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Converting my home LAN to wireless

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 1, 2004 11:46:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I have a home LAN connected through a cable modem router to my DSL modem.
Three computers and a printer have NIC's and I have a wire going through the
walls from my desk to my wife's desk.

The computers have XP Pro, and one computer also has XP Home on it (multi-boot).
As it is set up now, we can share lots of files, which is what we want.

When she replaced her computer with a lap top, she kept getting connected to
someone outside the house until I disabled the built-in wireless device. She
has dialed into our DSL provider on trips, but sometimes have a real hard time
with this. We have also plugged it into Kinkos.

I would like to gradually move towards the following goals:
1. Allow her to use her computer anywhere in the house - with me having access
to her files, but whomever down the street not having access.
2. When costs go down, add the ability to connect to wireless access points.

Actually, one day some guys came by our house offering wireless access through a
box on a telephone pole near by. But it wasn't cheaper for multiple computers,
and they didn't have dial-up service for away from the house.

The first couple of years after we moved here, we didn't have any broadband
available (and missed it). The last couple of years DSL was available. Right
now maybe cable is available, but when I respond to their ads, all I get are
salesmen who know nothing of substance.


What is a good plan for moving towards my goals?

--
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 1, 2004 11:46:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

From what I can tell, you only need a wireless router.
This way your wife's laptop can roam around the house and
access your network and the internet from anywhere....
the cost is approx 100 USD or sometimes even less.
When you decide to go this route, make sure you enable
security features on your wirless connection, so your
neighbors will not be tempted to read your shared files.
>-----Original Message-----
>I have a home LAN connected through a cable modem router
to my DSL modem.
>Three computers and a printer have NIC's and I have a
wire going through the
>walls from my desk to my wife's desk.
>
>The computers have XP Pro, and one computer also has XP
Home on it (multi-boot).
> As it is set up now, we can share lots of files,
which is what we want.
>
>When she replaced her computer with a lap top, she kept
getting connected to
>someone outside the house until I disabled the built-in
wireless device. She
>has dialed into our DSL provider on trips, but sometimes
have a real hard time
>with this. We have also plugged it into Kinkos.
>
>I would like to gradually move towards the following
goals:
>1. Allow her to use her computer anywhere in the
house - with me having access
>to her files, but whomever down the street not having
access.
>2. When costs go down, add the ability to connect to
wireless access points.
>
>Actually, one day some guys came by our house offering
wireless access through a
>box on a telephone pole near by. But it wasn't cheaper
for multiple computers,
>and they didn't have dial-up service for away from the
house.
>
>The first couple of years after we moved here, we didn't
have any broadband
>available (and missed it). The last couple of years
DSL was available. Right
>now maybe cable is available, but when I respond to
their ads, all I get are
>salesmen who know nothing of substance.
>
>
>What is a good plan for moving towards my goals?
>
>--
>People who hated this post may also hate posts by...
>.
>
June 1, 2004 11:46:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Your question is totally senseless. What does your LAN consist of? A
"cable modem router" is meaningless. Do you have a wireless router? If
not, then goal one is impossible. Goal 2 makes absolutely no sense.
How do you expect to achieve goal 1 without a wireless router? And
what do you mean that "she dialed in"? You don't dial in to a DSL
provider.

Please think through this again and then post something that makes
sense. Or are you just a troll?

Just guessing: You have a cable modem and a router without wireless
capability. If your new laptop with wireless capability is finding a
network, it is a neighbor's network. If you want your new laptop to
have access your network from "anywhere" then you need a wireless
router. And almost every wireless router has at least two, most have
four, wired LAN ports for your existing wired computers.

hawk

hawk

Howard Brazee wrote:

> I have a home LAN connected through a cable modem router to my DSL modem.
> Three computers and a printer have NIC's and I have a wire going through the
> walls from my desk to my wife's desk.
>
> The computers have XP Pro, and one computer also has XP Home on it (multi-boot).
> As it is set up now, we can share lots of files, which is what we want.
>
> When she replaced her computer with a lap top, she kept getting connected to
> someone outside the house until I disabled the built-in wireless device. She
> has dialed into our DSL provider on trips, but sometimes have a real hard time
> with this. We have also plugged it into Kinkos.
>
> I would like to gradually move towards the following goals:
> 1. Allow her to use her computer anywhere in the house - with me having access
> to her files, but whomever down the street not having access.
> 2. When costs go down, add the ability to connect to wireless access points.
>
> Actually, one day some guys came by our house offering wireless access through a
> box on a telephone pole near by. But it wasn't cheaper for multiple computers,
> and they didn't have dial-up service for away from the house.
>
> The first couple of years after we moved here, we didn't have any broadband
> available (and missed it). The last couple of years DSL was available. Right
> now maybe cable is available, but when I respond to their ads, all I get are
> salesmen who know nothing of substance.
>
>
> What is a good plan for moving towards my goals?
>
Related resources
June 1, 2004 11:46:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

There are two schools of thought: one suggests router another simply an access point. Mostly it depends on your starting point. That is, if you have nothing then buy an all in one solution - DSL Modem / Router / Wireless Router all-in-one.

