Old Parkard Bell Systems and Software Disc's

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

I have three PB Computers lounging in my basement and all the associateed disc's for them.

I don't recall which models they are, but I want to unload them and I know that even though
PB is now a distance memory, I figured that maybe I can at the least part them out and get
rid of the software.

Somewhere down the road soon I will be pulling this stuff out and checking on what I have and will
be posting it back here.

I was just wondering if there would be any interest.
6 answers Last reply
More about parkard bell systems software disc
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Hello,

    I might be interested; I'm trying to up my old PB Legend 406CD so that
    it can be a cheap Linux lab box. Let me know, thanks for posting.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    As always, depends on the age and condition. Personally, I think 386 and 486
    computers are of little use any more, even running Linux. Some of the Pentium
    systems can be outfitted with Windows 98 or Linux and serve perfectly well for
    surfing the web, writing letters, doing basic spreadsheet computations, etc.

    For my part, I have no interest, but others will. I also have modestly priced
    motherboards for PB Pentium-class systems, if anyone wants a replacement or a
    minor speed upgrade to, say, Socket 7 CPUs and cache memory on the motherboard
    itself. PB had Intel and other manufacturers build cacheless motherboards to
    keep costs down, so they could sell at low prices back then... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 19:55:19 GMT, Phil Salisbury
    <woodlawn.cabinetry@verizon.net> wrote:

    >I have three PB Computers lounging in my basement and all the associateed disc's for them.
    >
    >I don't recall which models they are, but I want to unload them and I know that even though
    >PB is now a distance memory, I figured that maybe I can at the least part them out and get
    >rid of the software.
    >
    >Somewhere down the road soon I will be pulling this stuff out and checking on what I have and will
    >be posting it back here.
    >
    >I was just wondering if there would be any interest.
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Ben,

    All the PB's I have are Pentium class systems.

    I know for a fact that one system is P2 266 mhz processor that runs win98 on it.

    The other two PB's are P1 100mhz processors that ran win95.

    Granted, these systems are not the greatest in terms of speed, but, I was thinking
    more along the lines of tearing them down and offering out the parts of these
    systems to those that could but them to better use.

    As for the software disc's, well, I was thinking in terms of those that could benefit
    from the MasterCD's that PB's systems came with.

    I still know a few people that are using the 386 & 486 systems purely as word
    processors running the old windows 6 dos based systems.

    Phil

    Ben Myers wrote:

    > As always, depends on the age and condition. Personally, I think 386 and 486
    > computers are of little use any more, even running Linux. Some of the Pentium
    > systems can be outfitted with Windows 98 or Linux and serve perfectly well for
    > surfing the web, writing letters, doing basic spreadsheet computations, etc.
    >
    > For my part, I have no interest, but others will. I also have modestly priced
    > motherboards for PB Pentium-class systems, if anyone wants a replacement or a
    > minor speed upgrade to, say, Socket 7 CPUs and cache memory on the motherboard
    > itself. PB had Intel and other manufacturers build cacheless motherboards to
    > keep costs down, so they could sell at low prices back then... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 19:55:19 GMT, Phil Salisbury
    > <woodlawn.cabinetry@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I have three PB Computers lounging in my basement and all the associateed disc's for them.
    > >
    > >I don't recall which models they are, but I want to unload them and I know that even though
    > >PB is now a distance memory, I figured that maybe I can at the least part them out and get
    > >rid of the software.
    > >
    > >Somewhere down the road soon I will be pulling this stuff out and checking on what I have and will
    > >be posting it back here.
    > >
    > >I was just wondering if there would be any interest.
    > >
    > >
    > >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    I agree that 386 and 486 systems can still be put to limited use. But I would
    only give one to my worst enemy... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 14:07:25 GMT, Phil Salisbury
    <woodlawn.cabinetry@verizon.net> wrote:

    >Ben,
    >
    >All the PB's I have are Pentium class systems.
    >
    >I know for a fact that one system is P2 266 mhz processor that runs win98 on it.
    >
    >The other two PB's are P1 100mhz processors that ran win95.
    >
    >Granted, these systems are not the greatest in terms of speed, but, I was thinking
    >more along the lines of tearing them down and offering out the parts of these
    >systems to those that could but them to better use.
    >
    >As for the software disc's, well, I was thinking in terms of those that could benefit
    >from the MasterCD's that PB's systems came with.
    >
    >I still know a few people that are using the 386 & 486 systems purely as word
    >processors running the old windows 6 dos based systems.
    >
    >Phil
    >
    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >
    >> As always, depends on the age and condition. Personally, I think 386 and 486
    >> computers are of little use any more, even running Linux. Some of the Pentium
    >> systems can be outfitted with Windows 98 or Linux and serve perfectly well for
    >> surfing the web, writing letters, doing basic spreadsheet computations, etc.
    >>
    >> For my part, I have no interest, but others will. I also have modestly priced
    >> motherboards for PB Pentium-class systems, if anyone wants a replacement or a
    >> minor speed upgrade to, say, Socket 7 CPUs and cache memory on the motherboard
    >> itself. PB had Intel and other manufacturers build cacheless motherboards to
    >> keep costs down, so they could sell at low prices back then... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 19:55:19 GMT, Phil Salisbury
    >> <woodlawn.cabinetry@verizon.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I have three PB Computers lounging in my basement and all the associateed disc's for them.
    >> >
    >> >I don't recall which models they are, but I want to unload them and I know that even though
    >> >PB is now a distance memory, I figured that maybe I can at the least part them out and get
    >> >rid of the software.
    >> >
    >> >Somewhere down the road soon I will be pulling this stuff out and checking on what I have and will
    >> >be posting it back here.
    >> >
    >> >I was just wondering if there would be any interest.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    Have any overdrive/evergreen/powerleap processors? Also, if you're
    parting out any of the mobos, what version are they (ie Hilliary, 640,
    etc)

    Thanks.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.packardbell (More info?)

    The best I can do on LPX motherboards is a 9" square LPX board with an HP BIOS.
    It supports classic Pentium up to 200MHz, has 2MB S3 on-board graphics, 256K
    external cache, Yamaha sound chip, (2) USB 1.1 ports, the usual pair of serial
    ports, parallel port, two IDE connectors, floppy connector. It will fit
    perfectly in any PB case which has a long narrow single opening in the back for
    all the external connectors. It includes the metal strip which covers the
    external connectors and fills in the narrow back opening. It is made by Intel,
    like most of the PB LPX boards, and is very similar to the Advanced/RU model for
    which high quality Adobe Acrobat specs are available.

    I also have several classic Pentium 200 chips and new heat sink/cooling fans to
    go with them.

    I have a couple of other models of LPX boards here. One is a much larger Intel
    Advanced/RH board which supports up to 192MB memory, but has only 1MB (or is it
    512KB, ugh, I forget).

    Another LPX one is not made by Intel, by GVC, I think. It does support Pentium
    MMX up to 233MHz and some of the higher voltage AMD K6 chips, but not the faster
    400MHz ones. Also 233MHz Pentium MMX chips. I have to fire this one up to
    recall more about it.

    As for PowerLeap, Evergreen or OverDrive processors, I am fresh out. Have not
    had any for a while now.

    I scrapped my Hilary and 640 boards some months ago, thinking that there would
    be almost no demand for them. The cacheless ones are pretty crippled. I have
    lots of other computer parts competing for space. The LPX boards I have
    retained here at least offer a modest upgrade to an LPX system (PB, HP, IBM and
    a few others used LPX boards) at a very modest price in this year 2005, for
    anyone wanting to put in the effort to tear down a system and upgrade it to make
    it faster.

    RSVP direct via email if you are interested in any of these boards, CPUs, fans,
    and 32MB EDO 72-pin SIMM memory. Remove the obvious _spam_me_not from the email
    address... Ben Myers

    On 3 Jan 2005 18:18:11 -0800, "lt_wentoncha" <lt_wentonchan@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Have any overdrive/evergreen/powerleap processors? Also, if you're
    >parting out any of the mobos, what version are they (ie Hilliary, 640,
    >etc)
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
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