Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

HDTV as computer monitor: feasiblity?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 27, 2004 4:30:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a computer
monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors (for flat-panel
displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as inputs for HDTV's? It also seems
like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well. How much would
a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?

I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV wouldn't be of
much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything until you get
into the GUI).

What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of resolutions? Has
anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?
-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 27, 2004 4:30:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Wblane wrote:

> Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a computer
> monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors (for flat-panel
> displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as inputs for HDTV's? It also
> seems like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well. How
> much would a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?
>
> I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV wouldn't be
> of much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything until
> you get into the GUI).
>
> What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of resolutions?
> Has anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?

A real HDTV works reasonably well as a monitor. What you have to watch for
is the ones that have a digital input that they then downscale to SD
resolutions, which is what most of the inexpensive sets do.

There is no such thing as a "text mode" for a PC monitor--as long as the
monitor can display 640x480 it can display the boot screens.

The highest res in the HD standard is 1080x1920, interlaced, and I don't
recall what the refresh rate is but it's not super high.

If the video board can put 720P or 1080i on the DVI output then you should
be in good shape. This is doable with most boards currently in production
using Powerstrip.

The only true HD TVs you're going to find that are smaller than 32 inches or
so will be flat panels and they aren't particularly cheap.

> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

You really are talking an LCD with inbuilt HDTV tuner?

"Wblane" <wblane@aol.combotizer> wrote in message
news:20040826203035.11752.00003751@mb-m11.aol.com...
> Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a computer
> monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors (for flat-panel
> displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as inputs for HDTV's? It also
seems
> like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well. How much
would
> a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?
>
> I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV wouldn't be
of
> much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything until you
get
> into the GUI).
>
> What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of resolutions?
Has
> anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?
> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Related resources
August 28, 2004 1:24:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

sheer wrote:
> You really are talking an LCD with inbuilt HDTV tuner?
>
> "Wblane" <wblane@aol.combotizer> wrote in message
> news:20040826203035.11752.00003751@mb-m11.aol.com...
>
>>Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a computer
>>monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors (for flat-panel
>>displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as inputs for HDTV's? It also
>
> seems
>
>>like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well. How much
>
> would
>
>>a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?
>>
>>I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV wouldn't be
>
> of
>
>>much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything until you
>
> get
>
>>into the GUI).
>>
>>What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of resolutions?
>
> Has
>
>>anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?
>>-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
>
>
>

Actually, I've noticed that the DVI input of my HDTV doesn't really work
well with the DVI output of the video card. Generally the PC doesn't
know how to deal with the monitor to display things properly at correct
resolutions/etc....also many games refuse to deal with the display
altogether and just crash. Could just be my TV not being equipped to
deal with PCs.

However, ATI does sell a DVI (or VGA) to component adapter that plugs
into the video card.

http://www.ati.com/products/hdtvadapter/

I got this at newegg for $35 (including shipping).

This thing works pretty well. Through the standard display settings you
can specify which HDTV modes to use (480i/p, 720p, 1080i, and also a
16:9 for WS if you got it).
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

nobody wrote:
> sheer wrote:
>> You really are talking an LCD with inbuilt HDTV tuner?
>>
>> "Wblane" <wblane@aol.combotizer> wrote in message
>> news:20040826203035.11752.00003751@mb-m11.aol.com...
>>
>>> Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a
>>> computer monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors
>>> (for flat-panel displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as
>>> inputs for HDTV's? It also
>>
>> seems
>>
>>> like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well.
>>> How much
>>
>> would
>>
>>> a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?
>>>
>>> I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV
>>> wouldn't be
>>
>> of
>>
>>> much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything
>>> until you
>>
>> get
>>
>>> into the GUI).
>>>
>>> What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of
>>> resolutions?
>>
>> Has
>>
>>> anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?
>>> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
>>
>>
>>
>
> Actually, I've noticed that the DVI input of my HDTV doesn't really
> work well with the DVI output of the video card. Generally the PC
> doesn't know how to deal with the monitor to display things properly
> at correct resolutions/etc....also many games refuse to deal with the
> display altogether and just crash. Could just be my TV not being
> equipped to deal with PCs.
>
> However, ATI does sell a DVI (or VGA) to component adapter that plugs
> into the video card.
>
> http://www.ati.com/products/hdtvadapter/
>
> I got this at newegg for $35 (including shipping).
>
> This thing works pretty well. Through the standard display settings
> you can specify which HDTV modes to use (480i/p, 720p, 1080i, and
> also a 16:9 for WS if you got it).

