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Apponitment timings when changing time zones

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Anonymous
April 22, 2004 1:46:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
when you change your location to a different time zone?

This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
calendar to incorrect ones.

I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
sort this out?
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 7:28:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

julian.caruana@btinternet.com (Julian Caruana) wrote in message news:<OY0bplIKEHA.892@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>...
> Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
> Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
> when you change your location to a different time zone?

No, you can't change it.

But seriously, why is it "stupid"? What's the point of having home
and visiting time settings if the computer DIDN'T shift appointments
automatically? If you don't want the appointments to shift, simply
reset the PPC's "home" clock the same way you reset your watch.

> This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
> machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
> rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
> the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
> calendar to incorrect ones.

You're supposed to set your appointments to reflect local time when
you create them. For example, say you're in NYC, and you're
scheduling a conference call with the LA office at 1:00 PM (NY time)
on Friday. You enter the call in the calendar. Now on Wednesday the
boss tells you the company wants you to attend the meeting in person
and hands you a plane ticket. You land in LA, set your PPC to
visiting time zone "Pacific" and voila, the appointment shifts to the
(correct) time of 10AM automatically.


> I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
> can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
> calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
> country" feature.

If you learn to think in terms of "universal" time, it's a very handy
feature. If you find it annoying, don't use it and just set the home
zone like it's a Timex when you travel.

> If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
> sort this out?

I doubt it- it's worked this way ever since the first handheld and
Palm-sized PC's from the late 90's, and people have been making your
exact complaint ever since! ;-)

There are a few third party apps I've heard about that add a "dumb"
world clock function to your PPC without shifting appointments.
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 7:49:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Julian Caruana" <julian.caruana@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:o Y0bplIKEHA.892@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
> Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
> Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
> when you change your location to a different time zone?
>
> This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
> machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
> rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
> the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
> calendar to incorrect ones.
>
> I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
> can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
> calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
> country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
> sort this out?
>

Just a guess, but I'm betting its not that your PocketPC is "changing" the
times on the appointments, its that it probably stores the timing in a
non-localized format (Like GMT-time), to facilitate coordination with other
PPCs, Exchange servers, etc, that may have differing timezones. When you
change the timezone on your device, all of a sudden the calculations it does
to display the locallized time for appointments will change, resulting in a
different time displayed. Unless Microsoft started storing timezone data for
each appointment, or actually did go to every appointment and manually
change the time on it everytime you changed the timezone (which could then
cause time conflicts/repeated appointments if synced to a PC, as well as
take forever if you had thousands of appointments), then there's no easy fix
for this.

-Eric
Related resources
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 10:04:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:46:50 -0700, julian.caruana@btinternet.com
(Julian Caruana) wrote:

>I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful,
Very few ;-)

Have a look at the freeware Time Zone :
http://www.geocities.com/alexaleks3/
---
Torgamm
http://www.pocketpcfreewares.com
April 22, 2004 10:43:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Here here. IMO this is an extremely annoying and potentially dangerous
default. I have often set my appointments to the local time and then been
caught out when I change the time zone on my PPC.

This is definitely one "feature" that I could do without.

"Julian Caruana" <julian.caruana@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:o Y0bplIKEHA.892@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
> Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
> Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
> when you change your location to a different time zone?
>
> This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
> machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
> rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
> the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
> calendar to incorrect ones.
>
> I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
> can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
> calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
> country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
> sort this out?
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 12:26:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I also just change the home time instead of the time zone when I
travel.

It causes me more confusion and irritation than it's worth
trying to manually change times for appointments for when I get
home again. I also noticed that synching to Outlook (PC) at my
home time often spreads appointments across two days.

It just doesn't work for me. I'd also be interested to hear from
anyone who it does.

--
Duncan


"Julian Caruana" <julian.caruana@btinternet.com> wrote in
message news:o Y0bplIKEHA.892@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
> Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid)
function of
> Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of
calendar entries
> when you change your location to a different time zone?
>
> This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot
use the
> machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local
time manually
> rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone
because using
> the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in
the
> calendar to incorrect ones.
>
> I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting
useful, as I
> can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you
cannot use the
> calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the
"visiting
> country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft
offer a patch to
> sort this out?
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 10:58:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

This looks good I'm going to give it a try......

