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Ubuntu 11.10 Will Feature ARM Support, Ships Soon

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October 8, 2011 3:40:31 AM

Ships?
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October 8, 2011 4:08:51 AM

Cool!Ubuntu on tablet.
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October 8, 2011 4:20:06 AM

I use Ubuntu 10.04 only for my aging Turion X2 laptop merely because it gives me peace of mind in terms of security, particularly since laptops are meant to go places, connect to public networks, and be exposed to all sorts of USB thumb drives. 10.10 doesn't offer enough incentive for me to switch, and 11.04 doesn't seem to display correctly on the machine. That said, I'm not sure 11.10 will make things easier. I'm probably gonna try it but only after a few months; after they've ironed out some bugs.
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October 8, 2011 4:34:09 AM

I hope they 've done something about the battery usage issue of ubuntu 11.04 (natty). Looking forward...
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October 8, 2011 4:40:12 AM

Its as if ARM support is the new hot thing in town. Not that it's bad or anything.
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October 8, 2011 4:44:31 AM

Hopefully the unity desktop will work properly on release... I still shudder thinking of the glitches I had in unity, particularly before switching from 3d to 2d...
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October 8, 2011 4:47:49 AM

I'll think twice before upgrading from 10.10 on my netbook or 11.04 on my desktop - both run just fine. However...

Quote:
I know none of you are building your cloud on ARM architecture yet


F*** off with your "cloud". I'm not building any "clouds"... I hate it when Canonical jumps on the hype train and starts spreading the same BS like everyone else.
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October 8, 2011 5:33:27 AM

I can barely run Unity on my Turion x2 laptop. Even tried Unity 2d still doesn't want to run well.
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October 8, 2011 7:20:28 AM

jetjlI can barely run Unity on my Turion x2 laptop. Even tried Unity 2d still doesn't want to run well.


My computer could run it fine, I just didn't like it.

I installed Ubuntu on my computer to test it out, see what it was all about (dual booted) and got right into learning the considerably different UI setup.

Basically had it ironed out and then installed the update (along with proper drivers for my GFX card) and was immediately taken aback. Didn't have a clue how to customize the little launch bar (its placement or its icons) so I just switched back as soon as I figured out how.
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October 8, 2011 10:30:21 AM

jetjlI can barely run Unity on my Turion x2 laptop. Even tried Unity 2d still doesn't want to run well.

Then you most likely have an hardware problem. I have an old Pentium M 1.6GHz with the awful integrated extreme graphics 2, no dedicated GPU, and it runs really well, way faster than XP.
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October 8, 2011 1:54:36 PM

Long Live Open Source, Long Live Ubuntu
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Anonymous
October 8, 2011 2:34:10 PM

Ubuntu is a great distro, but unfortunately, the Linux Kernel 3.0 it ships with has a whole slew of serious regressions. If 11.10 doesn't work out for any of you, you probably ought to stick with either 11.04, or even 10.04.
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October 8, 2011 3:41:15 PM

reggierayLong Live Open Source, Long Live Ubuntu

I'm really not sure that a hot hard drive is a bad thing.
http://arstechnica.com/old/content/2007/02/8917.ars
"The researchers also found that drive failures did not increase with high temperatures or CPU utilization. In fact, they say, lower average temperatures actually correlate more strongly with failure. Only at 'very high temperatures' does this change."
The fact that it is Wubi actually could be part of it, but it seems unlikely that Ubuntu would heat up a drive any more than another OS, but I'm no expert.
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October 8, 2011 3:41:57 PM

ZingamIt appears that Ubuntu (any recent version) heats up my hard drive. Have you noticed this issue? Or maybe it is because I use it as a Wubi installation.


Wow, I quoted the wrong person. My bad.

I'm really not sure that a hot hard drive is a bad thing.
http://arstechnica.com/old/content/2007/02/8917.ars
"The researchers also found that drive failures did not increase with high temperatures or CPU utilization. In fact, they say, lower average temperatures actually correlate more strongly with failure. Only at 'very high temperatures' does this change."
The fact that it is Wubi actually could be part of it, but it seems unlikely that Ubuntu would heat up a drive any more than another OS, but I'm no expert.
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October 8, 2011 4:16:12 PM

Cloud computing isn't new. It's been around since the 80's (possibly the 70's). IBM is the king at cloud computing... trust them, it can't be done with the same expectations that people have of their computers today.

And to the comment above me, there is NO air for tempature to matter in a hard drive. They are VACUUM sealed so even if it gets hot or cold, the platters and heads could care less
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October 8, 2011 4:27:33 PM

AntilycusCloud computing isn't new. It's been around since the 80's (possibly the 70's). IBM is the king at cloud computing... trust them, it can't be done with the same expectations that people have of their computers today.And to the comment above me, there is NO air for tempature to matter in a hard drive. They are VACUUM sealed so even if it gets hot or cold, the platters and heads could care less


Air is not needed for temperature. Surely you realize this? Heat can transfer via conduction, so even if your hard drive is vacuum sealed, heat can transfer very effectively through the metal casing and into the metal interior. Air is a very inefficient way of heating things up by comparison to metal. If that heat causes expansion, the platters and heads can care very much.
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October 8, 2011 5:19:28 PM

Just thought I'd point it out, but they don't vacuum seal Hard drives, they are built in clean-rooms. Main difference is no dust, not no air. someone can feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on this one though.
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October 8, 2011 5:32:41 PM

Actually, not only are hard drives not vacuum-sealed, they are incapable of operating in a vacuum. The air around the platters in integral to the mechanism that allows the heads to fly just above the platters without touching them. If you put an HD in a vacuum chamber and start reducing the pressure, at some point the heads will no longer have enough air to maintain their proper flying height, resulting in a head crash, which is instantly and catastrophically fatal to the drive.
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October 8, 2011 7:03:12 PM

That's what I thought.. but I didn't have the actual knowledge to point that out.
cldebuhrActually, not only are hard drives not vacuum-sealed, they are incapable of operating in a vacuum. The air around the platters in integral to the mechanism that allows the heads to fly just above the platters without touching them. If you put an HD in a vacuum chamber and start reducing the pressure, at some point the heads will no longer have enough air to maintain their proper flying height, resulting in a head crash, which is instantly and catastrophically fatal to the drive.

