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How compatible is 802.11b with 802.11g??

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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May 30, 2004 3:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a wireless card
for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to use it
at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz range
and therefore should be compatible.

I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.

Thank You Very Much

Oliver
May 30, 2004 3:13:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

802.11g is an extension of the 802.11b standard thus making them compatible.
To prove this, I set up a "g" network in my home and added a "b" print
server.
This setup works.
TW


"OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a wireless
card
> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to use
it
> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz range
> and therefore should be compatible.
>
> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
>
> Thank You Very Much
>
> Oliver
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 30, 2004 3:13:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

To clarify, 802.11g is NOT an extension of 802.11b. It is a entirely
different protocol; most 802.11g also will operate using the 802.11b
protocol. If you have a network that is 802.11g and you add any device that
is 802.11b, then the entire network will operate as an 802.11b network.

To answer the questing posed by the OP; yes, your card will work at the
university.

Bobby

"TW" <twilcken@msn.com> wrote in message
news:o UrNIJkREHA.644@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> 802.11g is an extension of the 802.11b standard thus making them
> compatible.
> To prove this, I set up a "g" network in my home and added a "b" print
> server.
> This setup works.
> TW
>
>
> "OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
> news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a wireless
> card
>> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to use
> it
>> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz range
>> and therefore should be compatible.
>>
>> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
>> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
>>
>> Thank You Very Much
>>
>> Oliver
>>
>>
>
>
Related resources
May 30, 2004 3:23:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Cards that are "g" capable will work in "b" environments.

"OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a wireless
card
> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to use
it
> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz range
> and therefore should be compatible.
>
> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
>
> Thank You Very Much
>
> Oliver
>
>
May 31, 2004 2:37:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

802.11g is suppose to be totally compatible with 802.11b

However in a presence of 802.11b signal, a typical 802.11g might loose
30-50% of its "Speed". I.e. 8021.g alone might yield 20Mb/sec. Add to the
same Network an 802.11b client and the 802.11g connection will go down to
12Mb/sec.

It probably will be corrected next year when the next standard will come
out.


Jack (MVP-Networking)

"NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
news:uD71jnnREHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> To clarify, 802.11g is NOT an extension of 802.11b. It is a entirely
> different protocol; most 802.11g also will operate using the 802.11b
> protocol. If you have a network that is 802.11g and you add any device
that
> is 802.11b, then the entire network will operate as an 802.11b network.
>
> To answer the questing posed by the OP; yes, your card will work at the
> university.
>
> Bobby
>
> "TW" <twilcken@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:o UrNIJkREHA.644@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > 802.11g is an extension of the 802.11b standard thus making them
> > compatible.
> > To prove this, I set up a "g" network in my home and added a "b" print
> > server.
> > This setup works.
> > TW
> >
> >
> > "OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
> > news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a wireless
> > card
> >> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to
use
> > it
> >> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz
range
> >> and therefore should be compatible.
> >>
> >> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
> >> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
> >>
> >> Thank You Very Much
> >>
> >> Oliver
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 31, 2004 2:37:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

802.11e and 802.11n are awaiting certification.

The majority of consumer (home) 802.11g/802.11b routers/APs will only
support one mode at a time...that is, as I stated earlier, if you have a
network that is operating as an 802.11g network (all devices are 802.11g ),
and you introduce a single 802.11b device, then the entire network will
default to 802.11b. While the "posted speed limit" of 802.11b is 11Mbps,
you will get nowhere near that in the real world. Average speed between
devices on a 802.11b network is somewhere in the vicinity 0f 5.5 to 6.5 Mbps
with a good, clean signal. You cannot expect to get 12Mbps LAN speeds on
any network that has 802.11b clients. The router will set the LAN speed to
what is specified in the lowest common protocol, which in this scenario is
802.11b. Unless your router/AP specifically supports mixed mode
environments, then an 802.11g device will only operate as an 802.11b.
Bobby


"Jack" <JackMDS@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:%23zF5FhrREHA.3628@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> 802.11g is suppose to be totally compatible with 802.11b
>
> However in a presence of 802.11b signal, a typical 802.11g might loose
> 30-50% of its "Speed". I.e. 8021.g alone might yield 20Mb/sec. Add to the
> same Network an 802.11b client and the 802.11g connection will go down to
> 12Mb/sec.
>
> It probably will be corrected next year when the next standard will come
> out.
>
>
> Jack (MVP-Networking)
>
> "NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
> news:uD71jnnREHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> To clarify, 802.11g is NOT an extension of 802.11b. It is a entirely
>> different protocol; most 802.11g also will operate using the 802.11b
>> protocol. If you have a network that is 802.11g and you add any device
> that
>> is 802.11b, then the entire network will operate as an 802.11b network.
>>
>> To answer the questing posed by the OP; yes, your card will work at the
>> university.
>>
>> Bobby
>>
>> "TW" <twilcken@msn.com> wrote in message
>> news:o UrNIJkREHA.644@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > 802.11g is an extension of the 802.11b standard thus making them
>> > compatible.
>> > To prove this, I set up a "g" network in my home and added a "b" print
>> > server.
>> > This setup works.
>> > TW
>> >
>> >
>> > "OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
>> > news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> >> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a
>> >> wireless
>> > card
>> >> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able to
> use
>> > it
>> >> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz
> range
>> >> and therefore should be compatible.
>> >>
>> >> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home so
>> >> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
>> >>
>> >> Thank You Very Much
>> >>
>> >> Oliver
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
May 31, 2004 2:15:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Right so I think all this information summerizes to this:

------------
-----------
| Place A | | Device w/ 802.11g Card | |
Place B |
| 802.11b |
| 802.11g |
------------
-----------


When I walk to place A it will work at 'b' standard.
When I walk to place B I will get full 'g' speed etc (as long as everything
else is g)

Thank You All Very Much

Oliver S



"NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
news:ubInvKsREHA.628@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> 802.11e and 802.11n are awaiting certification.
>
> The majority of consumer (home) 802.11g/802.11b routers/APs will only
> support one mode at a time...that is, as I stated earlier, if you have a
> network that is operating as an 802.11g network (all devices are
802.11g ),
> and you introduce a single 802.11b device, then the entire network will
> default to 802.11b. While the "posted speed limit" of 802.11b is 11Mbps,
> you will get nowhere near that in the real world. Average speed between
> devices on a 802.11b network is somewhere in the vicinity 0f 5.5 to 6.5
Mbps
> with a good, clean signal. You cannot expect to get 12Mbps LAN speeds on
> any network that has 802.11b clients. The router will set the LAN speed
to
> what is specified in the lowest common protocol, which in this scenario is
> 802.11b. Unless your router/AP specifically supports mixed mode
> environments, then an 802.11g device will only operate as an 802.11b.
> Bobby
>
>
> "Jack" <JackMDS@verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:%23zF5FhrREHA.3628@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > 802.11g is suppose to be totally compatible with 802.11b
> >
> > However in a presence of 802.11b signal, a typical 802.11g might loose
> > 30-50% of its "Speed". I.e. 8021.g alone might yield 20Mb/sec. Add to
the
> > same Network an 802.11b client and the 802.11g connection will go down
to
> > 12Mb/sec.
> >
> > It probably will be corrected next year when the next standard will come
> > out.
> >
> >
> > Jack (MVP-Networking)
> >
> > "NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
> > news:uD71jnnREHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> To clarify, 802.11g is NOT an extension of 802.11b. It is a entirely
> >> different protocol; most 802.11g also will operate using the 802.11b
> >> protocol. If you have a network that is 802.11g and you add any device
> > that
> >> is 802.11b, then the entire network will operate as an 802.11b network.
> >>
> >> To answer the questing posed by the OP; yes, your card will work at
the
> >> university.
> >>
> >> Bobby
> >>
> >> "TW" <twilcken@msn.com> wrote in message
> >> news:o UrNIJkREHA.644@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > 802.11g is an extension of the 802.11b standard thus making them
> >> > compatible.
> >> > To prove this, I set up a "g" network in my home and added a "b"
print
> >> > server.
> >> > This setup works.
> >> > TW
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "OS" <o@o.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:o EkSy6iREHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> >> My university is using IEEE 802.11b, therefore I need to buy a
> >> >> wireless
> >> > card
> >> >> for my pocket PC, my question is if I get a 802.11g will I be able
to
> > use
> >> > it
> >> >> at my university? I understand that both systems work in the 2.4Ghz
> > range
> >> >> and therefore should be compatible.
> >> >>
> >> >> I ask this question because I am going to get wireless for my home
so
> >> >> 802.11g would be a better option in terms of speed.
> >> >>
> >> >> Thank You Very Much
> >> >>
> >> >> Oliver
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
May 31, 2004 2:29:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

That did not go as planed! Try again:

| A | | Device w/ g | | B |
| 802.11b | | 802.11g |
May 31, 2004 4:09:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hello NoNoBadDog.

I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the 802.11g
version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups can
not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?

Thanks.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 31, 2004 4:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Good question. Cable modems are capped at 1.5Mbps (that is one and a half).
Obviously, that is far below the 11Mbps that b can deliver. The 11Mbps of
an 802.11b network, and 54Mbps speed of an 802.11 network are the speeds
between devices on the local network. It has nothing to do with the
download speed provided by your ISP. If you have cable, it is capped at
1.5Mbps. If you have DSL, you have either 768/1.5/3.0Mbps depending on
which package you are paying for. The advantage of G is that it has the
ability to use WPA, which offers much greater security the WEP. A pure G
network can also stream audio and video files between devices on the LAN
without lag. It makes no sense to go with B anymore, considering that B
offers a less secure environment, and that the prices of "G" equipment is
only slightly higher than "B".

Bobby

"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:eC0xamyREHA.2976@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hello NoNoBadDog.
>
> I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the 802.11g
> version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups can
> not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
May 31, 2004 6:37:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I think I know the answer. The "g" version has no advantage over the "b"
version as far as surfing the 'net is concerned - because, as I said, the
cable/DSL modems have a 11 Mbps limit. However, the "g" version is much
faster than the "b" version when it comes to computer-to-computer file
transfers within someone's LAN.

