since that "software" isn't worth a single cent, because you can get it all for free. Open source, anyone? :) 

Also, Android has thousands upon thousands of apps, as well. And the great thing about Symbian era was that the smartphones were evaluated by their hardware and not by the amount of website-emulating apps that you can download instead of visiting the website in your browser.
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-1
November 1, 2011 4:05:03 PM

with the way the kindl;e fire is gaining popularity i wonder if that device will be considered part of the google/android sales since amazon said it would be a customized version of android going on that tablet
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0
November 1, 2011 4:14:38 PM

amk-aka-phantomReading fail for you. "Let's call the things their proper names" referred to the part of the article's quote which I corrected. As for "complete package", I understand what Jane meant, of course; but if you read my above post carefully, I've explained why I dismiss that particular definition of a "complete package". It's the same for MacBook owners who think they've got a great deal because of "complete package" - a laptop that came with the software installed, ZOMG! - but what they don't realise is that they were severely ripped off since that "software" isn't worth a single cent, because you can get it all for free. Open source, anyone? Also, Android has thousands upon thousands of apps, as well. And the great thing about Symbian era was that the smartphones were evaluated by their hardware and not by the amount of website-emulating apps that you can download instead of visiting the website in your browser.


Don't you worry, I did read your post. If the term "complete package" makes you that upset, it makes me wonder what you think about any OS out there that doesn't have every bit of software available out of the box. It's simply not cost effective, so sorry if you haven't realized that yet. Hell, with the phone and tablet market, it comes with standard apps regardless, and a market where you can utilize your phone in a way that is efficient for your lifestyle, so that the hardware doesn't get cluttered with useless garbage that an average person might not need.

Also, have you tried other alternative "open source" photoshop software? To me, they aren't as great, which is why people pay the extra bucks to get a software out of box that makes sense to THEM. Maybe you, being a tech savvy person, don't mind going through hours of learning curves using different types of available software, but the average thinking world doesn't care to go about, download software from sites that are unfamiliar to them, then skimming through online forums and websites to learn how to use it. Most people are simply familiar with photoshop and quite honestly, it's a good quality product, and because it is, people are fine spending those extra bucks.

Also, since we are on the lines of talking about Apple computers, which I never cared to purchase one myself (just to let you know, once again, I hardly care for Apple), maybe you should look up some stats out there that show that Apple computers have good customer service and good hardware, which might explain why they are more expensive than your average computer? And of course the software, which I've explained. If Apple is such a terrible, money stealing company, then why do people seem to be happy with their products? Have you ever seen an unhappy Apple customer? I haven't. So obviously the company is doing something right, whether you disagree with their tactics or not. They are profitable company, sitting comfortably in the market. So..?

I love Android, but if you had a bit of sense about you, you would know that developers go to Apple and not Android, because they go for where the money. So again, quality comes into the picture. So, you have yet again, failed to establish a good point regarding your Apple hating posts.

Hell, I hate Apple, but even I can admit that they are doing many things right where many others are not.
Score
2
November 1, 2011 4:14:41 PM

amk-aka-phantomReading fail for you. "Let's call the things their proper names" referred to the part of the article's quote which I corrected. As for "complete package", I understand what Jane meant, of course; but if you read my above post carefully, I've explained why I dismiss that particular definition of a "complete package". It's the same for MacBook owners who think they've got a great deal because of "complete package" - a laptop that came with the software installed, ZOMG! - but what they don't realise is that they were severely ripped off since that "software" isn't worth a single cent, because you can get it all for free. Open source, anyone? Also, Android has thousands upon thousands of apps, as well. And the great thing about Symbian era was that the smartphones were evaluated by their hardware and not by the amount of website-emulating apps that you can download instead of visiting the website in your browser.


Don't you worry, I did read your post. If the term "complete package" makes you that upset, it makes me wonder what you think about any OS out there that doesn't have every bit of software available out of the box. It's simply not cost effective, so sorry if you haven't realized that yet. Hell, with the phone and tablet market, it comes with standard apps regardless, and a market where you can utilize your phone in a way that is efficient for your lifestyle, so that the hardware doesn't get cluttered with useless garbage that an average person might not need.