My set doesn't have DVI so I use a VGA-to-HD Transcoder. I use a Sony
monitor driver for the set and powerstrip to pick the resolution. It works
well.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

This is all beginning to sound too complicated. I remember the nightmare I went
thru a couple of years ago trying to get a 21" fixed frequency monitor to work
w/my 9500 Pro -- I don't want to go thru that again.

Just for the record are HDTV's fixed frequency devices? Do they support
standard PC resolutions? Do HDTV's support > 60Hz refresh rates?

I live in an efficiency aparment (translation: small) and I need a new TV so I
was thinking why not combine the TV w/a big monitor and get an HDTV of some
type.
-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On 27 Aug 2004 18:14:36 GMT, wblane@aol.combotizer (Wblane) wrote:

>This is all beginning to sound too complicated. I remember the nightmare I went
>thru a couple of years ago trying to get a 21" fixed frequency monitor to work
>w/my 9500 Pro -- I don't want to go thru that again.
>
>Just for the record are HDTV's fixed frequency devices? Do they support
>standard PC resolutions? Do HDTV's support > 60Hz refresh rates?
>
>I live in an efficiency aparment (translation: small) and I need a new TV so I
>was thinking why not combine the TV w/a big monitor and get an HDTV of some
>type.
>-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)

Why not get a nice large computer monitor and use one of these. I have
one.

http://www.viewsonic.com/products/tventertainment/tvvid...
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Wblane wrote:

> This is all beginning to sound too complicated. I remember the nightmare I
> went thru a couple of years ago trying to get a 21" fixed frequency
> monitor to work w/my 9500 Pro -- I don't want to go thru that again.
>
> Just for the record are HDTV's fixed frequency devices? Do they support
> standard PC resolutions? Do HDTV's support > 60Hz refresh rates?

Depends. Some do, some don't. Don't count on it, assume that any set you
look at is limited to the resolutions defined in the HDTV standards unless
the manufacturer (and not the store) specifically states otherwise.

> I live in an efficiency aparment (translation: small) and I need a new TV
> so I was thinking why not combine the TV w/a big monitor and get an HDTV
> of some type.

You'd do better to get a big monitor and use the computer as the TV
receiver.

> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

A big CRT and some type of tuner card is what I'm thinking now (since I can get
TV tuner card for dirt cheap right now and have my FIC VA503+ all ready to go).

>Why not get a nice large computer monitor and use one of these. I have
>one.
>
>http://www.viewsonic.com/products/tventertainment/tvvid...
>
>


-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 1:24:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On 27 Aug 2004 21:04:05 GMT, wblane@aol.combotizer (Wblane) wrote:

>A big CRT and some type of tuner card is what I'm thinking now (since I can get
>TV tuner card for dirt cheap right now and have my FIC VA503+ all ready to go).

Yea, but with an internal TV tuner card you have to have your computer
on to watch TV. With the Viewsonic system it is all passthrough so you
don't need to have the computer on to watch TV.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 4:21:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On 27 Aug 2004 21:04:05 GMT, wblane@aol.combotizer (Wblane) wrote:
>
>>A big CRT and some type of tuner card is what I'm thinking now (since I
>>can get TV tuner card for dirt cheap right now and have my FIC VA503+ all
>>ready to go).
>
> Yea, but with an internal TV tuner card you have to have your computer
> on to watch TV. With the Viewsonic system it is all passthrough so you
> don't need to have the computer on to watch TV.

And you can't record and you're limited to one channel and you can't recieve
HDTV.

I have never understood why some people consider having their computer
turned on to be a hardship. Personally I seldom turn mine off.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 5:27:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Keep in mind the resolution of HDTV may not be sufficient. From what I
remember reading about HDTVs, there are the 1080i (interlaced) and 720p
(progressive) standards, both with 16:9 aspect ratio, so a HDTV only has the
equivalent of 1280x720 max resolution. Projecting this onto a 36" display
could look ugly when you need to read text.

--
"War is the continuation of politics by other means.
It can therefore be said that politics is war without
bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."


