Monitor test mode in Multiimedia Pulsar S

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to use
a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for passwords
which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this computer
without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing the
bios do this trick?)

Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when in
reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to see
which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try to
put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it

So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test mode
in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.

Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or the
computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?

LtoQ
16 answers Last reply
More about monitor test mode multiimedia pulsar
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium battery from the
    motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the CMOS.
    Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the volatile CMOS
    settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.

    Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know if would
    install at all. Better to find some more memory to install. 72-pin SIMM
    memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched pairs of
    SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to use
    >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for passwords
    >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this computer
    >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing the
    >bios do this trick?)
    >
    >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
    >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when in
    >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to see
    >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try to
    >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    >
    >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test mode
    >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    >
    >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or the
    >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
    >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    >
    >LtoQ
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying to
    install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password situation
    would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.

    I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the other
    slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots of
    them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification on
    them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset) seemed to
    be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from sending
    ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.

    Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this probably
    happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?

    Licensed to Quill
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    > To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium battery from
    the
    > motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the CMOS.
    > Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the volatile
    CMOS
    > settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    >
    > Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know if
    would
    > install at all. Better to find some more memory to install. 72-pin SIMM
    > memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched pairs
    of
    > SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to
    use
    > >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    passwords
    > >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    computer
    > >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing
    the
    > >bios do this trick?)
    > >
    > >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
    > >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    > >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when
    in
    > >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    > >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to
    see
    > >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try
    to
    > >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > >
    > >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test
    mode
    > >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    > >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > >
    > >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or
    the
    > >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
    > >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    > >
    > >LtoQ
    > >
    > >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope for the
    best... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying to
    >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password situation
    >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    >
    >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the other
    >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots of
    >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification on
    >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset) seemed to
    >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from sending
    >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    >
    >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this probably
    >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    >
    >Licensed to Quill
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium battery from
    >the
    >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the CMOS.
    >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the volatile
    >CMOS
    >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    >>
    >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know if
    >would
    >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install. 72-pin SIMM
    >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched pairs
    >of
    >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to
    >use
    >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    >passwords
    >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    >computer
    >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing
    >the
    >> >bios do this trick?)
    >> >
    >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
    >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when
    >in
    >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to
    >see
    >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try
    >to
    >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    >> >
    >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test
    >mode
    >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    >> >
    >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or
    >the
    >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
    >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    >> >
    >> >LtoQ
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present more
    basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test screen
    whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make any
    difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the monitor
    which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you correct
    the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is turned
    on. Nothing I can do changes that.

    Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power doesnt
    change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages indicating
    that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its memory
    despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.

    I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has prevented
    the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the monitor
    started) so I am experimenting with
    http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.

    Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A and B
    bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it is
    enough to run Windows

    Many thanks again

    Licensed to Quill
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    > Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope for the
    > best... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying to
    > >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    > >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password situation
    > >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    > >
    > >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the
    other
    > >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots of
    > >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification on
    > >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset) seemed
    to
    > >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from
    sending
    > >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    > >
    > >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this probably
    > >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    > >
    > >Licensed to Quill
    > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    > >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium battery
    from
    > >the
    > >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the
    CMOS.
    > >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the volatile
    > >CMOS
    > >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    > >>
    > >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know if
    > >would
    > >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install. 72-pin
    SIMM
    > >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched
    pairs
    > >of
    > >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems
    to
    > >use
    > >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    > >passwords
    > >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    > >computer
    > >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing
    > >the
    > >> >bios do this trick?)
    > >> >
    > >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows
    (I
    > >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    > >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows
    when
    > >in
    > >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    > >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS
    to
    > >see
    > >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may
    try
    > >to
    > >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > >> >
    > >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in
    test
    > >mode
    > >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    > >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > >> >
    > >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode
    or
    > >the
    > >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    microswitch
    > >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    > >> >
    > >> >LtoQ
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    "Licensed to Quill" <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:cgjujp$s60$1@ngspool-d02.news.aol.com...
    > Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present more
    > basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test screen
    > whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make any
    > difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the monitor
    > which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you correct
    > the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is turned
    > on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    >
    > Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power
    > doesnt
    > change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages
    > indicating
    > that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its memory
    > despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    >
    > I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has
    > prevented
    > the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    > SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the monitor
    > started) so I am experimenting with
    > http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    >
    > Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A and
    > B
    > bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it is
    > enough to run Windows
    >
    > Many thanks again
    >
    > Licensed to Quill


    Take the battery completely out for say 5 minutes. Then place it back in and
    then turn the system on. It should display a system message about a low
    battery warning just keep going. (Or better yet this is the time to change
    to a fresh new battery)

    You also need to re-enter the BIOS (DEL, F2, CTL-ALT-DEL, or some other key
    combo to enter it.) Set the BIOS to default settings and then let the system
    boot up. This may also cure the monitor problem. Usually when that type of
    message occurs you either have a bad connection, a bad bios setting for the
    monitor, a bent power cable to the monitor, a bend or misaligned pin out
    from the monitor and there can be other reasons but I would check the
    obvious first. Also check to make sure the power supply is set to the
    correct voltage (110 or other settings for Europe) After the system is
    booted up and the bios is accepted you then add the memory as Ben advised.
    The more as he said the better.

    I hope I helped?

    Elector
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Perhaps I'm missing something in the translation here. "Test screen"? Is this
    the built-in electronic display shown by a monitor when it is not receiving a
    signal from the computer? If so, you are right. The test screen is evidence
    that the computer itself is not working properly. The problem may be more
    basic. If removing the battery does not clear the CMOS and enable you to see
    something (text, graphics, whatever) displayed from the computer, then the
    computer motherboard has a serious problem which is preventing it from even
    doing its initial Power On Self Test (POST). If this is the case, you'll need
    to go through a detailed step-by-step diagnostic procedure to determine why.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 02:04:33 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present more
    >basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test screen
    >whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make any
    >difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the monitor
    >which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you correct
    >the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is turned
    >on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    >
    >Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power doesnt
    >change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages indicating
    >that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its memory
    >despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    >
    >I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has prevented
    >the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    >SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the monitor
    >started) so I am experimenting with
    >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    >
    >Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A and B
    >bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it is
    >enough to run Windows
    >
    >Many thanks again
    >
    >Licensed to Quill
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    >> Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope for the
    >> best... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying to
    >> >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    >> >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password situation
    >> >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    >> >
    >> >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the
    >other
    >> >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots of
    >> >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification on
    >> >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset) seemed
    >to
    >> >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from
    >sending
    >> >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    >> >
    >> >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this probably
    >> >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    >> >
    >> >Licensed to Quill
    >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >> >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    >> >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium battery
    >from
    >> >the
    >> >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the
    >CMOS.
    >> >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the volatile
    >> >CMOS
    >> >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    >> >>
    >> >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know if
    >> >would
    >> >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install. 72-pin
    >SIMM
    >> >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched
    >pairs
    >> >of
    >> >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    >> >>
    >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems
    >to
    >> >use
    >> >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    >> >passwords
    >> >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    >> >computer
    >> >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing
    >> >the
    >> >> >bios do this trick?)
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows
    >(I
    >> >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    >> >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows
    >when
    >> >in
    >> >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    >> >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS
    >to
    >> >see
    >> >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may
    >try
    >> >to
    >> >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    >> >> >
    >> >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in
    >test
    >> >mode
    >> >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    >> >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode
    >or
    >> >the
    >> >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    >microswitch
    >> >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    >> >> >
    >> >> >LtoQ
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Yes, that sounds like it: Something is preventing a signal coming out of the
    computer but I strongly suspect that it is something to do with changing the
    memory as the unit would POST until I simply put a 32Meg EDO ram chip in it.
    THen I reverted to the original chip and nothing improved (this isn't a
    static electricity problem which caused the mobo to blow:Nor I suspect is is
    a gigantic coincidence that the mobo died exactly when I put more ram in
    it?).