Also, have you tried other alternative "open source" photoshop software? To me, they aren't as great, which is why people pay the extra bucks to get a software out of box that makes sense to THEM. Maybe you, being a tech savvy person, don't mind going through hours of learning curves using different types of available software, but the average thinking world doesn't care to go about, download software from sites that are unfamiliar to them, then skimming through online forums and websites to learn how to use it. Most people are simply familiar with photoshop and quite honestly, it's a good quality product, and because it is, people are fine spending those extra bucks.

Also, since we are on the lines of talking about Apple computers, which I never cared to purchase one myself (just to let you know, once again, I hardly care for Apple), maybe you should look up some stats out there that show that Apple computers have good customer service and good hardware, which might explain why they are more expensive than your average computer? And of course the software, which I've explained. If Apple is such a terrible, money stealing company, then why do people seem to be happy with their products? Have you ever seen an unhappy Apple customer? I haven't. So obviously the company is doing something right, whether you disagree with their tactics or not. They are profitable company, sitting comfortably in the market. So..?

I love Android, but if you had a bit of sense about you, you would know that developers go to Apple and not Android, because they go for where the money. So again, quality comes into the picture. So, you have yet again, failed to establish a good point regarding your Apple hating posts.

Hell, I hate Apple, but even I can admit that they are doing many things right where many others are not.
Score
1
November 1, 2011 4:27:38 PM

@Furylicious @amk-aka-phantom Let's call a spade a spade. Companies are not trying to just make a tablet for a tablet sake. They are purposely gunning for an iPad killer and want a large percentage of the market share. Asus' CEO commented on such for the Transformer. And they are right to do so. A company's future in tablets is going to depend on selling more than a few thousand units.

@getreal Completely agree. Let's not pretend that tech news is limited to Bulldozer, Extreme Edition, etc... When we evaluate a product, we look at everything from top to bottom. That's why we review budget graphics cards and budget processors. Our Sandy review included the i3. That comprehensive approach should extend to everything. It's the right way to approach a product. Those looking for a more narrow view of the world don't need benchmarks to tell them what product to buy.

Andrew Ku
TomsHardware.com
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0
November 1, 2011 4:44:37 PM

acku@Furylicious @amk-aka-phantom Let's call a spade a spade. Companies are not trying to just make a tablet for a tablet sake. They are purposely gunning for an iPad killer and want a large percentage of the market share. Asus' CEO commented on such for the Transformer. And they are right to do so. A company's future in tablets is going to depend on selling more than a few thousand units.


I agree to some extent. As far as the market goes, you are completely correct. iPad is where its at, and there is no denying that. But, I think the approach of creating an "iPad killer" is not effective, not in the sense of creating copy cats.

I can bring another example, Call of Duty. Call of Duty is the spade when it comes to FPS games, but the one thing that I hate more than CoD is when a competitor makes a game to "kill it" and it's exactly the same.

Of course, looking at the transformer, and being able to play with it a bit, it does not feel like an iPad at all. I actually like it, and with the capability of converting (or transforming) to a laptop/netbook like computer, I think it brings a very different approach, one that I hope Asus continues to improve since it isn't completely perfect.
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1
November 1, 2011 4:50:20 PM

FuryliciousI agree to some extent. As far as the market goes, you are completely correct. iPad is where its at, and there is no denying that. But, I think the approach of creating an "iPad killer" is not effective, not in the sense of creating copy cats.I can bring another example, Call of Duty. Call of Duty is the spade when it comes to FPS games, but the one thing that I hate more than CoD is when a competitor makes a game to "kill it" and it's exactly the same.Of course, looking at the transformer, and being able to play with it a bit, it does not feel like an iPad at all. I actually like it, and with the capability of converting (or transforming) to a laptop/netbook like computer, I think it brings a very different approach, one that I hope Asus continues to improve since it isn't completely perfect.


Point taken. I think is good to have some discord. It's gonna to be unnatural for two people to agree on everything. But I definitely part ways with the sentiment that makes either of us immediately wrong.

I especially dislike the idea of discounting consumers unwilling to spend 2000 for a system just to play games. There are plenty of wow gamers that care about performance. We cover everything when there's an ability to dig deep into tech.