"Wblane" <wblane@aol.combotizer> wrote in message
news:20040827141436.05916.00004450@mb-m05.aol.com...
> This is all beginning to sound too complicated. I remember the nightmare I
went
> thru a couple of years ago trying to get a 21" fixed frequency monitor to
work
> w/my 9500 Pro -- I don't want to go thru that again.
>
> Just for the record are HDTV's fixed frequency devices? Do they support
> standard PC resolutions? Do HDTV's support > 60Hz refresh rates?
>
> I live in an efficiency aparment (translation: small) and I need a new TV
so I
> was thinking why not combine the TV w/a big monitor and get an HDTV of
some
> type.
> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 5:27:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

First of One wrote:

> Keep in mind the resolution of HDTV may not be sufficient. From what I
> remember reading about HDTVs, there are the 1080i (interlaced) and 720p
> (progressive) standards, both with 16:9 aspect ratio, so a HDTV only has
> the equivalent of 1280x720 max resolution.

I beg to disagree. If the set supports 1080i then its resolution is
1920x1080.

> Projecting this onto a 36"
> display could look ugly when you need to read text.

Actually 1280x720 works fine for text on my 8 foot screen.
>

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
August 28, 2004 4:40:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Moreover, the HDTV spec also allows for 1080 p (progressive scan) to be implemented
whenever feasable. Now that will be a TV set!
--
Todd
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 5:19:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 00:21:40 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>And you can't record and you're limited to one channel and you can't recieve
>HDTV.

You watch more than one channel at a time? And why can't it recieve
HDTV? It does 16:9 ratio and 4:3.

>I have never understood why some people consider having their computer
>turned on to be a hardship. Personally I seldom turn mine off.

Noise.
August 28, 2004 5:48:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

A few weeks back I tried my x800 platinum on my sony 51 rear
projection HDTV. The card comes with an HDTV adapter.It did work - but
not very well as the scaling was off. I am hoping the new Catalyst
drivers that came outlast week will fix this. I hope to try it out
again tommorrow

Joe



On 27 Aug 2004 00:30:35 GMT, wblane@aol.combotizer (Wblane) wrote:

>Does anyone out there know the feasability of using an HDTV as a computer
>monitor? It seems like most vid-cards have DVI connectors (for flat-panel
>displays). Aren't DVI connectors also used as inputs for HDTV's? It also seems
>like most video card drivers support widescreen formats as well. How much would
>a 24" to 25" HDTV with DVI inputs cost these days?
>
>I'd imagine HDTV's can't handle text modes right? So and HDTV wouldn't be of
>much use when booting a PC (viz. since you couldn't see anything until you get
>into the GUI).
>
>What kind of refresh rates can HDTV's handle? What kind of resolutions? Has
>anyone else tried this? Any FAQ's out there?
>-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 6:23:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:cgp1or02cdn@news1.newsguy.com...
> > Keep in mind the resolution of HDTV may not be sufficient. From what I
> > remember reading about HDTVs, there are the 1080i (interlaced) and 720p
> > (progressive) standards, both with 16:9 aspect ratio, so a HDTV only has
> > the equivalent of 1280x720 max resolution.
>
> I beg to disagree. If the set supports 1080i then its resolution is
> 1920x1080.

Yes, but that's 1920x1080 interlaced. If you feed a progressive-scan signal
to it, will it "downsample" and output an interlaced picture?

Though in the case of LCD TVs, I guess refresh rate is a bit of a moot
point.

> > Projecting this onto a 36"
> > display could look ugly when you need to read text.
>
> Actually 1280x720 works fine for text on my 8 foot screen.

Any idea what the dot pitch is for your 8 foot screen (or is this a
projector)?

--
"War is the continuation of politics by other means.
It can therefore be said that politics is war without
bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 6:23:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

First of One wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
> news:cgp1or02cdn@news1.newsguy.com...
>> > Keep in mind the resolution of HDTV may not be sufficient. From what I
>> > remember reading about HDTVs, there are the 1080i (interlaced) and 720p
>> > (progressive) standards, both with 16:9 aspect ratio, so a HDTV only
>> > has the equivalent of 1280x720 max resolution.
>>
>> I beg to disagree. If the set supports 1080i then its resolution is
>> 1920x1080.
>
> Yes, but that's 1920x1080 interlaced. If you feed a progressive-scan
> signal to it, will it "downsample" and output an interlaced picture?

There's no "sampling" involved, it just takes two passes to display the
image.