If you already have a DSL modem, then bvuy a lesser product. One could also suggest that if you have an established LAN and DSL service running, then add in only a Wireless Access Point. However with XP Pro, setting this up may challenge some home computing folks.

My suggesting, for the relatively small price difference is to keep your current DSL modem and get a new combination router. If you look at a prduct such as the Netcomm NB300, a wireless router bridge for ADSL and Cable modems which delivers wireless and wired broadband sharing in one package.

The NB3000 connects to a cable or ADSL modem, enabling you to transmit your broadband wirelessly at 11Mbps, throughout your home. Not the fastest speed but non the less very acceptable.

The NB3000 includes a 4-port 10/100 Ethernet switch for connecting PCs or other devices on a wired LAN.

With a wireless range of up to 91 metres indoors.

To secure your home sevice from outside users, there is the 128-bit WEP encryption to ensure privacy. For extra security, make sure that you give the Access Point a unique name, not the generic that comes in the standard setup.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 2, 2004 7:27:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 1-Jun-2004, <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> From what I can tell, you only need a wireless router.
> This way your wife's laptop can roam around the house and
> access your network and the internet from anywhere....
> the cost is approx 100 USD or sometimes even less.
> When you decide to go this route, make sure you enable
> security features on your wirless connection, so your
> neighbors will not be tempted to read your shared files.

I would like to get this working ahead of time, with the wireless modem turned
on - testing to make sure I have access but the world doesn't.

And possibly testing to see if we can access the web at a Starbucks, if
possible.

--
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 2, 2004 7:43:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 1-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

> Your question is totally senseless.

I'm sorry, I put thought into my post and reviewed it for completeness. But if
I knew everything I wouldn't need to ask.

> What does your LAN consist of?

Three computers and a printer have NICs and are attached to my cable modem
router, which is connected to my DSL modem.

> A "cable modem router" is meaningless.

I don't name the products, take that up with marketing.

> Do you have a wireless router?

Not yet. I'm not certain whether I will buy this or just an access point. I
suspect I will replace my router. But first I want to set up all the software
and test it to make sure it is secure and that I can access my wife's computer
from my computer. I would also like to check to see if she can connect to the
web from a local Starbucks. Once it is working and secure, I will buy the
software.

> If not, then goal one is impossible.

You're saying that if I don't have a wireless router now, my goal of going
wireless is impossible? That makes absolutely no sense to me.

> Goal 2 makes absolutely no sense.

Access points are becoming ubiquitous. It would be nice if someday she can
take her lap top to Starbucks or MacDonalds and connect from there.

> How do you expect to achieve goal 1 without a wireless router?

I suppose I could buy some alternative to a wireless router. There appear to
be many. But I don't really understand the question - why should I limit my
solution that way?

>And what do you mean that "she dialed in"? You don't dial in to a DSL provider.

My DSL provider allows dial-up access, and even has an 800- phone number for
when she's at a location that doesn't have local access numbers. Dial-up
access is useful when we use it from remote locations. We have connected to a
Kinkos without dial-up though.

Your experience appears to be different.

> Please think through this again and then post something that makes sense.

I thought through this carefully then, and again now. I don't see where my
statement failed to make sense, but I admit that I am asking questions because I
don't know all the answers. To me, my questions made a lot more sense than
your answers did.

> Or are you just a troll?

No.

> Just guessing: You have a cable modem and a router without wireless
> capability.

No need to guess. That's what I said.

> If your new laptop with wireless capability is finding a
> network, it is a neighbor's network. If you want your new laptop to
> have access your network from "anywhere" then you need a wireless
> router.

The router is one alternative to accessing from anywhere in the house. I know
that much. What I am finding hard to get good instructions on is the security
needed that allows me to still access my wife's computer while her wireless
modem is turned on.

> And almost every wireless router has at least two, most have
> four, wired LAN ports for your existing wired computers.