    I found that by jumpering across J1F2A, pins 2 and 3 rather than 1 and 2 I
    could disable the password. The trouble is that there are about 4 sets of
    pins marked 1 and 2 as well as 2 and 3 on block J1F2A on the page
    http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm. (and doing what I thought was
    clearing the password and CMOS didn't have any effect on what did appear, -
    or in this case, didn't appear on the monitor)

    So I am wondering about jumpering to reset if taking the battery out didnt
    do anything. Do you happen to know which jumpers have to get set on that
    block? Is it NOT the top ones?

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:412dd81e.1818679@news.charter.net...
    > Perhaps I'm missing something in the translation here. "Test screen"? Is
    this
    > the built-in electronic display shown by a monitor when it is not
    receiving a
    > signal from the computer? If so, you are right. The test screen is
    evidence
    > that the computer itself is not working properly. The problem may be more
    > basic. If removing the battery does not clear the CMOS and enable you to
    see
    > something (text, graphics, whatever) displayed from the computer, then the
    > computer motherboard has a serious problem which is preventing it from
    even
    > doing its initial Power On Self Test (POST). If this is the case, you'll
    need
    > to go through a detailed step-by-step diagnostic procedure to determine
    why.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 02:04:33 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present
    more
    > >basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test screen
    > >whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make
    any
    > >difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the monitor
    > >which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you correct
    > >the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is turned
    > >on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    > >
    > >Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power
    doesnt
    > >change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages
    indicating
    > >that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its memory
    > >despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    > >
    > >I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has
    prevented
    > >the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    > >SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the
    monitor
    > >started) so I am experimenting with
    > >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    > >
    > >Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A and
    B
    > >bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it is
    > >enough to run Windows
    > >
    > >Many thanks again
    > >
    > >Licensed to Quill
    > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    > >> Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope for
    the
    > >> best... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying
    to
    > >> >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    > >> >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password
    situation
    > >> >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    > >> >
    > >> >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the
    > >other
    > >> >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots
    of
    > >> >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification
    on
    > >> >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset)
    seemed
    > >to
    > >> >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from
    > >sending
    > >> >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    > >> >
    > >> >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this
    probably
    > >> >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    > >> >
    > >> >Licensed to Quill
    > >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >> >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    > >> >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium
    battery
    > >from
    > >> >the
    > >> >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the
    > >CMOS.
    > >> >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the
    volatile
    > >> >CMOS
    > >> >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know
    if
    > >> >would
    > >> >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install.
    72-pin
    > >SIMM
    > >> >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched
    > >pairs
    > >> >of
    > >> >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    > >> >>
    > >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which
    seems
    > >to
    > >> >use
    > >> >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    > >> >passwords
    > >> >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    > >> >computer
    > >> >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then
    flashing
    > >> >the
    > >> >> >bios do this trick?)
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into
    windows
    > >(I
    > >> >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt
    be
    > >> >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into
    windows
    > >when
    > >> >in
    > >> >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off
    the
    > >> >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test
    SIMMS
    > >to
    > >> >see
    > >> >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I
    may
    > >try
    > >> >to
    > >> >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in
    > >test
    > >> >mode
    > >> >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    > >> >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test
    mode
    > >or
    > >> >the
    > >> >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    > >microswitch
    > >> >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >LtoQ
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Without specs for the motherboard, I am somewhat at a loss. The board is
    clearly made by Intel for PB, judging by the convention for naming the jumpers.
    Look closely at the markings on the board to see which is pin 1 on a group of
    pins.

    FYI, as stated on the PB web site, the board MUST have SIMMs installed in
    matched pairs. If you only put a single SIMM in, that is the cause of the
    non-boot problem. What happens if you revert back to the original PAIR of
    SIMMs.

    I probably have one of these 680 boards kicking around my warehouse, along with
    a few other odds and ends of boards for Pentium-class PB, IBM, and HP systems.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 18:58:19 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >Yes, that sounds like it: Something is preventing a signal coming out of the
    >computer but I strongly suspect that it is something to do with changing the
    >memory as the unit would POST until I simply put a 32Meg EDO ram chip in it.
    >THen I reverted to the original chip and nothing improved (this isn't a
    >static electricity problem which caused the mobo to blow:Nor I suspect is is
    >a gigantic coincidence that the mobo died exactly when I put more ram in
    >it?).
    >
    >I found that by jumpering across J1F2A, pins 2 and 3 rather than 1 and 2 I
    >could disable the password. The trouble is that there are about 4 sets of
    >pins marked 1 and 2 as well as 2 and 3 on block J1F2A on the page
    >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm. (and doing what I thought was
    >clearing the password and CMOS didn't have any effect on what did appear, -
    >or in this case, didn't appear on the monitor)
    >
    >So I am wondering about jumpering to reset if taking the battery out didnt
    >do anything. Do you happen to know which jumpers have to get set on that
    >block? Is it NOT the top ones?
    >
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:412dd81e.1818679@news.charter.net...
    >> Perhaps I'm missing something in the translation here. "Test screen"? Is
    >this
    >> the built-in electronic display shown by a monitor when it is not
    >receiving a
    >> signal from the computer? If so, you are right. The test screen is
    >evidence
    >> that the computer itself is not working properly. The problem may be more
    >> basic. If removing the battery does not clear the CMOS and enable you to
    >see
    >> something (text, graphics, whatever) displayed from the computer, then the
    >> computer motherboard has a serious problem which is preventing it from
    >even
    >> doing its initial Power On Self Test (POST). If this is the case, you'll
    >need
    >> to go through a detailed step-by-step diagnostic procedure to determine
    >why.
    >>
    >> ... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 02:04:33 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present
    >more
    >> >basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test screen
    >> >whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make
    >any
    >> >difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the monitor
    >> >which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you correct
    >> >the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is turned
    >> >on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    >> >
    >> >Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power
    >doesnt
    >> >change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages
    >indicating
    >> >that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its memory
    >> >despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    >> >
    >> >I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has
    >prevented
    >> >the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    >> >SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the
    >monitor
    >> >started) so I am experimenting with
    >> >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    >> >
    >> >Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A and
    >B
    >> >bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it is
    >> >enough to run Windows
    >> >
    >> >Many thanks again
    >> >
    >> >Licensed to Quill
    >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >> >news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    >> >> Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope for
    >the
    >> >> best... Ben Myers
    >> >>
    >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually trying
    >to
    >> >> >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    >> >> >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password
    >situation
    >> >> >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into the
    >> >other
    >> >> >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have lots
    >of
    >> >> >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no identification
    >on
    >> >> >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset)
    >seemed
    >> >to
    >> >> >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from
    >> >sending
    >> >> >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this
    >probably
    >> >> >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Licensed to Quill
    >> >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >> >> >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    >> >> >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium
    >battery
    >> >from
    >> >> >the
    >> >> >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset the
    >> >CMOS.
    >> >> >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the
    >volatile
    >> >> >CMOS
    >> >> >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't know
    >if
    >> >> >would
    >> >> >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install.
    >72-pin
    >> >SIMM
    >> >> >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept matched
    >> >pairs
    >> >> >of
    >> >> >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben Myers
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which
    >seems
    >> >to
    >> >> >use
    >> >> >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    >> >> >passwords
    >> >> >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    >> >> >computer
    >> >> >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then
    >flashing
    >> >> >the
    >> >> >> >bios do this trick?)
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into
    >windows
    >> >(I
    >> >> >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt
    >be
    >> >> >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into
    >windows
    >> >when
    >> >> >in
    >> >> >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off
    >the
    >> >> >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test
    >SIMMS
    >> >to
    >> >> >see
    >> >> >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I
    >may
    >> >try
    >> >> >to
    >> >> >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in
    >> >test
    >> >> >mode
    >> >> >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    >> >> >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test
    >mode
    >> >or
    >> >> >the
    >> >> >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    >> >microswitch
    >> >> >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >LtoQ
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Yes, I figured that and did try to revert to the pair of SIMMS even if I did
    actually put a single 32 MEG EDO ram:WHen it wouldnt POST, (after wrongly
    trying another single SIMM) that was the first thing I tried. WHenever I
    try a different SIMM configuration, it gives three beeps but at no stage has
    it given me any output whatsoever from the SVGA output.