If your LAN uses a mix of the "b" and "g", then I think everything within
the LAN reverts to the speed of the "b" in the situation in which a "b"
furnished computer is communicating with a "g" furnished computer. What
about the wireless router that all computers in the LAN connect to (whether
wired or through the router's antennas)? This raises more questions.

Please correct me if I am wrong on my assumptions.

"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:eC0xamyREHA.2976@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hello NoNoBadDog.
>
> I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the 802.11g
> version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups can
> not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 31, 2004 6:37:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Papa...

You have it all correct, except that Cable is capped at 1.5Mbps (that is
one and a half). There is no consumer broadband option that will give you
11Mbps download speeds (at least not yet). DSL can get as high as 3 Mbps.

Bobby

"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:uaQkA5zREHA.1216@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>I think I know the answer. The "g" version has no advantage over the "b"
> version as far as surfing the 'net is concerned - because, as I said, the
> cable/DSL modems have a 11 Mbps limit. However, the "g" version is much
> faster than the "b" version when it comes to computer-to-computer file
> transfers within someone's LAN.
>
> If your LAN uses a mix of the "b" and "g", then I think everything within
> the LAN reverts to the speed of the "b" in the situation in which a "b"
> furnished computer is communicating with a "g" furnished computer. What
> about the wireless router that all computers in the LAN connect to
> (whether
> wired or through the router's antennas)? This raises more questions.
>
> Please correct me if I am wrong on my assumptions.
>
> "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
> news:eC0xamyREHA.2976@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Hello NoNoBadDog.
>>
>> I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the 802.11g
>> version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups can
>> not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>>
>
>
May 31, 2004 7:51:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

"NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
news:o yB4HY0REHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
>
> Papa...
>
> You have it all correct, except that Cable is capped at 1.5Mbps (that is
> one and a half). There is no consumer broadband option that will give you
> 11Mbps download speeds (at least not yet). DSL can get as high as 3 Mbps.
>
> Bobby
>
> "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
> news:uaQkA5zREHA.1216@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >I think I know the answer. The "g" version has no advantage over the "b"
> > version as far as surfing the 'net is concerned - because, as I said,
the
> > cable/DSL modems have a 11 Mbps limit. However, the "g" version is much
> > faster than the "b" version when it comes to computer-to-computer file
> > transfers within someone's LAN.
> >
> > If your LAN uses a mix of the "b" and "g", then I think everything
within
> > the LAN reverts to the speed of the "b" in the situation in which a "b"
> > furnished computer is communicating with a "g" furnished computer. What
> > about the wireless router that all computers in the LAN connect to
> > (whether
> > wired or through the router's antennas)? This raises more questions.
> >
> > Please correct me if I am wrong on my assumptions.
> >
> > "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
> > news:eC0xamyREHA.2976@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> Hello NoNoBadDog.
> >>
> >> I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the
802.11g
> >> version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups
can
> >> not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?
> >>
> >> Thanks.
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Hello again, Bobby:

Thanks for both responses, and for clearing up those wireless questions I
had.

Regards,

Papa
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 31, 2004 7:51:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

You're welcome!

Bobby

"Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
news:u$tmki0REHA.3944@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> "NoNoBadDog!" <nospam_bjsledge@pixi.com> wrote in message
> news:o yB4HY0REHA.3124@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>
>>
>> Papa...
>>
>> You have it all correct, except that Cable is capped at 1.5Mbps (that
>> is
>> one and a half). There is no consumer broadband option that will give
>> you
>> 11Mbps download speeds (at least not yet). DSL can get as high as 3
>> Mbps.
>>
>> Bobby
>>
>> "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
>> news:uaQkA5zREHA.1216@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >I think I know the answer. The "g" version has no advantage over the "b"
>> > version as far as surfing the 'net is concerned - because, as I said,
> the
>> > cable/DSL modems have a 11 Mbps limit. However, the "g" version is much
>> > faster than the "b" version when it comes to computer-to-computer file
>> > transfers within someone's LAN.
>> >
>> > If your LAN uses a mix of the "b" and "g", then I think everything
> within
>> > the LAN reverts to the speed of the "b" in the situation in which a "b"
>> > furnished computer is communicating with a "g" furnished computer. What
>> > about the wireless router that all computers in the LAN connect to
>> > (whether
>> > wired or through the router's antennas)? This raises more questions.
>> >
>> > Please correct me if I am wrong on my assumptions.
>> >
>> > "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
>> > news:eC0xamyREHA.2976@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> Hello NoNoBadDog.
>> >>
>> >> I read somewhere that there is no real advantage in going to the
> 802.11g
>> >> version rather than the 802.11b version because cable and DSL hookups
> can
>> >> not get beyond 11 Mbps anyway. Anything to that?
>> >>
>> >> Thanks.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
> Hello again, Bobby:
>
> Thanks for both responses, and for clearing up those wireless questions I
> had.
>
> Regards,
>
> Papa
>
>
!