> Though in the case of LCD TVs, I guess refresh rate is a bit of a moot
> point.
>
>> > Projecting this onto a 36"
>> > display could look ugly when you need to read text.
>>
>> Actually 1280x720 works fine for text on my 8 foot screen.
>
> Any idea what the dot pitch is for your 8 foot screen (or is this a
> projector)?

What's 8 divided by the square root of the sum of the squares of 1280 and
720? About .005 inch or .13mm. But it doesn't have a "dot pitch" per se,
which applies only to CRTs, it's an LCD-based display so it has a 1:1
correspondence between physical and logical pixels unless I turn on
scaling.

> --
> "War is the continuation of politics by other means.
> It can therefore be said that politics is war without
> bloodshed while war is politics with bloodshed."

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2004 8:59:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 00:21:40 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>And you can't record and you're limited to one channel and you can't
>>recieve HDTV.
>
> You watch more than one channel at a time? And why can't it recieve
> HDTV? It does 16:9 ratio and 4:3.
>
>>I have never understood why some people consider having their computer
>>turned on to be a hardship. Personally I seldom turn mine off.
>
> Noise.

Then rig it for silent running.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
August 28, 2004 11:20:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

In article <of3vi0d7dlbq5seqsbqf9a0fjkulnpdk7v@4ax.com>, Willie Winger <no@email.here> wrote:
>On 27 Aug 2004 18:14:36 GMT, wblane@aol.combotizer (Wblane) wrote:
>
>>This is all beginning to sound too complicated. I remember the nightmare I
> went
>>thru a couple of years ago trying to get a 21" fixed frequency monitor to work
>>w/my 9500 Pro -- I don't want to go thru that again.
>>
>>Just for the record are HDTV's fixed frequency devices? Do they support
>>standard PC resolutions? Do HDTV's support > 60Hz refresh rates?
>>
>>I live in an efficiency aparment (translation: small) and I need a new TV so I
>>was thinking why not combine the TV w/a big monitor and get an HDTV of some
>>type.
>>-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
>
>Why not get a nice large computer monitor and use one of these. I have
>one.
>
>http://www.viewsonic.com/products/tventertainment/tvvid...

Yup, and they are excellent for feeding your PS2 or XBOX game systems thru
to your 21" monitor!!!!!
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 11:03:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 16:59:38 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>Then rig it for silent running.

No, I like using my Viewsonic N6 just fine, thx. It also upscales the
image as high as 1280x1024. I tired the internal TV Tuner method
already and it is inferior to the N6 method. And as someone else
pointed out already I can connect an X-Box or PS2 and play it on my
computer monitor. But I doubt I'll do that as console games are not my
bag.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 11:04:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:20:56 GMT, glenzabr@nospamallowed.xmission.com
(GMAN) wrote:


>Yup, and they are excellent for feeding your PS2 or XBOX game systems thru
>to your 21" monitor!!!!!

Yea, I've considered doing that but most of the games I am into are PC
games so see no need for a console too.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 3:36:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 16:59:38 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
such devices as the N6.

>>Then rig it for silent running.
>
> No, I like using my Viewsonic N6 just fine, thx. It also upscales the
> image as high as 1280x1024.

Is that just a comment or are you saying that that's somehow an advantage?
If an advantage I have no trouble upscaling to the maximum resolution of
any monitor I attach.

> I tired the internal TV Tuner method
> already and it is inferior to the N6 method.

Inferior in what way? And what were you using for a capture board? I doubt
that Viewsonic makes their own chips for the thing, which means that they
use the same Conexant or Brooktree or Phillips chip as everybody else.

> And as someone else
> pointed out already I can connect an X-Box or PS2 and play it on my
> computer monitor.

What prevents you from doing this with any capture board that has composite
or S-video inputs? Heck, you don't need a tuner, all you need is a VIVO
board for that.

> But I doubt I'll do that as console games are not my
> bag.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 7:30:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 11:36:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
>such devices as the N6.

Features

Experience high-definition video or TV on an LCD, CRT or projection
display
Enjoy up to 181 channels of high-resolution TV (1280x1024) at full
screen in 24-bit color. Simply connect the NextVision N6 to your
antenna or cable feed; or connect to your satellite, cable box or HDTV
set-top-box and enjoy precision scaled HDTV on your display or
projector.

Create and view digital content on your high-resolution display
The NextVision N6 is compatible with industry-standard digital cameras
and camcorders through its multiple video input connections. You can
view your own video content in multiple resolutions up to 1280x1024.