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October 8, 2011 7:21:49 PM

having hard time to install flash on 10.04 x64. Can't thinking of upgrading to anything else as the packages I'm using now are very version picky.
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October 8, 2011 7:28:54 PM

lockhrt999having hard time to install flash on 10.04 x64. Can't thinking of upgrading to anything else as the packages I'm using now are very version picky.

Wait... so you're complaining about not being able to effectively use flash because you're using 10.04, but then you're talking about how you won't upgrade because certain packages are very version picky. This makes no sense. Either complain about flash and be glad you're moving up, or complain about the version numbers and say you can't... I don't understand your comment's intent. haha, but if your computer has a decent amount of RAM you could do a fresh 11.10 install and then run a 10.04 virtual machine for those certain packages quite easily.
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October 8, 2011 7:49:16 PM

coder543Wait... so you're complaining about not being able to effectively use flash because you're using 10.04, but then you're talking about how you won't upgrade because certain packages are very version picky. This makes no sense. Either complain about flash and be glad you're moving up, or complain about the version numbers and say you can't... I don't understand your comment's intent. haha, but if your computer has a decent amount of RAM you could do a fresh 11.10 install and then run a 10.04 virtual machine for those certain packages quite easily.


The software I need to run only on 10.04 so I was end up having downgraded from 11.xx version. And on this system flash is crucial to have. I simply can't have one instance entirely for flash and another for those software. That will be ridiculous.
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October 8, 2011 7:51:40 PM

That was not the suggestion. I was stating that your host operating system should be 11.10 and that 10.04 would be in a virtual machine, not 2 instances and a host. But, you should download the full Google Chrome.. it should have a flash player built into it, so hopefully that would work. (Chromium is not the same)
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October 8, 2011 7:52:22 PM

(and 11.10 not just for flash. Much of the more recent software is not available for 10.04)
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October 8, 2011 8:27:40 PM

coder543That was not the suggestion. I was stating that your host operating system should be 11.10 and that 10.04 would be in a virtual machine, not 2 instances and a host. But, you should download the full Google Chrome.. it should have a flash player built into it, so hopefully that would work. (Chromium is not the same)


Nope chrome for linux doesn't come with flash. We have to install manually. Secondly we can't install x86 flash on it. It has to be a x64 version and it's still in beta from many years. Adobe doesn't produce debian so process is much complicated for Ubuntu.
The software I run is a both cpu and gpu intensive so can't run it in VM either.
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October 9, 2011 12:40:16 AM

AntilycusAnd to the comment above me, there is NO air for tempature to matter in a hard drive. They are VACUUM sealed so even if it gets hot or cold, the platters and heads could care less

Hard drives are not vacuum sealed because they rely on air pressure for the heads to maintain a proper height when the platter is rotating. without if the heads would crash on the platter, damaging it and loosing data.
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October 9, 2011 12:44:11 AM

lockhrt999Nope chrome for linux doesn't come with flash. We have to install manually. Secondly we can't install x86 flash on it. It has to be a x64 version and it's still in beta from many years. Adobe doesn't produce debian so process is much complicated for Ubuntu.The software I run is a both cpu and gpu intensive so can't run it in VM either.

Even though adobe doesn't provide deb packages there are PPA's like SevenMachines that have the latest version of flash 11, including the 64 bit version of the player that isn't beta anymore.
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October 9, 2011 2:37:00 AM

lockhrt999Nope chrome for linux doesn't come with flash. We have to install manually. Secondly we can't install x86 flash on it. It has to be a x64 version and it's still in beta from many years. Adobe doesn't produce debian so process is much complicated for Ubuntu.The software I run is a both cpu and gpu intensive so can't run it in VM either.


The 64bit version of Chrome is the one that doesn't come with a built in flash (the 32-bit Chrome for Linux does come with flash built in). That's because there was no final stable version of 64bit flash for 64bit Ubuntu - until today! 64bit Chrome should soon begin shipping with 64bit flash included.

As for installing flash on your 64bit Ubuntu, that should no longer be a problem as of today. About an hour ago, I found flash updates waiting in my 32bit Ubuntu 11.04 and my 64bit 10.04 (I have both OS versions installed on the same machine in dual boot configuration and I had previously used Ubuntu's Software Center to install 32bit flash in both the 32bit OS and 64bit OS). The good news is that the flash update for 64bit Ubuntu 10.04 automatically updated the flash from version 10.3 (32bit) to version 11.01 (64bit). So if you're using a 64bit version of Ubuntu, you'll get the 64bit version of flash installed by default once you install flash from the Software Center from now on.





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October 9, 2011 8:00:42 PM

Nearer to the day when I can run my Linux programs on my Galaxy Tab, sweet.
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October 9, 2011 9:24:53 PM

Will Ubuntu One stay the same?
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!