@Furylicious ---> The following isn't directed at you. It's for others. :) 

If you don't care about benchmarks on tablets or a technical discussion on SoCs, then certainly head over to tomsguide. But here at tomshardware, we apply that approach to everything.
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1
November 1, 2011 6:47:04 PM

I love my TouchPad, for email, web, movies, games and the apps I care about it is perfect. It's smooth, fast and I have no complaints at all. I'll b e using my touchpad for 5-10 years unless it breaks somehow. Even if the OS never gets another update and I stick with my current 60 apps I'm happy as a clam, email will be the same in 10yrs and so will basic web sites....the games on there will still be fun, my utilities will still work fine! Thank you HP!
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1
November 1, 2011 7:08:56 PM

JMcEntegartYep!It was across the U.S., Canada, and a lot of Europe. Not sure about other countries, but it was definitely not just the U.S.


Interesting place to be holding something called "TouchPad" over.

Pretty eyes, by the way.
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0
November 1, 2011 7:30:02 PM

I understand what Jane means by "complete package" and for her context it is a perfectly accurate characterization of the iPad/Apple devices. But there’s also more than one definition of complete package. Like the writer above this post said, for many people, including me, the Touchpad is a complete package. It has all the functions, features and apps I want. My guess is for most IT type, the Touchpad is a complete package. Email, Exchange Server, VPN client, Scheduling, web surfing, USB functionality, document portability and others is pretty much the necessities.
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November 1, 2011 7:36:47 PM

I understand what Jane means by "complete package" and for her context it is a perfectly accurate characterization of the iPad/Apple devices. But there’s also more than one definition of complete package. Like the writer above this post said, for many people, including me, the Touchpad is a complete package. It has all the functions, features and apps I want. My guess is for most IT type, the Touchpad is a complete package. Email, Exchange Server, VPN client, Scheduling, web surfing, USB functionality, document portability and others is pretty much the necessities.
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-1
November 1, 2011 7:37:38 PM

I understand what Jane means by "complete package" and for her context it is a perfectly accurate characterization of the iPad/Apple devices. But there’s also more than one definition of complete package. Like the writer above this post said, for many people, including me, the Touchpad is a complete package. It has all the functions, features and apps I want. My guess is for most IT type, the Touchpad is a complete package. Email, Exchange Server, VPN client, Scheduling, web surfing, USB functionality, document portability and others is pretty much the necessities.
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-1
November 1, 2011 7:48:53 PM

JMcEntegartIt was across the U.S., Canada, and a lot of Europe. Not sure about other countries, but it was definitely not just the U.S.

The first fire sale also happened to other countries at least including NZ and "HK".
The quotation marks on "HK". All touchpad were sold at the time they started the firesale because they were all sold to their own staff or someone had some connection to staff in HP/dealer.
The second fire sale was only in NA
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0
November 1, 2011 10:24:45 PM

Nice article but you don't seem to want to mention the furious outrage of the customers. The way HP put the touchpad to bed was one of bait and switch and pissing off potential buyers in this market is very bad business. Yet I see no stories about this betrayal! Even on their facebook page they deleted all the posts about this. What kind of message does that send to people who had been waiting for two months not to mention all the back orders that was left out to dry. This type of corporate behavior will alienate a buyer for life. Like me ;/
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0
November 1, 2011 10:49:17 PM

Reading this article made HP look like it sacrificed itself to teach non-Apple tablet makers a lesson. I realize that's not what HP was out to do, but this whole fiasco simply backs up my prior statements; Android tablets are priced too high for too little appeal.

If I was to drop $500 on, say, a Xoom I'd rather just buy the iPad.
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November 1, 2011 11:25:41 PM

eddieroolzReading this article made HP look like it sacrificed itself to teach non-Apple tablet makers a lesson. I realize that's not what HP was out to do, but this whole fiasco simply backs up my prior statements; Android tablets are priced too high for too little appeal.If I was to drop $500 on, say, a Xoom I'd rather just buy the iPad.