Enjoy full-screen, high-definition video entertainment with or without
your PC
Simply connect your DVD, VCR or gaming console to the NextVision N6
and enjoy your favorite movies on your high-resolution display or
projector. The NextVision N6 provides component video (YPbPr),
S-video, composite (RCA) video connectors, audio pass-through and
front-panel headphone support with or without your PC.

Advanced scaling technology, reverse 3:2 pull down and digital 3-D
comb filter
The NextVision N6 provides reverse 3:2 pull down correction that
eliminates jitter from DVD movies that originated from motion picture
film. A digital 3-D comb filter, motion and adaptive de-interlacing
improves the clarity and sharpness of the video image.

TV/Video input compatibility
480i, 480p, 576p, 720p, 1080i

RGB output capability
640x480, 800x600, 852x480, 1024x768, 1280x720, 1280x768, 1280x1024

Picture-in-picture viewing
When connected to a PC you can view a video or TV window over your
data screen.

Closed caption technology*
Displays text overlay of spoken audio over video.

SAP/MTS Stereo*
Allows the reception of audio other than main programming audio.

Parental control*
Built-in V chip allows controlled programming based on a selected
rating system.

RGB computer pass-through
Watch TV or enjoy your DVD movie without turning on your computer.

Auto tuning
Auto tuning of TV broadcast and cable TV channels.

Sleep timer
Built-in sleep timer automatically shuts off display at pre-determined
times.

Easy connection and control
The NextVision N6 is an external plug-and-play table-top configuration
requiring no software drivers or internal computer installation.

Convenient 28-key remote control
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 8:58:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

If the HDTV is CRT based what kind of refresh rates are we talking here? 60Hz?
For text doesn't 60Hz introduce an annoying flicker? If not 60Hz what are the
refresh rates for all the native resolutions of HDTV? Do ATI drivers (and/or
games) support HDTV resolutions?
-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 11:34:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Wblane wrote:

> If the HDTV is CRT based what kind of refresh rates are we talking here?
> 60Hz? For text doesn't 60Hz introduce an annoying flicker? If not 60Hz
> what are the refresh rates for all the native resolutions of HDTV? Do ATI
> drivers (and/or games) support HDTV resolutions?

The ATI boards can output HDTV resolutions using component or DVI outputs,
but you may need a third party utility called "Powerstrip" to set them.

Using DVI the refresh rate set in the video board is pretty much irrelevant
as the signal goes through a DAC in the set.

Further, TV sets tend to have higher persistence phosphors than CRT
monitors.

The bottom line is that I've not noticed any flicker using a TV for computer
output--the resolution has always been the issue and HD resolves that.

> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 30, 2004 11:53:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 11:36:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
>>such devices as the N6.
>
> Features

<cut and paste from ad copy snipped>

Still don't understand the appeal. Take the price of the N6 plus the price
of a computer monitor and you can get an HDTV set that does the same thing
and displays 1920x1080 insted of 1280x1024. If you want a TV that's a
better choice.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 1:48:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 19:53:20 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>Still don't understand the appeal. Take the price of the N6 plus the price
>of a computer monitor and you can get an HDTV set that does the same thing
>and displays 1920x1080 insted of 1280x1024. If you want a TV that's a
>better choice.

But the whole point was that he wants a TV and a monitor that can
display text well. The N6 solves that problem. Buying an HDTV doesn't.
And using an Xbox through a TV Tuner card requires one to have the
computer on and use overlay mode. That's not the same as displaying
directly to the monitor without having to have the computer and the
console on at the same time.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 5:24:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 19:53:20 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>Still don't understand the appeal. Take the price of the N6 plus the
>>price of a computer monitor and you can get an HDTV set that does the same
>>thing
>>and displays 1920x1080 insted of 1280x1024. If you want a TV that's a
>>better choice.
>
> But the whole point was that he wants a TV and a monitor that can
> display text well. The N6 solves that problem. Buying an HDTV doesn't.

Now let's see. Displaying text at 1280x1024 is adequate but displaying it
at 1920x1080, which is a higher resolution than 1280x1024, is not? How do
you figure that?

> And using an Xbox through a TV Tuner card requires one to have the
> computer on and use overlay mode.

And having the computer on and using overlay mode is a problem because?