    The block itself is interesting and the lack of a convention for properly
    numbering the block is part of the problem, unless what I think is obvoius
    is really obvious (and the problem is elsewhere). It has the J1F2A
    identification marking ACROSS the very top, - I thought indicating that the
    top few pins were the J1F2A pins. But there are about four sets of pins on
    this single block with mysterious un-described identification markings on
    the right side of each set. So I thought I could merely use the top ones,
    trying jumpering (both to get the password cleared AND to get the CMOS
    reset) them with the battery in, with the battery out, with the power
    connected, with the power disconnected. Nothing causes the CMOS to reset. I
    am wondering if I shoudl try to flash the BIOS (assuming there is a newer
    version out there, or possibly that it might let me flash even if there
    isn't a newer BIOS than the one installed).

    The manual says that installing a new video card disables all video
    functions of the motherboard which I suppose might assist something? I have
    unfortunately got about five newer video cards in my New York office but
    none in London so I can't discount the slight possibility that there is a
    bad connection in the video card or something else wrong with the video area
    caused by moving the computer to pop the top off the unit. there dont SEEM
    to be any switches in the unit which would prevent the unit from POSTing if
    the cover is off it. The connector is pretty well screwed into the plug
    hole so I don't think that there are any problems with the connector or with
    pins mysteriously getting disconnected (a problem I have had before when I
    didnt screw in the screws in the plug)

    Licensed to Quill
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:412e735a.8462702@news.charter.net...
    > Without specs for the motherboard, I am somewhat at a loss. The board is
    > clearly made by Intel for PB, judging by the convention for naming the
    jumpers.
    > Look closely at the markings on the board to see which is pin 1 on a group
    of
    > pins.
    >
    > FYI, as stated on the PB web site, the board MUST have SIMMs installed in
    > matched pairs. If you only put a single SIMM in, that is the cause of the
    > non-boot problem. What happens if you revert back to the original PAIR of
    > SIMMs.
    >
    > I probably have one of these 680 boards kicking around my warehouse, along
    with
    > a few other odds and ends of boards for Pentium-class PB, IBM, and HP
    systems.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 18:58:19 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Yes, that sounds like it: Something is preventing a signal coming out of
    the
    > >computer but I strongly suspect that it is something to do with changing
    the
    > >memory as the unit would POST until I simply put a 32Meg EDO ram chip in
    it.
    > >THen I reverted to the original chip and nothing improved (this isn't a
    > >static electricity problem which caused the mobo to blow:Nor I suspect is
    is
    > >a gigantic coincidence that the mobo died exactly when I put more ram in
    > >it?).
    > >
    > >I found that by jumpering across J1F2A, pins 2 and 3 rather than 1 and 2
    I
    > >could disable the password. The trouble is that there are about 4 sets of
    > >pins marked 1 and 2 as well as 2 and 3 on block J1F2A on the page
    > >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm. (and doing what I thought was
    > >clearing the password and CMOS didn't have any effect on what did
    appear, -
    > >or in this case, didn't appear on the monitor)
    > >
    > >So I am wondering about jumpering to reset if taking the battery out
    didnt
    > >do anything. Do you happen to know which jumpers have to get set on that
    > >block? Is it NOT the top ones?
    > >
    > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >news:412dd81e.1818679@news.charter.net...
    > >> Perhaps I'm missing something in the translation here. "Test screen"?
    Is
    > >this
    > >> the built-in electronic display shown by a monitor when it is not
    > >receiving a
    > >> signal from the computer? If so, you are right. The test screen is
    > >evidence
    > >> that the computer itself is not working properly. The problem may be
    more
    > >> basic. If removing the battery does not clear the CMOS and enable you
    to
    > >see
    > >> something (text, graphics, whatever) displayed from the computer, then
    the
    > >> computer motherboard has a serious problem which is preventing it from
    > >even
    > >> doing its initial Power On Self Test (POST). If this is the case,
    you'll
    > >need
    > >> to go through a detailed step-by-step diagnostic procedure to determine
    > >why.
    > >>
    > >> ... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 02:04:33 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at present
    > >more
    > >> >basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test
    screen
    > >> >whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt make
    > >any
    > >> >difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the
    monitor
    > >> >which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you
    correct
    > >> >the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is
    turned
    > >> >on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    > >> >
    > >> >Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power
    > >doesnt
    > >> >change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages
    > >indicating
    > >> >that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its
    memory
    > >> >despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    > >> >
    > >> >I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has
    > >prevented
    > >> >the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me a
    > >> >SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the
    > >monitor
    > >> >started) so I am experimenting with
    > >> >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    > >> >
    > >> >Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the A
    and
    > >B
    > >> >bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if it
    is
    > >> >enough to run Windows
    > >> >
    > >> >Many thanks again
    > >> >
    > >> >Licensed to Quill
    > >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >> >news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    > >> >> Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope
    for
    > >the
    > >> >> best... Ben Myers
    > >> >>
    > >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually
    trying
    > >to
    > >> >> >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    > >> >> >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password
    > >situation
    > >> >> >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into
    the
    > >> >other
    > >> >> >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have
    lots
    > >of
    > >> >> >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no
    identification
    > >on
    > >> >> >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset)
    > >seemed
    > >> >to
    > >> >> >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer from
    > >> >sending
    > >> >> >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this
    > >probably
    > >> >> >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Licensed to Quill
    > >> >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >> >> >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    > >> >> >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium
    > >battery
    > >> >from
    > >> >> >the
    > >> >> >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to reset
    the
    > >> >CMOS.
    > >> >> >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the
    > >volatile
    > >> >> >CMOS
    > >> >> >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't
    know
    > >if
    > >> >> >would
    > >> >> >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install.
    > >72-pin
    > >> >SIMM
    > >> >> >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept
    matched
    > >> >pairs
    > >> >> >of
    > >> >> >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben
    Myers
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which
    > >seems
    > >> >to
    > >> >> >use
    > >> >> >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    > >> >> >passwords
    > >> >> >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of
    this
    > >> >> >computer
    > >> >> >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then
    > >flashing
    > >> >> >the
    > >> >> >> >bios do this trick?)
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into
    > >windows
    > >> >(I
    > >> >> >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it
    shouldnt
    > >be
    > >> >> >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into
    > >windows
    > >> >when
    > >> >> >in
    > >> >> >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn
    off
    > >the
    > >> >> >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test
    > >SIMMS
    > >> >to
    > >> >> >see
    > >> >> >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later
    I
    > >may
    > >> >try
    > >> >> >to
    > >> >> >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor
    in
    > >> >test
    > >> >> >mode
    > >> >> >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre
    it
    > >> >> >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test
    > >mode
    > >> >or
    > >> >> >the
    > >> >> >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    > >> >microswitch
    > >> >> >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >LtoQ
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    The PB680 motherboard is an Intel-made NV430VX, for which technical specs may
    still be available on the Intel web site. If it is still there, it would be in
    the archive of documents for older motherboards. The Intel web site is pretty
    easy to navigate.