--
Duncan


> Have a look at the freeware Time Zone :
> http://www.geocities.com/alexaleks3/
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 11:28:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

julian.caruana@btinternet.com (Julian Caruana) wrote:

>
>Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
>Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
>when you change your location to a different time zone?
>
>This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
>machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
>rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
>the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
>calendar to incorrect ones.
>
>I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
>can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
>calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
>country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
>sort this out?

I love the way it works. There could be some improvements to the UI to
make it more intuitive, like including a City in the appointment to
make it easier to see *where* (what timezone) the appointment will be
in.

If you don't like that behavior, just change the clock on your PPC
when traveling rather than the timezone.
--
__________________________________________________________________________________
Ed Hansberry (Please do *NOT* email me. Post here for the benefit of all)
What is on my Pocket PC? http://www.ehansberry.com/
Microsoft MVP - Mobile Devices www.pocketpc.com
What is an MVP? - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 11:36:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Time based on GMT is not stupid. I think stupid is a much too harsh word
for it and even far from correct.

A person who travels across time zones should at least be knowledgable about
GMT.

I have my Pocket PC set at Home which is GMT +8... If I have to make an
appointment for the UK which is GMT, then all I have to do is set it 8 hrs
less or shift to Visiting Time Zone, enter the appointment and shift back to
my Home Time Zone.

The use of GMT is the most logical and internationally accepted way of
synchronizing time.

Why do the timings change? Well simply because you set them based on GMT.
If you are living at -8 GMT and you set your appointment at 10AM... you are
actually setting it at 6PM GMT which would mean 2AM the next day for me
since I am in +8 GMT.

If you email me for a chat at 10 AM your time... I receive the notice and
Outlook will fire an alarm and tell me that at 2AM I have a chat going with
you... Now imagine if there was no timezone shift... That would mean that
when you send me a chat schedule for 10 AM your time and I receive a notice
in Outlook for a chat at 10 AM too... and I'm half way across the globe...
do you think we'll ever get to chat with eachother?

Mabuhay! ~ Carlo

--
Carlo Ma. Guerrero
Microsoft MVP, Mobile Devices
"Julian Caruana" <julian.caruana@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:o Y0bplIKEHA.892@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
> Does anyone know if you can change the (in my opinion stupid) function of
> Pocket Windows 2003 calendar that changes the timings of calendar entries
> when you change your location to a different time zone?
>
> This function is really annoying as it means that you cannot use the
> machine as an alarm unless you reset the clock to the local time manually
> rather than saying that you are visiting the new time zone because using
> the visiting function changes all the timings that you have in the
> calendar to incorrect ones.
>
> I am interested to know if anyone finds this default setting useful, as I
> can see no possible use for it apart from ensuring that you cannot use the
> calendar timings if you travel across time zones and use the "visiting
> country" feature. If the answer is no, then can Microsoft offer a patch to
> sort this out?
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 2:54:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Julian,

I only find it useful after discovering TripTracker by Two Peaks
Software.

--
Thomas Borchert, Fri, 23 Apr 2004 09:51 +0200
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 10:20:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Good day,

As per some of the other respondents.

The way the time shift has been implemented on PPC is the RIGHT way of
doing it.

All time entries should be reflective of GMT (i.e., universal time) with
the relevant shift to take into account your current time zone.

If you change the time zone on your PPC (or PC), then the appointments
should automatically shift. It is the logical thing to do.

If you enter your appointments in OTHER time zones in your LOCAL TIME,
then you are actually incorrectly putting in your appointments, IMHO.

If you can't work out the timing difference, then you shouldn't be
changing the time zone setting on your PPC and should simply reset your
PPC clock to the local time on arrival. Changing time zones on your PPC
is SUPPOSED to change the appointment times -- otherwise, do you really
need your PPC to tell you you are now in New York as opposed to London?? ;-)

The thing that DOES need to change is that Outlook (and indeed Pocket
Outlook) should have a way that makes it easy to enter appointments in
different time zones and have these marked as such. For example, I
might know that I have an appointment at 1 PM in London -- Outlook
shouldn't require me to manually calculate the time difference when
entering the appointment.