> That's not the same as displaying
> directly to the monitor without having to have the computer and the
> console on at the same time.

No, it's not the same. This is a problem because?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 6:20:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 01:24:34 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>Now let's see. Displaying text at 1280x1024 is adequate but displaying it
>at 1920x1080, which is a higher resolution than 1280x1024, is not? How do
>you figure that?

WTF are you talking about? Why would the text from his computer be
limited to 1280x1024 (unless using a 17" LCD)?

>And having the computer on and using overlay mode is a problem because?

Noise, heat, waste of power and inferior quality.


>No, it's not the same. This is a problem because?

Enough dillweed!
August 31, 2004 8:17:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

In article <cgviub01gd1@news4.newsguy.com>, "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>maggot wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 16:59:38 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
>such devices as the N6.
>
>>>Then rig it for silent running.
>>
>> No, I like using my Viewsonic N6 just fine, thx. It also upscales the
>> image as high as 1280x1024.
>
>Is that just a comment or are you saying that that's somehow an advantage?
>If an advantage I have no trouble upscaling to the maximum resolution of
>any monitor I attach.
>
>> I tired the internal TV Tuner method
>> already and it is inferior to the N6 method.
>
>Inferior in what way? And what were you using for a capture board? I doubt
>that Viewsonic makes their own chips for the thing, which means that they
>use the same Conexant or Brooktree or Phillips chip as everybody else.
>
>> And as someone else
>> pointed out already I can connect an X-Box or PS2 and play it on my
>> computer monitor.
>
>What prevents you from doing this with any capture board that has composite
>or S-video inputs? Heck, you don't need a tuner, all you need is a VIVO
>board for that.

The main point here is that it allows one to eliminate having to have the
computer on and being used as a pass thru to do the above.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 8:17:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

GMAN wrote:

> In article <cgviub01gd1@news4.newsguy.com>, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>>maggot wrote:
>>
>>> On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 16:59:38 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>>> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
>>such devices as the N6.
>>
>>>>Then rig it for silent running.
>>>
>>> No, I like using my Viewsonic N6 just fine, thx. It also upscales the
>>> image as high as 1280x1024.
>>
>>Is that just a comment or are you saying that that's somehow an advantage?
>>If an advantage I have no trouble upscaling to the maximum resolution of
>>any monitor I attach.
>>
>>> I tired the internal TV Tuner method
>>> already and it is inferior to the N6 method.
>>
>>Inferior in what way? And what were you using for a capture board? I
>>doubt that Viewsonic makes their own chips for the thing, which means that
>>they use the same Conexant or Brooktree or Phillips chip as everybody
>>else.
>>
>>> And as someone else
>>> pointed out already I can connect an X-Box or PS2 and play it on my
>>> computer monitor.
>>
>>What prevents you from doing this with any capture board that has
>>composite
>>or S-video inputs? Heck, you don't need a tuner, all you need is a VIVO
>>board for that.
>
> The main point here is that it allows one to eliminate having to have the
> computer on and being used as a pass thru to do the above.

And my point being that I for one never turn the computer off and still
don't understand why people make such a huge deal about having it on. And
it's more than a "pass through". And I'd rather have the computer directly
connected to the monitor than passed through Viewsonic's box.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
August 31, 2004 8:19:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

In article <ch0f2u0tfa@news2.newsguy.com>, "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>maggot wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 11:36:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal of
>>>such devices as the N6.
>>
>> Features
>
><cut and paste from ad copy snipped>
>
>Still don't understand the appeal. Take the price of the N6 plus the price
>of a computer monitor and you can get an HDTV set that does the same thing
>and displays 1920x1080 insted of 1280x1024. If you want a TV that's a
>better choice.
>
The appeal being that if you own a projector it makes a very nice tuner to add
to the projector. I own a proxima projector and using a vcr for a tuner just
doesnt cut it. These N6 boxes have 3D comb filtering , video scaling, etc that
makes the 7 foot wide image shine.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 8:19:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

GMAN wrote:

> In article <ch0f2u0tfa@news2.newsguy.com>, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>>maggot wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 11:36:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"
>>> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>I'm not trying to be argumentative but I've never understood the appeal
>>>>of such devices as the N6.
>>>
>>> Features
>>
>><cut and paste from ad copy snipped>
>>
>>Still don't understand the appeal. Take the price of the N6 plus the
>>price of a computer monitor and you can get an HDTV set that does the same
>>thing
>>and displays 1920x1080 insted of 1280x1024. If you want a TV that's a
>>better choice.
>>
> The appeal being that if you own a projector it makes a very nice tuner to
> add to the projector. I own a proxima projector and using a vcr for a
> tuner just doesnt cut it. These N6 boxes have 3D comb filtering , video
> scaling, etc that makes the 7 foot wide image shine.