    From the tech spec:

    The three beeps when the system powers up indicate a "Base 64K memory failure",
    or failure of memory in the low 64K of memory to work properly. In short, you
    have installed SIMM memory which is incompatible with the motherboard (e.g. not
    a matched pair or too slow for the system) or simply defective. It is possible
    that the memory is not inserted correctly in the SIMM sockets, which would make
    for a defective installation of memory.

    The configuration jumpers at J1F2 are arranged in four groups of 6 pins each,
    and labelled A, B, C, & D. Pin 1 of J1F2-A is the right most pin nearest to you
    if you are looking inside the chassis from the front.

    J1F2-A with pins 4-5 jumpered keep the motherboard CMOS settings as they are,
    whilst pins 5-6 clears CMOS.
    J1F2-A pins 1-2 enable a BIOS password, to be avoided. Pins 2-3 clear any BIOS
    password and disable its use in the BIOS.

    You should not have changed ANY other jumpers in the J1F2 group or the jumpers
    at J9A1 without access to the complete technical spec and a decent understanding
    of what these jumpers do.

    In short, you may well have installed defective memory or installed it
    improperly to begin with. In so doing, you may also have damaged the
    motherboard in some way. Time will tell. Go back to the original memory
    configuration, installing pairs of SIMMs in adjacent SIMM sockets. Each pair of
    adjacent SIMM sockets is called a "bank". The board will operate properly if a
    matched pair of SIMMs is installed in EITHER bank. Try a pair in each bank and
    see what happens... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to use
    >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for passwords
    >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this computer
    >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing the
    >bios do this trick?)
    >
    >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
    >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when in
    >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to see
    >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try to
    >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    >
    >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test mode
    >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    >
    >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or the
    >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
    >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    >
    >LtoQ
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Many thanks for your help although we are going around in circles a bit at
    this stage: When you say "Go back to the original memory
    configuration, installing pairs of SIMMs in adjacent SIMM sockets" it really
    only repeats what I said in the message to which it was a response when I
    said "revert to the [original] pair of SIMMS ........ was the first thing I
    tried" I posted at that stage because I was baffled that it didnt restore
    the signal bein gsent to the screen and wondered if this was anything to do
    with the error message telling me that the system had been halted because I
    had entered the incorrect password three times. But surely clearing the
    password and reinstalling the original SIMMS would clear this problem and
    restore SOMTHING to the screen? It seems there is nothing now to stop the
    system POSTing?

    I didnt dare change anything else on that block but did try to clear the
    password AND reset the CMOS in the way you say. But all I am getting is
    nothing being sent to the monitor by the computer. I will try the same
    procedure again, AND try taking out the battery again with the power
    disconnected again as well as with the power connected and see what happens.