It also makes you wonder why a company like HP doesn't eat into some profits, and just low-ball everyone else to gain market share for WebOS. Losing $100 a tablet might seem like a lot, but sometimes gaining market share, particularly when your software is good, can be a long term market changer, and yield years of dividends.

After spending so much to get WebOS, why are they in such a rush to kill it? Eat a few hundred million dollars worth of losses to gain a market presence that will gain billions of dollars in the future. Once it gains acceptance and a large installed base, they can make money in software sales, licensing add-ons, or even licensing WebOS to other hardware makers. Short term thinking is a sin a lot of companies commit.
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1
November 2, 2011 1:11:00 AM

Hey you damn Touchpad box... you're blocking the view. I MEAN- Uh yeah, too bad I missed out on that firesale... I might have to wait and see what Amazon releases next.
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2
November 2, 2011 2:02:55 AM

where is the +1 for the last pic?
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1
November 2, 2011 4:33:10 AM

furylicious said:
Don't you worry, I did read your post. If the term "complete package" makes you that upset, it makes me wonder what you think about any OS out there that doesn't have every bit of software available out of the box. It's simply not cost effective, so sorry if you haven't realized that yet. Hell, with the phone and tablet market, it comes with standard apps regardless, and a market where you can utilize your phone in a way that is efficient for your lifestyle, so that the hardware doesn't get cluttered with useless garbage that an average person might not need.

Also, have you tried other alternative "open source" photoshop software? To me, they aren't as great, which is why people pay the extra bucks to get a software out of box that makes sense to THEM. Maybe you, being a tech savvy person, don't mind going through hours of learning curves using different types of available software, but the average thinking world doesn't care to go about, download software from sites that are unfamiliar to them, then skimming through online forums and websites to learn how to use it. Most people are simply familiar with photoshop and quite honestly, it's a good quality product, and because it is, people are fine spending those extra bucks.

Also, since we are on the lines of talking about Apple computers, which I never cared to purchase one myself (just to let you know, once again, I hardly care for Apple), maybe you should look up some stats out there that show that Apple computers have good customer service and good hardware, which might explain why they are more expensive than your average computer? And of course the software, which I've explained. If Apple is such a terrible, money stealing company, then why do people seem to be happy with their products? Have you ever seen an unhappy Apple customer? I haven't. So obviously the company is doing something right, whether you disagree with their tactics or not. They are profitable company, sitting comfortably in the market. So..?

I love Android, but if you had a bit of sense about you, you would know that developers go to Apple and not Android, because they go for where the money. So again, quality comes into the picture. So, you have yet again, failed to establish a good point regarding your Apple hating posts.

Hell, I hate Apple, but even I can admit that they are doing many things right where many others are not.


Open source Photoshop alternative? You mean, GIMP? That thing sucks. USe Paint.NET. It's free and very, very similar to Photoshop. When I meant open source, I didn't mean crazy nonsense like GIMP... FF, Thunderbird or even closed source but free (like Skype) applications is more than enough to provide you with full functionality. It is NOT worth overpaying for a "package". You don't need any extra training to use FF, Thunderbird or LibreOffice, they're built to satisfy users who shifted from proprietary software right away.

Apple customers seem happy because they're mostly technically illiterate users who don't know what they're paying for and buy all the hype about design and "no viruses" and "good customer service". Good customer service? EVERYONE has good customer service nowadays if you aren't a retard. I go to Asus to exchange my board, they tell me it's beyond repair - do you want a new one of the same model, or pay a bit more and get a newer model, or a refund? And every company is like that nowadays.

And man... good hardware? You have to be kidding.

Surely devs go for Apple, I know that. Still, Android somehow has a few hundred thousand apps... :lol: 

Quote:
Hey you damn Touchpad box... you're blocking the view. I MEAN- Uh yeah, too bad I missed out on that firesale... I might have to wait and see what Amazon releases next.


lol

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-1
November 2, 2011 6:03:58 AM

When I originally got the HP touchpad during the sale, I had plans to put android on it as soon as it was available but now no longer feel a need to rush into it.

In my opinion, the webos has the best UI when compared to android and iOS

If HP originally started the sales of the device with a lower price tag, and did a few performance optimizations, it would have been extremely popular

For most of the hardware they got most things right.