If you're using HD then you don't need 3D comb filtering, video scaling,
etc. However a decent projector already has those capabilities built in,
and if mine didn't, then dscaler gives better results than all but the
highest-end video processors.


--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
August 31, 2004 7:07:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 01:24:34 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>Now let's see. Displaying text at 1280x1024 is adequate but displaying it
>>at 1920x1080, which is a higher resolution than 1280x1024, is not? How do
>>you figure that?
>
> WTF are you talking about? Why would the text from his computer be
> limited to 1280x1024 (unless using a 17" LCD)?

The specs for your magic box say that the maximum output resolution is
1280x1024.

>>And having the computer on and using overlay mode is a problem because?
>
> Noise, heat, waste of power and inferior quality.

Which tells me that you've never used a PC that was set up properly for home
theater. You're assuming that all PCs are mass-market Dells.

>>No, it's not the same. This is a problem because?
>
> Enough dillweed!

I was wondering if you had any reasons for using the thing or if you were
just engaging in mindless advocacy. Now I know.


--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 1, 2004 1:15:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 15:03:44 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>Care to provide me some numbers to support that contention?

Um, remember the power outages of last summer?

>It doesn't? Now let's see, I feed it 1600x1200 and out comes 1280x1024, and
>that's not degredation? Not to mention that it won't pass DVI.

You are a seriously confused dork.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 1, 2004 3:35:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

What about in games though? Can Powerstrip set resolutions in games? What do
you mean by HD? Hydravision? How much a 25" HDTV goes for these days? Do HDTV's
support standard TV aspect ratios or is it all widescreen?

I'm still sitting on the fence. I've seen 24" CRT's for a little over a grand,
but I haven't priced any HDTV's.

>The ATI boards can output HDTV resolutions using component or DVI outputs,
>but you may need a third party utility called "Powerstrip" to set them.
>
>Using DVI the refresh rate set in the video board is pretty much irrelevant
>as the signal goes through a DAC in the set.
>
>Further, TV sets tend to have higher persistence phosphors than CRT
>monitors.
>
>The bottom line is that I've not noticed any flicker using a TV for computer
>output--the resolution has always been the issue and HD resolves that.
>
>> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
>
>--
>--John
>Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net


-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 1, 2004 3:35:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Wblane wrote:

> What about in games though? Can Powerstrip set resolutions in games?

Games either use the Windows settings or set their own from among a small
range. They're a problem if you're using an HDTV for output.

> What
> do you mean by HD?

High definition. Digital television transmission at resolutions higher that
analog broadcast. Nearly all US broadcast stations are transmitting HD in
addition to their analog signal, and analog is supposed to be phased out in
a few years.

> Hydravision? How much a 25" HDTV goes for these days?
> Do HDTV's support standard TV aspect ratios or is it all widescreen?

HDTVs can do anything an analog TV can do. Some can scale to widescreen so
that letterboxed SD uses the whole screen or do other tricks.

> I'm still sitting on the fence. I've seen 24" CRT's for a little over a
> grand, but I haven't priced any HDTV's.

The trouble with HDTVs is finding one with all the specs provided. You can
get into one for around the same price that will have a bigger screen but a
smaller range of resolutions. Unfortunately in that price range they're
typically limited to about 720 lines horizontal resolution--that's 720P,
which is actually quite good but not as good as a purpose-made monitor.

>>The ATI boards can output HDTV resolutions using component or DVI outputs,
>>but you may need a third party utility called "Powerstrip" to set them.
>>
>>Using DVI the refresh rate set in the video board is pretty much
>>irrelevant as the signal goes through a DAC in the set.
>>
>>Further, TV sets tend to have higher persistence phosphors than CRT
>>monitors.
>>
>>The bottom line is that I've not noticed any flicker using a TV for
>>computer output--the resolution has always been the issue and HD resolves
>>that.
>>
>>> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
>>
>>--
>>--John
>>Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
>
>
> -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 1, 2004 5:32:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 00:36:39 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>If the text output goes through your wondrous little box then it is subject
>to the limitations of that box. If it doesn't go through your little box
>then you have to plug cables every time you want to use the computer or the
>TV.