    "Licensed to Quill" <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:cgmos3$hdi$1@ngspool-d02.news.aol.com...
    > Yes, I figured that and did try to revert to the pair of SIMMS even if I
    did
    > actually put a single 32 MEG EDO ram:WHen it wouldnt POST, (after wrongly
    > trying another single SIMM) that was the first thing I tried. WHenever I
    > try a different SIMM configuration, it gives three beeps but at no stage
    has
    > it given me any output whatsoever from the SVGA output.
    >
    > The block itself is interesting and the lack of a convention for properly
    > numbering the block is part of the problem, unless what I think is obvoius
    > is really obvious (and the problem is elsewhere). It has the J1F2A
    > identification marking ACROSS the very top, - I thought indicating that
    the
    > top few pins were the J1F2A pins. But there are about four sets of pins
    on
    > this single block with mysterious un-described identification markings on
    > the right side of each set. So I thought I could merely use the top ones,
    > trying jumpering (both to get the password cleared AND to get the CMOS
    > reset) them with the battery in, with the battery out, with the power
    > connected, with the power disconnected. Nothing causes the CMOS to reset.
    I
    > am wondering if I shoudl try to flash the BIOS (assuming there is a newer
    > version out there, or possibly that it might let me flash even if there
    > isn't a newer BIOS than the one installed).
    >
    > The manual says that installing a new video card disables all video
    > functions of the motherboard which I suppose might assist something? I
    have
    > unfortunately got about five newer video cards in my New York office but
    > none in London so I can't discount the slight possibility that there is a
    > bad connection in the video card or something else wrong with the video
    area
    > caused by moving the computer to pop the top off the unit. there dont
    SEEM
    > to be any switches in the unit which would prevent the unit from POSTing
    if
    > the cover is off it. The connector is pretty well screwed into the plug
    > hole so I don't think that there are any problems with the connector or
    with
    > pins mysteriously getting disconnected (a problem I have had before when I
    > didnt screw in the screws in the plug)
    >
    > Licensed to Quill
    > <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > news:412e735a.8462702@news.charter.net...
    > > Without specs for the motherboard, I am somewhat at a loss. The board
    is
    > > clearly made by Intel for PB, judging by the convention for naming the
    > jumpers.
    > > Look closely at the markings on the board to see which is pin 1 on a
    group
    > of
    > > pins.
    > >
    > > FYI, as stated on the PB web site, the board MUST have SIMMs installed
    in
    > > matched pairs. If you only put a single SIMM in, that is the cause of
    the
    > > non-boot problem. What happens if you revert back to the original PAIR
    of
    > > SIMMs.
    > >
    > > I probably have one of these 680 boards kicking around my warehouse,
    along
    > with
    > > a few other odds and ends of boards for Pentium-class PB, IBM, and HP
    > systems.
    > >
    > > ... Ben Myers
    > >
    > > On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 18:58:19 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Yes, that sounds like it: Something is preventing a signal coming out
    of
    > the
    > > >computer but I strongly suspect that it is something to do with
    changing
    > the
    > > >memory as the unit would POST until I simply put a 32Meg EDO ram chip
    in
    > it.
    > > >THen I reverted to the original chip and nothing improved (this isn't a
    > > >static electricity problem which caused the mobo to blow:Nor I suspect
    is
    > is
    > > >a gigantic coincidence that the mobo died exactly when I put more ram
    in
    > > >it?).
    > > >
    > > >I found that by jumpering across J1F2A, pins 2 and 3 rather than 1 and
    2
    > I
    > > >could disable the password. The trouble is that there are about 4 sets
    of
    > > >pins marked 1 and 2 as well as 2 and 3 on block J1F2A on the page
    > > >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm. (and doing what I thought
    was
    > > >clearing the password and CMOS didn't have any effect on what did
    > appear, -
    > > >or in this case, didn't appear on the monitor)
    > > >
    > > >So I am wondering about jumpering to reset if taking the battery out
    > didnt
    > > >do anything. Do you happen to know which jumpers have to get set on
    that
    > > >block? Is it NOT the top ones?
    > > >
    > > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > > >news:412dd81e.1818679@news.charter.net...
    > > >> Perhaps I'm missing something in the translation here. "Test
    screen"?
    > Is
    > > >this
    > > >> the built-in electronic display shown by a monitor when it is not
    > > >receiving a
    > > >> signal from the computer? If so, you are right. The test screen is
    > > >evidence
    > > >> that the computer itself is not working properly. The problem may be
    > more
    > > >> basic. If removing the battery does not clear the CMOS and enable
    you
    > to
    > > >see
    > > >> something (text, graphics, whatever) displayed from the computer,
    then
    > the
    > > >> computer motherboard has a serious problem which is preventing it
    from
    > > >even
    > > >> doing its initial Power On Self Test (POST). If this is the case,
    > you'll
    > > >need
    > > >> to go through a detailed step-by-step diagnostic procedure to
    determine
    > > >why.
    > > >>
    > > >> ... Ben Myers
    > > >>
    > > >> On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 02:04:33 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > > >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >> >Thank you for your response Ben but I think the problem is at
    present
    > > >more
    > > >> >basic than that: When I turn the monitor on, it gives me the test
    > screen
    > > >> >whether the computer is on or not. Turning the computer on doesnt
    make
    > > >any
    > > >> >difference: You just don't nsee any signal being accepted by the
    > monitor
    > > >> >which (as I say) seems to be in some sort of test mode to let you
    > correct
    > > >> >the positioning of the picture on the screen from the moment it is
    > turned
    > > >> >on. Nothing I can do changes that.
    > > >> >
    > > >> >Taking the battery our for a few minutes and disconnecting the power
    > > >doesnt
    > > >> >change this either AND I didnt get any invalid checksum messages
    > > >indicating
    > > >> >that the battery hadn't enough power in it to hold its data in its
    > memory
    > > >> >despite this computer having been unplugged for a year and a half.
    > > >> >
    > > >> >I am wondering if the failure to enter a password three times has
    > > >prevented
    > > >> >the computer from sending any signal to the monitor? (It did give me
    a
    > > >> >SYSTEM STOPPED message which SEEMS to be when the problem with the
    > > >monitor
    > > >> >started) so I am experimenting with
    > > >> >http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/680.htm.
    > > >> >
    > > >> >Then I will experiment with putting two similar 32 meg chips in the
    A
    > and
    > > >B
    > > >> >bank slots and two similar 8 Meg SIMMS in slots C and D and see if
    it
    > is
    > > >> >enough to run Windows
    > > >> >
    > > >> >Many thanks again
    > > >> >
    > > >> >Licensed to Quill
    > > >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > > >> >news:412d2abc.13905950@news.charter.net...
    > > >> >> Remove the battery or set the jumpers to clear the CMOS, and hope
    > for
    > > >the
    > > >> >> best... Ben Myers
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 17:43:27 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > > >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >> >Many thanks Ben: That was what I needed to know: I was actually
    > trying
    > > >to
    > > >> >> >install some 32 MEG simms when the computer (meaning the monitor)
    > > >> >> >mysteriously went into test mode and I wondered if the password
    > > >situation
    > > >> >> >would be impeding it from going back into normal mode.
    > > >> >> >
    > > >> >> >I thought I could put two 32 Meg simms in and a few 16 Simms into
    > the
    > > >> >other
    > > >> >> >slots if I couldn't find any more 32s in my SIMM stock. (I have
    > lots
    > > >of
    > > >> >> >them but most of them are probably 8 Meg ones with no
    > identification
    > > >on
    > > >> >> >them) But as I say, the password (which sometimes cant be reset)
    > > >seemed
    > > >> >to
    > > >> >> >be preventing me from doing anything and stopping the computer
    from
    > > >> >sending
    > > >> >> >ANYTHING to the monitor keeping it in what looks like test mode.
    > > >> >> >
    > > >> >> >Would you happen to know how I get out of test mode or will this
    > > >probably
    > > >> >> >happen when I remove the battery or jumper it to reset?
    > > >> >> >
    > > >> >> >Licensed to Quill
    > > >> >> ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in
    message
    > > >> >> >news:412ce3ac.20265862@news.charter.net...
    > > >> >> >> To remove a BIOS password, either remove the C2032 3v lithium
    > > >battery
    > > >> >from
    > > >> >> >the
    > > >> >> >> motherboard for a while, or find the motherboard jumper to
    reset
    > the
    > > >> >CMOS.
    > > >> >> >> Either one will remove the BIOS password by simply causing the
    > > >volatile
    > > >> >> >CMOS
    > > >> >> >> settings to lose their charge and become corrupted.
    > > >> >> >>
    > > >> >> >> Windows 95 will barely run at all in 16MB of memory. I don't
    > know
    > > >if
    > > >> >> >would
    > > >> >> >> install at all. Better to find some more memory to install.
    > > >72-pin
    > > >> >SIMM
    > > >> >> >> memory is dirt cheap now. The 680 motherboard will accept
    > matched
    > > >> >pairs
    > > >> >> >of
    > > >> >> >> SIMMs in 4, 8, 16, and 32MB capacities. More is better... Ben
    > Myers
    > > >> >> >>
    > > >> >> >> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > > >> >> >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > > >> >> >>
    > > >> >> >> >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which
    > > >seems
    > > >> >to
    > > >> >> >use
    > > >> >> >> >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me
    for
    > > >> >> >passwords
    > > >> >> >> >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of
    > this
    > > >> >> >computer
    > > >> >> >> >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then
    > > >flashing
    > > >> >> >the
    > > >> >> >> >bios do this trick?)
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >> >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into
    > > >windows
    > > >> >(I
    > > >> >> >> >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it
    > shouldnt
    > > >be
    > > >> >> >> >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into
    > > >windows
    > > >> >when
    > > >> >> >in
    > > >> >> >> >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn
    > off
    > > >the
    > > >> >> >> >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test
    > > >SIMMS
    > > >> >to
    > > >> >> >see
    > > >> >> >> >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory.
    Later
    > I
    > > >may
    > > >> >try
    > > >> >> >to
    > > >> >> >> >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >> >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the
    monitor
    > in
    > > >> >test
    > > >> >> >mode
    > > >> >> >> >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to
    centre
    > it
    > > >> >> >> >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >> >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of
    test
    > > >mode
    > > >> >or
    > > >> >> >the
    > > >> >> >> >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a
    > > >> >microswitch
    > > >> >> >> >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't
    see?
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >> >LtoQ
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >> >
    > > >> >> >>
    > > >> >> >
    > > >> >> >
    > > >> >>
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Hi Ben

    You were right: Where it says the identification of the block ISN'T the
    place where you set the CMOS. That is bank D and when I set bank A as you
    suggested, all started coming alive.