The ones I've looked at have 4.

--
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June 2, 2004 7:43:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Sorry, you still make no sense in what you say you want to achieve.
Can your wife use her laptop to access the Internet from Starbucks?
Yes, if she has a wireless PC card installed.

Do you have to have a wireless router to establish a home network with
wireless capability? No, you could use a wireless access point, but
the cost of that will be the same as using a wireless router. And
using a wireless router will be a much simpler solution.

What do you mean, "But first I want to set up all the software and
test it to make sure it is secure and that I can access my wife's
computer from my computer."? This makes no sense. How do you intend to
access your wife's computer? What software do you intend to test? It
is still not clear what you want to achieve.

If you want a home network with wireless capability for your wife's
laptop, then you have to have wireless hardware of some sort, either
an access point or a router. If all you want is for your wife to be
able to access the Internet from Starbucks, then all you need is a
wireless PC card for her laptop. And you can switch between a wireless
card and a wired card for her laptop if you wanted her to access your
home network that doesn't have wireless capability.

Regards, hawk



Howard Brazee wrote:

> On 1-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Your question is totally senseless.
>
>
> I'm sorry, I put thought into my post and reviewed it for completeness. But if
> I knew everything I wouldn't need to ask.
>
>
>>What does your LAN consist of?
>
>
> Three computers and a printer have NICs and are attached to my cable modem
> router, which is connected to my DSL modem.
>
>
>>A "cable modem router" is meaningless.
>
>
> I don't name the products, take that up with marketing.
>
>
>>Do you have a wireless router?
>
>
> Not yet. I'm not certain whether I will buy this or just an access point. I
> suspect I will replace my router. But first I want to set up all the software
> and test it to make sure it is secure and that I can access my wife's computer
> from my computer. I would also like to check to see if she can connect to the
> web from a local Starbucks. Once it is working and secure, I will buy the
> software.
>
>
>>If not, then goal one is impossible.
>
>
> You're saying that if I don't have a wireless router now, my goal of going
> wireless is impossible? That makes absolutely no sense to me.
>
>
>>Goal 2 makes absolutely no sense.
>
>
> Access points are becoming ubiquitous. It would be nice if someday she can
> take her lap top to Starbucks or MacDonalds and connect from there.
>
>
>>How do you expect to achieve goal 1 without a wireless router?
>
>
> I suppose I could buy some alternative to a wireless router. There appear to
> be many. But I don't really understand the question - why should I limit my
> solution that way?
>
>
>>And what do you mean that "she dialed in"? You don't dial in to a DSL provider.
>
>
> My DSL provider allows dial-up access, and even has an 800- phone number for
> when she's at a location that doesn't have local access numbers. Dial-up
> access is useful when we use it from remote locations. We have connected to a
> Kinkos without dial-up though.
>
> Your experience appears to be different.
>
>
>>Please think through this again and then post something that makes sense.
>
>
> I thought through this carefully then, and again now. I don't see where my
> statement failed to make sense, but I admit that I am asking questions because I
> don't know all the answers. To me, my questions made a lot more sense than
> your answers did.
>
>
>>Or are you just a troll?
>
>
> No.
>
>
>>Just guessing: You have a cable modem and a router without wireless
>>capability.
>
>
> No need to guess. That's what I said.
>
>
>>If your new laptop with wireless capability is finding a
>>network, it is a neighbor's network. If you want your new laptop to
>>have access your network from "anywhere" then you need a wireless
>>router.
>
>
> The router is one alternative to accessing from anywhere in the house. I know
> that much. What I am finding hard to get good instructions on is the security
> needed that allows me to still access my wife's computer while her wireless
> modem is turned on.
>
>
>>And almost every wireless router has at least two, most have
>>four, wired LAN ports for your existing wired computers.
>
>
> The ones I've looked at have 4.
>
June 3, 2004 5:28:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 2-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

> Sorry, you still make no sense in what you say you want to achieve.
> Can your wife use her laptop to access the Internet from Starbucks?
> Yes, if she has a wireless PC card installed.

Please explain what I am saying wrong. I have read my posts carefully after
writing them, making sure they seem clear, but somehow I am not getting
through to you.

I mentioned that I turned off her wireless modem. She doesn't have a PC
card installed though, hers is the built in one that comes with Centrino
based notebooks.


> Do you have to have a wireless router to establish a home network with
> wireless capability? No, you could use a wireless access point, but
> the cost of that will be the same as using a wireless router. And
> using a wireless router will be a much simpler solution.