It's passthrough remember?! The text output doesn't go throught the
wittle box. Get it now?
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 2, 2004 2:34:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

The 720 lines of horizontal resolution would preclude using 1024x768? That
would be the minimum resolution I'd want my desktop at.

>he trouble with HDTVs is finding one with all the specs provided. You can
>get into one for around the same price that will have a bigger screen but a
>smaller range of resolutions. Unfortunately in that price range they're
>typically limited to about 720 lines horizontal resolution--that's 720P,
>which is actually quite good but not as good as a purpose-made monitor.
>

That's all I need to hear. HDTV as a monitor is now definitely out. I remember
the nightmare of trying to get a fixed frequency 20" NCD monitor to work three
years ago -- I'm NOT going thru that again.

>Games either use the Windows settings or set their own from among a small
>range. They're a problem if you're using an HDTV for output.




>--
>--John
>Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
>(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
>
>


-Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 2, 2004 2:57:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 00:36:39 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>If the text output goes through your wondrous little box then it is
>>subject
>>to the limitations of that box. If it doesn't go through your little box
>>then you have to plug cables every time you want to use the computer or
>>the TV.
>
> It's passthrough remember?! The text output doesn't go throught the
> wittle box. Get it now?

I see. So if it doesn't go through the little box how does it get from the
computer to the screen?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 2, 2004 4:17:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 22:57:14 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>I see. So if it doesn't go through the little box how does it get from the
>computer to the screen?

Passthrough.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 3, 2004 12:05:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 22:57:14 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>I see. So if it doesn't go through the little box how does it get from the
>>computer to the screen?
>
> Passthrough.

In other words there is no way to simultaneously display TV and computer
output on the monitor using the N6 because the computer output is simply
passed through the box on copper wires with no active components at all
between input and output?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 3, 2004 5:55:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:05:57 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>In other words there is no way to simultaneously display TV and computer
>output on the monitor using the N6 because the computer output is simply
>passed through the box on copper wires with no active components at all
>between input and output?

You can display the TV while the computer is on using PIP.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 4, 2004 5:14:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:05:57 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>In other words there is no way to simultaneously display TV and computer
>>output on the monitor using the N6 because the computer output is simply
>>passed through the box on copper wires with no active components at all
>>between input and output?
>
> You can display the TV while the computer is on using PIP.

I see. And how does that get displayed with a "pass through" without any
processing by the N6?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 4, 2004 5:09:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 01:14:59 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>I see. And how does that get displayed with a "pass through" without any
>processing by the N6?

By superimposing the PIP image on top of the computer screen image.
Move along, you lose.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
September 4, 2004 9:58:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

maggot wrote:

> On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 01:14:59 -0400, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>I see. And how does that get displayed with a "pass through" without any
>>processing by the N6?
>
> By superimposing the PIP image on top of the computer screen image.
> Move along, you lose.

And how does it replace the pixels in the datastream sent by the computer
with the pixels of the PIP image if it does no processing on the
datastream?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
September 8, 2008 9:03:08 PM

I have a Samsung 52" 1080P LCD and an old GeForce 5200FX that works great at 1920x1080 resolution and 60Hz. The TV automatically adjusts to the different resolution sizes while booting up (e.g. 640x480 on the Windows XP welcome screen). Hope that helps!
a b C Monitor
September 9, 2008 7:14:14 AM

My display is 70 Inch(Seven Zero Inch) HDTV
Display Conf: 1080P Resolution for PC and Video Application
includes : Blue-Ray and HD-DVD Playback @ 1080P
Text & Video are great :
"Very Large & Crips Workspace @ 70Inch Across"
I play games with it...(COD4, CRYSIS, GRID)


Connection: Video: DVI to HDMI
Video Card : BFG 8800GT 512 OC
Other cards I have tested: BFG 280 , 3870
I plan to get myself a 4970x2 Soon...

CPU: Quad Core 6600
OS: Windows Vista Ultimate
HD Tuner: TV Built In Tuner Plus/ ATI 650 HDTV(Dual Tuner)


Memory: 4 Gbyte
Motherboard: Asus Maximus Formula
Hard Drive: 2x 750Gbyte configured as Raid-0

It works great...

I hope it helps answer your question
!