    But curiously the original memory still gives three beeps. So I took it out
    and put in two 32 meg EDO chips which resulted in a proper boot. So I put in
    the two original 8 meg chips (at least I thought they were 8 meg SIMMS as
    they registered 16 Meg when I originally started the system and now hey
    presto!! it reads 32 Meg.

    Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in there
    but which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE in?
    Is this something to do with the other B C or D blocks which make it read
    the memory slots properly?

    Could it be something to do with flahsing the BIOS? The trouble is that the
    BIOS in there is an Amibios 1.00.11DNOR whereas the serial number identifies
    it as a Pulsar 19 and any Pulsar According to the PB site
    http://support.packardbell.com/uk/mypc/index.php?PibItemNr=platform_symphonymultimedia&PibLinkGroup=2000#show
    should have an Apollo, or a Luna or a Bora Pro or some Athena or Phoenix
    BIOS??

    Do you think I can replace my AMI with one of these to cure these problems?
    Sounds like an incredibly risky stratiegy to me as you can't back up a BIOS
    and reinstall it??

    Licensed to Quill
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:412f2613.3136535@news.charter.net...
    > The PB680 motherboard is an Intel-made NV430VX, for which technical specs
    may
    > still be available on the Intel web site. If it is still there, it would
    be in
    > the archive of documents for older motherboards. The Intel web site is
    pretty
    > easy to navigate.
    >
    > From the tech spec:
    >
    > The three beeps when the system powers up indicate a "Base 64K memory
    failure",
    > or failure of memory in the low 64K of memory to work properly. In short,
    you
    > have installed SIMM memory which is incompatible with the motherboard
    (e.g. not
    > a matched pair or too slow for the system) or simply defective. It is
    possible
    > that the memory is not inserted correctly in the SIMM sockets, which would
    make
    > for a defective installation of memory.
    >
    > The configuration jumpers at J1F2 are arranged in four groups of 6 pins
    each,
    > and labelled A, B, C, & D. Pin 1 of J1F2-A is the right most pin nearest
    to you
    > if you are looking inside the chassis from the front.
    >
    > J1F2-A with pins 4-5 jumpered keep the motherboard CMOS settings as they
    are,
    > whilst pins 5-6 clears CMOS.
    > J1F2-A pins 1-2 enable a BIOS password, to be avoided. Pins 2-3 clear any
    BIOS
    > password and disable its use in the BIOS.
    >
    > You should not have changed ANY other jumpers in the J1F2 group or the
    jumpers
    > at J9A1 without access to the complete technical spec and a decent
    understanding
    > of what these jumpers do.
    >
    > In short, you may well have installed defective memory or installed it
    > improperly to begin with. In so doing, you may also have damaged the
    > motherboard in some way. Time will tell. Go back to the original memory
    > configuration, installing pairs of SIMMs in adjacent SIMM sockets. Each
    pair of
    > adjacent SIMM sockets is called a "bank". The board will operate properly
    if a
    > matched pair of SIMMs is installed in EITHER bank. Try a pair in each
    bank and
    > see what happens... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 12:47:25 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a Pulsar (I think it is an S?)called a multimedia which seems to
    use
    > >a 680 motherboard. I was testing it and it started asking me for
    passwords
    > >which I dont know: Does anyone know how I get into the BIOS of this
    computer
    > >without knowing the password? (or would downloading and then flashing
    the
    > >bios do this trick?)
    > >
    > >Then it started not seeming to mind this but wouldnt go into windows (I
    > >know that there is only 16 Meg RAM in this computer but it shouldnt be
    > >making the computer continuously LOOK as if it is going into windows when
    in
    > >reality it is only preparing to tell me that it is OK to turn off the
    > >computer now). All I am trying to do at this stage is to test SIMMS to
    see
    > >which ones it will take and thereby increase the memory. Later I may try
    to
    > >put another drive in it as a slave and put the swap file on it
    > >
    > >So I took the top off and suddenly it will only put the monitor in test
    mode
    > >in which I can move a black and white screen around, - to centre it
    > >properly, - but no signal seems to get sent to the monitor.
    > >
    > >Does anyone also know how to get either the monitor out of test mode or
    the
    > >computer to start sending a signal to the monitor? IS there a microswitch
    > >somethere between the cover and the computer which I can't see?
    > >
    > >LtoQ
    > >
    > >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    "Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in there but
    which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE in?" Not
    sure if you mis-stated with THREE SIMMS, but the motherboard works only with
    matched pairs of SIMMs. That is a rule almost inviolate with Pentium class
    motherboards and 72-pin SIMMs.

    Don't flash the BIOS. Your motherboard has the latest and last BIOS. Altho
    I've flashed the BIOS in maybe thousands of motherboards over the years, I still
    think it is a risky procedure. Perhaps more risky for you than for me.

    Packard Bell was notoriously sloppy with its bill-of-materials in the assembly
    of computers, and also with the myriad of names on the front, Pulsars, Legends,
    etc. It is no wonder that there is conflicting information about the
    motherboard inside your system. Ignore what you see elsewhere. You KNOW what
    you've got there, very pragmatically.

    FInally, download the spec for the motherboard. It has good solid detailed
    inforamtion, a hallmark of Intel-designed motherboards... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:27:29 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >Hi Ben
    >
    >You were right: Where it says the identification of the block ISN'T the
    >place where you set the CMOS. That is bank D and when I set bank A as you
    >suggested, all started coming alive.
    >
    >But curiously the original memory still gives three beeps. So I took it out
    >and put in two 32 meg EDO chips which resulted in a proper boot. So I put in
    >the two original 8 meg chips (at least I thought they were 8 meg SIMMS as
    >they registered 16 Meg when I originally started the system and now hey
    >presto!! it reads 32 Meg.
    >
    >Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in there
    >but which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE in?
    >Is this something to do with the other B C or D blocks which make it read
    >the memory slots properly?
    >
    >Could it be something to do with flahsing the BIOS? The trouble is that the
    >BIOS in there is an Amibios 1.00.11DNOR whereas the serial number identifies
    >it as a Pulsar 19 and any Pulsar According to the PB site
    >http://support.packardbell.com/uk/mypc/index.php?PibItemNr=platform_symphonymultimedia&PibLinkGroup=2000#show
    >should have an Apollo, or a Luna or a Bora Pro or some Athena or Phoenix
    >BIOS??
    >
    >Do you think I can replace my AMI with one of these to cure these problems?
    >Sounds like an incredibly risky stratiegy to me as you can't back up a BIOS
    >and reinstall it??
    >
    >Licensed to Quill
    >
    <SNIP!>
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    OK I will download the spec from the Intel site as there doesn't seem to be
    sufficient detail on the PB site which I mentioned. And if the BIOS is the
    latest, there must be some other reason for the system not seeing the memory
    which SEEMS to be inserted properly in the slots (and if it wasnt, surely I
    would hear beeps??)

    WHat is peculiar is that everyone seems to think that a 233 MHZ can't EASILY
    be put in a PB 680 mother board.

