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Compatibility of Power Supplies

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August 10, 2004 3:32:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

The power supply in my Multimedia 7900 recently died and I also have
an old Legand 4610 lying around that has seen better days, but the
power supply apparently still works. Frankly, I've been hearing a lot
of horror stories about Packard Bell proprietary parts and I was just
wondering if I could use that older power supply in the 7900. Are
they compatible? I appreciate any info that anyone could give me.

Thanks
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 10, 2004 3:56:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

Give me the serial number from each unit
and I can tell you
There may be someone here who knows the model specifics

"Igor" <thoovler@excite.com> wrote in message
news:D 434b6c6.0408092232.16823e63@posting.google.com...
> The power supply in my Multimedia 7900 recently died and I also have
> an old Legand 4610 lying around that has seen better days, but the
> power supply apparently still works. Frankly, I've been hearing a lot
> of horror stories about Packard Bell proprietary parts and I was just
> wondering if I could use that older power supply in the 7900. Are
> they compatible? I appreciate any info that anyone could give me.
>
> Thanks
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 10, 2004 9:38:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

For the most part, PB did not use power supplies with proprietary connectors.
Some PB power supplies have strange shapes. Nearly all PB power supplies have
an uncomfortably low wattage rating which makes upgrades sometimes
problematic... Ben Myers

On 9 Aug 2004 23:32:59 -0700, thoovler@excite.com (Igor) wrote:

>The power supply in my Multimedia 7900 recently died and I also have
>an old Legand 4610 lying around that has seen better days, but the
>power supply apparently still works. Frankly, I've been hearing a lot
>of horror stories about Packard Bell proprietary parts and I was just
>wondering if I could use that older power supply in the 7900. Are
>they compatible? I appreciate any info that anyone could give me.
>
>Thanks
Related resources
August 15, 2004 9:30:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote in message news:<411907bc.5239835@news.charter.net>...
> For the most part, PB did not use power supplies with proprietary connectors.
> Some PB power supplies have strange shapes. Nearly all PB power supplies have
> an uncomfortably low wattage rating which makes upgrades sometimes
> problematic... Ben Myers
>
> On 9 Aug 2004 23:32:59 -0700, thoovler@excite.com (Igor) wrote:
>
> >The power supply in my Multimedia 7900 recently died and I also have
> >an old Legand 4610 lying around that has seen better days, but the
> >power supply apparently still works. Frankly, I've been hearing a lot
> >of horror stories about Packard Bell proprietary parts and I was just
> >wondering if I could use that older power supply in the 7900. Are
> >they compatible? I appreciate any info that anyone could give me.
> >
> >Thanks


Well, I finally managed to get into the machines and check them. The
motherboard connectors aren't even close. Thanks for your replies
anyway, guys.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2004 7:03:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

Well, then, given PB's track record, one power supply has two (maybe three?)
connectors to the motherboard, and the other has merely a single connector to a
double row of pins. The former would be the older AT standard power supply and
the latter would be ATX. Both are industry standards which allow for
substitution of non-PB power supplies, as long as the physical form factor is
the same.

For testing purposes, it is often sufficient to attach a generic power supply,
leaving it outside the computer chassis, just to see if the motherboard (and
peripherals) boot up. This approach allows for isolation of a failed component,
either power supply or motherboard... Ben Myers

On 15 Aug 2004 05:30:21 -0700, thoovler@excite.com (Igor) wrote:

>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote in message news:<411907bc.5239835@news.charter.net>...
>> For the most part, PB did not use power supplies with proprietary connectors.
>> Some PB power supplies have strange shapes. Nearly all PB power supplies have
>> an uncomfortably low wattage rating which makes upgrades sometimes
>> problematic... Ben Myers
>>
>> On 9 Aug 2004 23:32:59 -0700, thoovler@excite.com (Igor) wrote:
>>
>> >The power supply in my Multimedia 7900 recently died and I also have
>> >an old Legand 4610 lying around that has seen better days, but the
>> >power supply apparently still works. Frankly, I've been hearing a lot
>> >of horror stories about Packard Bell proprietary parts and I was just
>> >wondering if I could use that older power supply in the 7900. Are
>> >they compatible? I appreciate any info that anyone could give me.
>> >
>> >Thanks
>
>
>Well, I finally managed to get into the machines and check them. The
>motherboard connectors aren't even close. Thanks for your replies
>anyway, guys.
August 19, 2004 9:02:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote in message news:<411f7a6b.852811@news.charter.net>...
> Well, then, given PB's track record, one power supply has two (maybe three?)
> connectors to the motherboard, and the other has merely a single connector to a
> double row of pins. The former would be the older AT standard power supply and
> the latter would be ATX. Both are industry standards which allow for
> substitution of non-PB power supplies, as long as the physical form factor is
> the same.
>
> For testing purposes, it is often sufficient to attach a generic power supply,
> leaving it outside the computer chassis, just to see if the motherboard (and
> peripherals) boot up. This approach allows for isolation of a failed component,
> either power supply or motherboard... Ben Myers
>

So, is there any sort of adapter that can allow the AT power supply to
connect to the ATX connector on the motherboard?
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
August 19, 2004 6:08:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

Yes, AT-to-ATX adapters are available and also adapters to provide 12v to a
Pentium 4 motherboard, but these are last ditch options. ATX power supplies are
really quite inexpensive... Ben Myers

On 19 Aug 2004 05:02:19 -0700, thoovler@excite.com (Igor) wrote:

>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote in message news:<411f7a6b.852811@news.charter.net>...
>> Well, then, given PB's track record, one power supply has two (maybe three?)
>> connectors to the motherboard, and the other has merely a single connector to a
>> double row of pins. The former would be the older AT standard power supply and
>> the latter would be ATX. Both are industry standards which allow for
>> substitution of non-PB power supplies, as long as the physical form factor is
>> the same.
>>
>> For testing purposes, it is often sufficient to attach a generic power supply,
>> leaving it outside the computer chassis, just to see if the motherboard (and
>> peripherals) boot up. This approach allows for isolation of a failed component,
>> either power supply or motherboard... Ben Myers
>>
>
>So, is there any sort of adapter that can allow the AT power supply to
>connect to the ATX connector on the motherboard?
!