I figure that's what I will do. But only when I am satisfied with my
security needs.


> What do you mean, "But first I want to set up all the software and
> test it to make sure it is secure and that I can access my wife's
> computer from my computer."? This makes no sense. How do you intend to
> access your wife's computer? What software do you intend to test? It
> is still not clear what you want to achieve.

Hmmm. I don't know how I could have said that more clearly. I intend to
sit at my computer and copy files from hers to mine and visa versa.

I am going to test my security set-up by turning on security, turning on her
wireless modem, and verifying that I still have access to her computer and
nobody down the street does. I'm not sure how I can verify that nobody
down the street has access as I don't control what they do. I do know that
when we bought her computer she was occasionally connecting with someone
else. We don't want that.


> If you want a home network with wireless capability for your wife's
> laptop, then you have to have wireless hardware of some sort, either
> an access point or a router. If all you want is for your wife to be
> able to access the Internet from Starbucks, then all you need is a
> wireless PC card for her laptop. And you can switch between a wireless
> card and a wired card for her laptop if you wanted her to access your
> home network that doesn't have wireless capability.

I will eventually want both abilities. My first goal is to make her
computer secure with her wireless NIC on, but with me able to access her
computer from mine. After that I figure things will be trivial.
June 3, 2004 12:41:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

So, you want to have wife's laptop wired to your home network, and
still have her laptop's wireless active? Then you are going to test
security? Well, the only security you could test would be for a
network that your neighbor might have. It would be unlikely that your
wife's laptop would have the correct settings to make it part of that
network. The usual security concerns are for someone to get into your
wireless home network and have access to any shared files on any
computer in that network. Routers have "filters" of various sorts that
are used to prevent access to the network.

You really should do some basic research into wireless networks and
security concerns, etc. And at least try to get the correct
nomenclature, etc. PracticallyNetworked.com would be a good place to
start.

hawk


howard@brazee.net wrote:
> On 2-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Sorry, you still make no sense in what you say you want to achieve.
>>Can your wife use her laptop to access the Internet from Starbucks?
>>Yes, if she has a wireless PC card installed.
>
>
> Please explain what I am saying wrong. I have read my posts carefully after
> writing them, making sure they seem clear, but somehow I am not getting
> through to you.
>
> I mentioned that I turned off her wireless modem. She doesn't have a PC
> card installed though, hers is the built in one that comes with Centrino
> based notebooks.
>
>
>
>>Do you have to have a wireless router to establish a home network with
>>wireless capability? No, you could use a wireless access point, but
>>the cost of that will be the same as using a wireless router. And
>>using a wireless router will be a much simpler solution.
>
>
> I figure that's what I will do. But only when I am satisfied with my
> security needs.
>
>
>
>>What do you mean, "But first I want to set up all the software and
>>test it to make sure it is secure and that I can access my wife's
>>computer from my computer."? This makes no sense. How do you intend to
>>access your wife's computer? What software do you intend to test? It
>>is still not clear what you want to achieve.
>
>
> Hmmm. I don't know how I could have said that more clearly. I intend to
> sit at my computer and copy files from hers to mine and visa versa.
>
> I am going to test my security set-up by turning on security, turning on her
> wireless modem, and verifying that I still have access to her computer and
> nobody down the street does. I'm not sure how I can verify that nobody
> down the street has access as I don't control what they do. I do know that
> when we bought her computer she was occasionally connecting with someone
> else. We don't want that.
>
>
>
>>If you want a home network with wireless capability for your wife's
>>laptop, then you have to have wireless hardware of some sort, either
>>an access point or a router. If all you want is for your wife to be
>>able to access the Internet from Starbucks, then all you need is a
>>wireless PC card for her laptop. And you can switch between a wireless
>>card and a wired card for her laptop if you wanted her to access your
>>home network that doesn't have wireless capability.
>
>
> I will eventually want both abilities. My first goal is to make her
> computer secure with her wireless NIC on, but with me able to access her
> computer from mine. After that I figure things will be trivial.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 8, 2004 6:43:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 3-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

> So, you want to have wife's laptop wired to your home network, and
> still have her laptop's wireless active? Then you are going to test
> security? Well, the only security you could test would be for a
> network that your neighbor might have. It would be unlikely that your
> wife's laptop would have the correct settings to make it part of that
> network. The usual security concerns are for someone to get into your
> wireless home network and have access to any shared files on any
> computer in that network. Routers have "filters" of various sorts that
> are used to prevent access to the network.