    There is something else wrong in that when (even identifying only 16 Meg of
    memory) the unit tries to get into Windows it starts giving error messages
    telling me that it cant find certain files it needs to start windows and I
    need to reinstall windows. WHich I dont necessarily believe but wonder if
    there is any program I can use to correct this? If I can get into windows,
    perhaps I can see howmuch memory is installed

    I also have a drive with a working windows installation which works iwth a
    Dell Dimension XPa 233 which wont even start or bring up an initial windows
    splash screen on this PB. The drive works unbelievably slowly and I cant
    beleive all this results from installation with a wrong chipset

    BW
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:413132d3.11004699@news.charter.net...
    > "Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    there but
    > which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE in?"
    Not
    > sure if you mis-stated with THREE SIMMS, but the motherboard works only
    with
    > matched pairs of SIMMs. That is a rule almost inviolate with Pentium
    class
    > motherboards and 72-pin SIMMs.
    >
    > Don't flash the BIOS. Your motherboard has the latest and last BIOS.
    Altho
    > I've flashed the BIOS in maybe thousands of motherboards over the years, I
    still
    > think it is a risky procedure. Perhaps more risky for you than for me.
    >
    > Packard Bell was notoriously sloppy with its bill-of-materials in the
    assembly
    > of computers, and also with the myriad of names on the front, Pulsars,
    Legends,
    > etc. It is no wonder that there is conflicting information about the
    > motherboard inside your system. Ignore what you see elsewhere. You KNOW
    what
    > you've got there, very pragmatically.
    >
    > FInally, download the spec for the motherboard. It has good solid
    detailed
    > inforamtion, a hallmark of Intel-designed motherboards... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:27:29 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi Ben
    > >
    > >You were right: Where it says the identification of the block ISN'T the
    > >place where you set the CMOS. That is bank D and when I set bank A as you
    > >suggested, all started coming alive.
    > >
    > >But curiously the original memory still gives three beeps. So I took it
    out
    > >and put in two 32 meg EDO chips which resulted in a proper boot. So I put
    in
    > >the two original 8 meg chips (at least I thought they were 8 meg SIMMS as
    > >they registered 16 Meg when I originally started the system and now hey
    > >presto!! it reads 32 Meg.
    > >
    > >Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    there
    > >but which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE
    in?
    > >Is this something to do with the other B C or D blocks which make it read
    > >the memory slots properly?
    > >
    > >Could it be something to do with flahsing the BIOS? The trouble is that
    the
    > >BIOS in there is an Amibios 1.00.11DNOR whereas the serial number
    identifies
    > >it as a Pulsar 19 and any Pulsar According to the PB site
    >
    >http://support.packardbell.com/uk/mypc/index.php?PibItemNr=platform_symphon
    ymultimedia&PibLinkGroup=2000#show
    > >should have an Apollo, or a Luna or a Bora Pro or some Athena or Phoenix
    > >BIOS??
    > >
    > >Do you think I can replace my AMI with one of these to cure these
    problems?
    > >Sounds like an incredibly risky stratiegy to me as you can't back up a
    BIOS
    > >and reinstall it??
    > >
    > >Licensed to Quill
    > >
    > <SNIP!>
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    The Intel spec for the NV430VX states that the board supports the Pentium MMX
    processors. To install a 233MHz MMX and get it to run at its rated speed,
    simply set the jumpers as tho the CPU was a 100MHz classic Pentium. This may
    sound strange, but, trust me, it works.

    If the system is not seeing the proper amount of memory, a BIOS update will not
    change this one whit. If it is not seeing the right amount of memory, either
    the memory is defective, or one or more SIMM sockets are defective or dirty, or
    the memory is does not meet the requirements of the motherboard.

    If the memory is somehow incorrect for the motherboard, all manner of error
    messages and failures can ensue. Get the memory right, then worry about the
    rest, including another CPU. Download MEMTEST-86 from the memtest web site, and
    run MEMTEST-86 to ensure that the memory setup is OK. MEMTEST-86 is perhaps the
    best all-round memory diagnostic, and it is a free download. If the computer
    runs several complete cycles of memory tests with MEMTEST-86, then the memory is
    OK. One error as indicated by MEMTEST-86 implies that the memory is not right
    for the computer... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 05:15:12 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:

    >OK I will download the spec from the Intel site as there doesn't seem to be
    >sufficient detail on the PB site which I mentioned. And if the BIOS is the
    >latest, there must be some other reason for the system not seeing the memory
    >which SEEMS to be inserted properly in the slots (and if it wasnt, surely I
    >would hear beeps??)
    >
    >WHat is peculiar is that everyone seems to think that a 233 MHZ can't EASILY
    >be put in a PB 680 mother board.
    >
    >There is something else wrong in that when (even identifying only 16 Meg of
    >memory) the unit tries to get into Windows it starts giving error messages
    >telling me that it cant find certain files it needs to start windows and I
    >need to reinstall windows. WHich I dont necessarily believe but wonder if
    >there is any program I can use to correct this? If I can get into windows,
    >perhaps I can see howmuch memory is installed
    >
    >I also have a drive with a working windows installation which works iwth a
    >Dell Dimension XPa 233 which wont even start or bring up an initial windows
    >splash screen on this PB. The drive works unbelievably slowly and I cant
    >beleive all this results from installation with a wrong chipset
    >
    >BW
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:413132d3.11004699@news.charter.net...
    >> "Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    >there but
    >> which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE in?"
    >Not
    >> sure if you mis-stated with THREE SIMMS, but the motherboard works only
    >with
    >> matched pairs of SIMMs. That is a rule almost inviolate with Pentium
    >class
    >> motherboards and 72-pin SIMMs.
    >>
    >> Don't flash the BIOS. Your motherboard has the latest and last BIOS.
    >Altho
    >> I've flashed the BIOS in maybe thousands of motherboards over the years, I
    >still
    >> think it is a risky procedure. Perhaps more risky for you than for me.
    >>
    >> Packard Bell was notoriously sloppy with its bill-of-materials in the
    >assembly
    >> of computers, and also with the myriad of names on the front, Pulsars,
    >Legends,
    >> etc. It is no wonder that there is conflicting information about the
    >> motherboard inside your system. Ignore what you see elsewhere. You KNOW
    >what
    >> you've got there, very pragmatically.
    >>
    >> FInally, download the spec for the motherboard. It has good solid
    >detailed
    >> inforamtion, a hallmark of Intel-designed motherboards... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:27:29 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hi Ben
    >> >
    >> >You were right: Where it says the identification of the block ISN'T the
    >> >place where you set the CMOS. That is bank D and when I set bank A as you
    >> >suggested, all started coming alive.
    >> >
    >> >But curiously the original memory still gives three beeps. So I took it
    >out
    >> >and put in two 32 meg EDO chips which resulted in a proper boot. So I put
    >in
    >> >the two original 8 meg chips (at least I thought they were 8 meg SIMMS as
    >> >they registered 16 Meg when I originally started the system and now hey
    >> >presto!! it reads 32 Meg.
    >> >
    >> >Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    >there
    >> >but which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE
    >in?
    >> >Is this something to do with the other B C or D blocks which make it read
    >> >the memory slots properly?
    >> >
    >> >Could it be something to do with flahsing the BIOS? The trouble is that
    >the
    >> >BIOS in there is an Amibios 1.00.11DNOR whereas the serial number
    >identifies
    >> >it as a Pulsar 19 and any Pulsar According to the PB site
    >>
    >>http://support.packardbell.com/uk/mypc/index.php?PibItemNr=platform_symphon
    >ymultimedia&PibLinkGroup=2000#show
    >> >should have an Apollo, or a Luna or a Bora Pro or some Athena or Phoenix
    >> >BIOS??
    >> >
    >> >Do you think I can replace my AMI with one of these to cure these
    >problems?
    >> >Sounds like an incredibly risky stratiegy to me as you can't back up a
    >BIOS
    >> >and reinstall it??
    >> >
    >> >Licensed to Quill
    >> >
    >> <SNIP!>
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Hi Ben

    That sounds like the cure to me: It does now seem to me that what must have
    happened was that this 16 meg of memory just died when I took it out and the
    two simms marked 32 meg are only 32 qwhen put in two slots to form a bank:
    IE they are 16 each but presumably if I can run a test from DOS, it will
    confirm that.