Regards,
Michael Tam

--
-------------------------------------
Michael Tam
e-mail: vitualis (at) michaeltam.com
website: http://www.michaeltam.com
April 24, 2004 6:34:15 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Michael Tam" <vitualis_NOSPAM_@michaeltam.com> wrote in message
news:4088d1b3@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> Good day,
> (snip)
> The way the time shift has been implemented on PPC is the RIGHT way of
> doing it.
>
> If you change the time zone on your PPC (or PC), then the appointments
> should automatically shift. It is the logical thing to do.
> (snip)
> If you enter your appointments in OTHER time zones in your LOCAL TIME,
> then you are actually incorrectly putting in your appointments, IMHO.
> (snip)
> Regards,
> Michael Tam

Yes, but.... (and there is no right answer)

My problem is that I have a TON of regular appointments. Then I go on
vacation (in another timezone) and add vacation appointments. My choices
(if I were to change the timezone) are to:
1) Delete specific instances of all of my recurring appointments (often
15 per day), or
2) Have my alarm go off at very inappropriate times (because the
recurring appointments have alarms). Not a hassle during daytime as they
are easy to ignore, but at 2AM it is not fun.

My solution is to not change the timezone and reset the clock as you would a
wristwatch. This screws up the ephemeris and sunrise/sunset times, but I
can live with that.

Most people (including me) are mixed-mode -- SOME of our appointments we
want to time-shift as is done (as you point out), properly, and SOME of our
appointments we don't want to time-shift.

No piece of hardware/software is going to figure this out on its own. We
humans are inconsistent and the computers can't cope.

- Skip
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 12:52:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

This app is good it's solved my problems with time zones.

--
Duncan

"Duncan Rounding" <duncan.rounding@insurancentlworld.com> wrote
in message news:e8%23M6fPKEHA.1760@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> This looks good I'm going to give it a try......
>
> --
> Duncan
>
>
> > Have a look at the freeware Time Zone :
> > http://www.geocities.com/alexaleks3/
> >
>
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2004 3:36:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Well, I guess the issue then is not if the appointments are in the correct
time... but if you want the alarm to fire at those inappropriate times...

I think the solution there would be something like MeetingMute which will
control alarms at a specified time frame.
http://www.pocketconcepts.com/MeetingMute.html

So if you don't want alarms to fire really loud at 10PM to 6AM the next
morning, try out Meeting Mute...


--
Carlo Ma. Guerrero
Microsoft MVP, Mobile Devices
"Skip" <reply@newsgroup.invalid> wrote in message
news:Hmkic.13943$w96.1301097@attbi_s54...
> "Michael Tam" <vitualis_NOSPAM_@michaeltam.com> wrote in message
> news:4088d1b3@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> > Good day,
> > (snip)
> > The way the time shift has been implemented on PPC is the RIGHT way of
> > doing it.
> >
> > If you change the time zone on your PPC (or PC), then the appointments
> > should automatically shift. It is the logical thing to do.
> > (snip)
> > If you enter your appointments in OTHER time zones in your LOCAL TIME,
> > then you are actually incorrectly putting in your appointments, IMHO.
> > (snip)
> > Regards,
> > Michael Tam
>
> Yes, but.... (and there is no right answer)
>
> My problem is that I have a TON of regular appointments. Then I go on
> vacation (in another timezone) and add vacation appointments. My choices
> (if I were to change the timezone) are to:
> 1) Delete specific instances of all of my recurring appointments (often
> 15 per day), or
> 2) Have my alarm go off at very inappropriate times (because the
> recurring appointments have alarms). Not a hassle during daytime as they
> are easy to ignore, but at 2AM it is not fun.
>
> My solution is to not change the timezone and reset the clock as you would
a
> wristwatch. This screws up the ephemeris and sunrise/sunset times, but I
> can live with that.
>
> Most people (including me) are mixed-mode -- SOME of our appointments we
> want to time-shift as is done (as you point out), properly, and SOME of
our
> appointments we don't want to time-shift.
>
> No piece of hardware/software is going to figure this out on its own. We
> humans are inconsistent and the computers can't cope.
>
> - Skip
>
>
>
!