All I know is that when her wireless modem was turned on, and she was connected
to our wireless LAN, I saw evidence that outsiders were connected to her
computer. I immediately turned it off, and am trying to figure out security
settings before turning it back on.

> You really should do some basic research into wireless networks and
> security concerns, etc. And at least try to get the correct
> nomenclature, etc. PracticallyNetworked.com would be a good place to
> start.

That was the first thing I did, before I posted here. Actually I also went
through that site before I created my LAN a couple of years ago. Security for
wired LANS is pretty straight forward. I haven't been able to find out what I
want to know about security with hot spots combined with a home LAN.
June 8, 2004 8:36:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Does she actually have a wireless modem? The kind that you use with a
cell phone company to get internet access? If so, I think it is
unlikely that anyone could connect to your home network through her
computer. When she dials in with the wireless modem, she is joining
the private network of the cell phone company. Others might "listen
in" as they can with any cell phone, but I think it is unlikely that
they could use her computer as a gateway into your home network. What
evidence do you have that outsiders were connected to her computer?

If you have a wireless router for your home network, it is easy to set
it up to prevent unauthorized access. Most routers have MAC or IP
address filters that can be used to grant or deny access to the
router, or even grant or deny internet access to computers that are
granted access to the router. In addition WEP encryption is an
additional layer of security. Any user that doesn't have the correct
WEP key is denied access to the network.

Motels and other public hot spots use a wireless router that is set up
to grant internet access, but deny access to the router or to the
network. So when you connect to the internet at one of these
locations, you cannot do any mischief to the router or even see any
other connected computer.

It is still not clear what your configuration is. In early posts you
said that you did not have a wireless home network, but in this latest
post you talk about a wireless LAN.

hawk



Howard Brazee wrote:
> On 3-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:
>
>
>>So, you want to have wife's laptop wired to your home network, and
>>still have her laptop's wireless active? Then you are going to test
>>security? Well, the only security you could test would be for a
>>network that your neighbor might have. It would be unlikely that your
>>wife's laptop would have the correct settings to make it part of that
>>network. The usual security concerns are for someone to get into your
>>wireless home network and have access to any shared files on any
>>computer in that network. Routers have "filters" of various sorts that
>>are used to prevent access to the network.
>
>
> All I know is that when her wireless modem was turned on, and she was connected
> to our wireless LAN, I saw evidence that outsiders were connected to her
> computer. I immediately turned it off, and am trying to figure out security
> settings before turning it back on.
>
>
>>You really should do some basic research into wireless networks and
>>security concerns, etc. And at least try to get the correct
>>nomenclature, etc. PracticallyNetworked.com would be a good place to
>>start.
>
>
> That was the first thing I did, before I posted here. Actually I also went
> through that site before I created my LAN a couple of years ago. Security for
> wired LANS is pretty straight forward. I haven't been able to find out what I
> want to know about security with hot spots combined with a home LAN.
June 9, 2004 4:08:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 8-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

> Does she actually have a wireless modem? The kind that you use with a
> cell phone company to get internet access?

Not that kind. The kind that is built into Centrino based computers.

> If so, I think it is
> unlikely that anyone could connect to your home network through her
> computer. When she dials in with the wireless modem, she is joining
> the private network of the cell phone company. Others might "listen
> in" as they can with any cell phone, but I think it is unlikely that
> they could use her computer as a gateway into your home network. What
> evidence do you have that outsiders were connected to her computer?

For one thing, Network Neighborhood showed strangers.


> It is still not clear what your configuration is. In early posts you
> said that you did not have a wireless home network, but in this latest
> post you talk about a wireless LAN.

Right now our LAN is wired. I turned her wireless modem off and it
performs correctly with us accessing each other's computer and nobody else
shows up. I want to set things up in this order:

1. I set up security better - without losing access to each other's
computers (file copying mainly).
2. I turn on her wireless modem and nobody else accesses her computer.
3. She takes her computer to a hot spot and without doing a bunch of work,
accesses the internet.
4. I replace my router with a wireless router at home, allowing her to work
anyplace at home.
June 9, 2004 4:08:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

You know, part of the problem is that don't use proper terminology.
Your wife's laptop doesn't have a "wireless modem" and I don't care
what the box says. If she is not using a cell phone company's network
to "dial" in to the internet, she must be using a simple Network
Interface Card (NIC). The NIC hardware/software scans for local
signals and connects to a network that it finds, either automatically
or at user request. The signal it finds would be from a wireless
router somewhere in your immediate area. (Probably from within a few
hundred feet.) If she is really seeing other computers in Network
Neighborhood, they must be from that network. Someone set up a
wireless router and just used default settings, so any computer with a
wireless NIC close by with default settings will "join" the network.