    I wasnt suggesting that this chip cant be a 233, all I was thinking was that
    everyone who has posted whose posts were seen on google suggested that it
    was very difficult ot put a 233 in this board. Certainly not without some
    sort of special fan which this one doesn't seem to be. Clealry I would
    prefer a 233 to a 200 and to me, the difference doesnt sound too great to
    represent any element of overloading the mobo or overclocking. Unless there
    is some problem with the mobo and this chip, I dont see a 233mmx that as
    being much different from a 200 mmx altough I DO (from remember when I was
    waiting for my first Dell Inspiron 3000) the first Pentium 11s being 233 as
    well as the last Pentium 1s being overclockable to 233

    MFS

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:4132a5e9.2069255@news.charter.net...
    > The Intel spec for the NV430VX states that the board supports the Pentium
    MMX
    > processors. To install a 233MHz MMX and get it to run at its rated speed,
    > simply set the jumpers as tho the CPU was a 100MHz classic Pentium. This
    may
    > sound strange, but, trust me, it works.
    >
    > If the system is not seeing the proper amount of memory, a BIOS update
    will not
    > change this one whit. If it is not seeing the right amount of memory,
    either
    > the memory is defective, or one or more SIMM sockets are defective or
    dirty, or
    > the memory is does not meet the requirements of the motherboard.
    >
    > If the memory is somehow incorrect for the motherboard, all manner of
    error
    > messages and failures can ensue. Get the memory right, then worry about
    the
    > rest, including another CPU. Download MEMTEST-86 from the memtest web
    site, and
    > run MEMTEST-86 to ensure that the memory setup is OK. MEMTEST-86 is
    perhaps the
    > best all-round memory diagnostic, and it is a free download. If the
    computer
    > runs several complete cycles of memory tests with MEMTEST-86, then the
    memory is
    > OK. One error as indicated by MEMTEST-86 implies that the memory is not
    right
    > for the computer... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 05:15:12 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    > >OK I will download the spec from the Intel site as there doesn't seem to
    be
    > >sufficient detail on the PB site which I mentioned. And if the BIOS is
    the
    > >latest, there must be some other reason for the system not seeing the
    memory
    > >which SEEMS to be inserted properly in the slots (and if it wasnt, surely
    I
    > >would hear beeps??)
    > >
    > >WHat is peculiar is that everyone seems to think that a 233 MHZ can't
    EASILY
    > >be put in a PB 680 mother board.
    > >
    > >There is something else wrong in that when (even identifying only 16 Meg
    of
    > >memory) the unit tries to get into Windows it starts giving error
    messages
    > >telling me that it cant find certain files it needs to start windows and
    I
    > >need to reinstall windows. WHich I dont necessarily believe but wonder if
    > >there is any program I can use to correct this? If I can get into
    windows,
    > >perhaps I can see howmuch memory is installed
    > >
    > >I also have a drive with a working windows installation which works iwth
    a
    > >Dell Dimension XPa 233 which wont even start or bring up an initial
    windows
    > >splash screen on this PB. The drive works unbelievably slowly and I cant
    > >beleive all this results from installation with a wrong chipset
    > >
    > >BW
    > ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    > >news:413132d3.11004699@news.charter.net...
    > >> "Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    > >there but
    > >> which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips ARE
    in?"
    > >Not
    > >> sure if you mis-stated with THREE SIMMS, but the motherboard works only
    > >with
    > >> matched pairs of SIMMs. That is a rule almost inviolate with Pentium
    > >class
    > >> motherboards and 72-pin SIMMs.
    > >>
    > >> Don't flash the BIOS. Your motherboard has the latest and last BIOS.
    > >Altho
    > >> I've flashed the BIOS in maybe thousands of motherboards over the
    years, I
    > >still
    > >> think it is a risky procedure. Perhaps more risky for you than for me.
    > >>
    > >> Packard Bell was notoriously sloppy with its bill-of-materials in the
    > >assembly
    > >> of computers, and also with the myriad of names on the front, Pulsars,
    > >Legends,
    > >> etc. It is no wonder that there is conflicting information about the
    > >> motherboard inside your system. Ignore what you see elsewhere. You
    KNOW
    > >what
    > >> you've got there, very pragmatically.
    > >>
    > >> FInally, download the spec for the motherboard. It has good solid
    > >detailed
    > >> inforamtion, a hallmark of Intel-designed motherboards... Ben Myers
    > >>
    > >> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:27:29 -0400, "Licensed to Quill"
    > >> <vintagepen@compuserve.nospam.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Hi Ben
    > >> >
    > >> >You were right: Where it says the identification of the block ISN'T
    the
    > >> >place where you set the CMOS. That is bank D and when I set bank A as
    you
    > >> >suggested, all started coming alive.
    > >> >
    > >> >But curiously the original memory still gives three beeps. So I took
    it
    > >out
    > >> >and put in two 32 meg EDO chips which resulted in a proper boot. So I
    put
    > >in
    > >> >the two original 8 meg chips (at least I thought they were 8 meg SIMMS
    as
    > >> >they registered 16 Meg when I originally started the system and now
    hey
    > >> >presto!! it reads 32 Meg.
    > >> >
    > >> >Can't figure out why the mobo can't read the three SIMMS which are in
    > >there
    > >> >but which nevertheless doesn't give error messages when those chips
    ARE
    > >in?
    > >> >Is this something to do with the other B C or D blocks which make it
    read
    > >> >the memory slots properly?
    > >> >
    > >> >Could it be something to do with flahsing the BIOS? The trouble is
    that
    > >the
    > >> >BIOS in there is an Amibios 1.00.11DNOR whereas the serial number
    > >identifies
    > >> >it as a Pulsar 19 and any Pulsar According to the PB site
    > >>
    >
    >>http://support.packardbell.com/uk/mypc/index.php?PibItemNr=platform_sympho
    n
    > >ymultimedia&PibLinkGroup=2000#show
    > >> >should have an Apollo, or a Luna or a Bora Pro or some Athena or
    Phoenix
    > >> >BIOS??
    > >> >
    > >> >Do you think I can replace my AMI with one of these to cure these
    > >problems?
    > >> >Sounds like an incredibly risky stratiegy to me as you can't back up a
    > >BIOS
    > >> >and reinstall it??
    > >> >
    > >> >Licensed to Quill
    > >> >
    > >> <SNIP!>
    > >
    > >
    >
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