1GB ram
Dual core CPU runs great at 1.83GHz
16-32-64GB storage
Best tablet speakers on the market in terms of sound quality and frequency response (tablet speakers still suck though)

Areas where it lacks

Horrid camera, probably along the lines of the gameboy camera.

No powered USB host (can still act as a USB host for flash drives and keyboard and mice and game controllers, but you need to have a powered USB hub)

No SD card slow, instead it has a simcard slot (oversized) that is not connected to anything.

Bluetooth filters designed to prevent you from connecting to non HP branded devices (though with the 3.0.4 update, they removed one of the filters specifically for hands free calling but left all other filters in tact)

They filter all non HP branded printers, with all of their restrictions, it makes most of their selling points useless since they have such strict limitations that are artificially imposed that the features are useless. (though android will fix that)

PS most tablets still use 512MB ram including the ipad 2.

And from benchmarks, the CPU in the touchpad is faster than that of the the on the nvidia chips (the GPU is also faster), the CPU also beats the ones in the ipad 2, though the touchpad's GPU is slower (ipad 2 has the fastest mobile GPU on the market when it comes to arm tablets)



Overall, HP ruined what would have been a great product that would have competed well.
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1
Anonymous
a b α HP
November 2, 2011 2:33:27 PM

Just like VooDoo PC a few years back..so sad...
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0
November 2, 2011 4:17:24 PM

amk-aka-phantomOpen source Photoshop alternative? You mean, GIMP? That thing sucks. USe Paint.NET. It's free and very, very similar to Photoshop. When I meant open source, I didn't mean crazy nonsense like GIMP... FF, Thunderbird or even closed source but free (like Skype) applications is more than enough to provide you with full functionality. It is NOT worth overpaying for a "package". You don't need any extra training to use FF, Thunderbird or LibreOffice, they're built to satisfy users who shifted from proprietary software right away.Apple customers seem happy because they're mostly technically illiterate users who don't know what they're paying for and buy all the hype about design and "no viruses" and "good customer service". Good customer service? EVERYONE has good customer service nowadays if you aren't a retard. I go to Asus to exchange my board, they tell me it's beyond repair - do you want a new one of the same model, or pay a bit more and get a newer model, or a refund? And every company is like that nowadays.And man... good hardware? You have to be kidding.Surely devs go for Apple, I know that. Still, Android somehow has a few hundred thousand apps


Everyone has good customer service? Says WHO? I've been working in repair for close to 5 years now and that is the furthest thing from the truth. You bring up Asus, which also has a VERY high customer service rating, so that isn't the best example. I've never had issues with Asus, but other companies like HP, Acer/Gateway/Emachines, and even Samsung has given us hell CONSISTENTLY. HP is probably the worst one that I've personally experienced, but not "EVERYONE" gives good customer service, sorry, but that is simply a lie.

And perhaps we look at things differently, but I don't completely disagree with your argument. Personally, using "open source" software to emulate similar software that is paid is something I'm always open to do. Sometimes a little bit of research goes a long way, but when it comes to business applications, the one thing you must understand is that many companies don't invest a lot of time into open source programs. There are two primary reasons for this:

a) Companies don't invest a lot of money into an IT department
b) Support

Now, for reason (a), this is out of sheer negligence and ignorance, which we can fault to the company, right? And you are right, people do not take the time to look deeply into IT - people capable enough to provide easy solution and alternatives to the company so that they don't invest a good portion of their money to software that is available and free.

Reason b), is the reason (or the excuse, if you wish) that companies cough up money to software companies. They expect that when they invest money into a company, that they get support from those manufacturers. Now as far as the quality in that service is debatable, but it makes it easier for the company to handle those applications because they don't just expect the product, but service. So, with these companies like Adobe, they invest into their customer service because of this reason. Because they KNOW that there are alternatives that are cheaper and even free.

So, it goes both ways. But when it comes to making business and making decisions, it isn't always so clear cut, even when it seems to be. People don't have a lot of free time to simply dig around for alternatives and their confidence in free software may not seem appealing and even reliable.

Just my two cents.
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