As I said in the last post, you can set up a wireless router to grant
or deny access to the router, the network, the internet, etc. base on
MAC or IP addresses. And you can use WEP which is an encryption
technique to prevent anyone from "reading" any information from your
home network.

The wireless NIC in the laptop should scan and connect to any "hot
spot" with no setup required. I use mine all the time at motels, etc.
when I travel. I just start the computer, use the NIC software to scan
for signals and then join the signal that it finds. No fuss, no muss.
And routers at these locations are set up to deny access to anything
except the internet. You can't "see" the router or any of the other
computers that are connected.

Just quit being a worry wort, go buy a wireless router, read the
manual, set it up to be secure and enjoy.

hawk

howard@brazee.net wrote:
> On 8-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Does she actually have a wireless modem? The kind that you use with a
>>cell phone company to get internet access?
>
>
> Not that kind. The kind that is built into Centrino based computers.
>
>
>>If so, I think it is
>>unlikely that anyone could connect to your home network through her
>>computer. When she dials in with the wireless modem, she is joining
>>the private network of the cell phone company. Others might "listen
>>in" as they can with any cell phone, but I think it is unlikely that
>>they could use her computer as a gateway into your home network. What
>>evidence do you have that outsiders were connected to her computer?
>
>
> For one thing, Network Neighborhood showed strangers.
>
>
>
>>It is still not clear what your configuration is. In early posts you
>>said that you did not have a wireless home network, but in this latest
>>post you talk about a wireless LAN.
>
>
> Right now our LAN is wired. I turned her wireless modem off and it
> performs correctly with us accessing each other's computer and nobody else
> shows up. I want to set things up in this order:
>
> 1. I set up security better - without losing access to each other's
> computers (file copying mainly).
> 2. I turn on her wireless modem and nobody else accesses her computer.
> 3. She takes her computer to a hot spot and without doing a bunch of work,
> accesses the internet.
> 4. I replace my router with a wireless router at home, allowing her to work
> anyplace at home.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
June 10, 2004 6:12:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

On 9-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

> As I said in the last post, you can set up a wireless router to grant
> or deny access to the router, the network, the internet, etc. base on
> MAC or IP addresses. And you can use WEP which is an encryption
> technique to prevent anyone from "reading" any information from your
> home network.

OK. I need to install WEP before she takes her computer to a hot spot. It's
not important that she be able to move her computer around the house, so I'm not
in a hurry to buy a wireless router. I'll get around to that someday. As
long as she can use hot spots with security, I will be satisfied (provided that
when she's plugged into our LAN, we can continue to share files between our
computers).

I was under the impression that WEP needed to be installed with a wireless
router, which obviously wouldn't make it something useful at Starbucks.
June 10, 2004 6:12:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

If you want to use the computer at Starbucks, WEP won't do anything
for you. WEP is something that keeps your home network safe from
intruders. It is a program in the router and any wireless computer
must have the correct WEP key before it can access the router or any
router functions.

What I do in addition to MAC and IP address filters and/or WEP is to
enable sharing on only one folder. Then if I want to share a
particular file, I copy it to that folder. When I am through, I delete
the copy. This would prevent anyone at Starbucks from seeing anything
but that folder. You could also just disable sharing completely when
at Starbucks and then enable sharing when at home. This is a quick and
easy thing to do.

But as I said, public hotspots have their routers set up to deny
any network access except for the internet. If you go to Starbucks and
look for a network neighborhood, you will not find any computers. You
will not be able to connect to the router. Unless you have national
security secrets on your computer, you should be secure at Starbucks.

Howard Brazee wrote:

> On 9-Jun-2004, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:
>
>
>>As I said in the last post, you can set up a wireless router to grant
>>or deny access to the router, the network, the internet, etc. base on
>>MAC or IP addresses. And you can use WEP which is an encryption
>>technique to prevent anyone from "reading" any information from your
>>home network.
>
>
> OK. I need to install WEP before she takes her computer to a hot spot. It's
> not important that she be able to move her computer around the house, so I'm not
> in a hurry to buy a wireless router. I'll get around to that someday. As
> long as she can use hot spots with security, I will be satisfied (provided that
> when she's plugged into our LAN, we can continue to share files between our
> computers).
>
> I was under the impression that WEP needed to be installed with a wireless
> router, which obviously wouldn't make it something useful at Starbucks.
!