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Adding Win7 and new boot SSD while keeping old OSes

Last response: in Windows 7
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a b $ Windows 7
December 7, 2010 4:03:40 PM

Short version: I want to install Windows 7 on my new SSD, which will be the boot drive, without losing the ability to boot my older OS installs on HD. To complicate things, I have been told (maybe wrongly) to disable all HDs when installing 7 on an SSD, to keep parts of the package off the HDs.

Long version: I am currently triple-booting DOS, XP, and a disposable Windows 7 partition off a Velociraptor. I received a gift of $$, and blew it on an SSD (Crucial RealSSD C300 128GB, if it matters). I want to do a fresh install of Windows 7 on this SSD, and make the SSD the boot device, and still be able to boot DOS and XP off the hard drive.

First, I'm not sure that doing an "additional OS" install on a new drive will make the new drive the boot drive. Second, I have read that it's better to disconnect HDs when installing 7 on an SSD, otherwise parts of the installation package will end up on the HD. Seems odd to me, but...

So how can I install Windows 7 on a single-disk system with the SSD, and then inform its boot list that it should include the NTLDR on the Velociraptor as a choice for "previous version of OS?" Or is the advice to disconnect HDs during SSD install bogus, and I can just install it as another OS? And would that migrate the boot device to my SSD or leave it on the original HD?

Many thanks in advance
-Peter

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a b $ Windows 7
December 7, 2010 6:47:56 PM

The advice you have been given to install on the ssd and disconnect all other hdd's is valid. Installing with the other hdd's connected would mean that the boot files will finish up on one of the other drives and a delay in boot time. Not what you want when spending $$$ on a ssd.
The easiest way would be to install W7 on the ssd on it's own and reconnect the drives when finished. You can then enter the bios and change the drive boot order to the original boot drive when you need the other os.
Or you can download a free bootmanager like EasyBCD.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 7, 2010 6:53:22 PM

Jonmor68:
All true, but I'm lazy. I was hoping to integrate the old drives into the Windows 7 boot management on the SSD, and save myself the additional layer of a third-party boot manager. One less therblig. I should have been clearer in the original post.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 8, 2010 12:18:48 PM

Hello WyomingKnott;
EasyBCD does not actually create an 'additional layer'. It just lets you easily edit the boot manager files just as you could do yourself with notepad. There is no extra running program, process or system service running on your system.
EasyBCD http://download.cnet.com/EasyBCD/3000-2094_4-10556865.h...

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a b $ Windows 7
December 8, 2010 3:25:58 PM

WR2 said:
Hello WyomingKnott;
EasyBCD does not actually create an 'additional layer'. It just lets you easily edit the boot manager files just as you could do yourself with notepad. There is no extra running program, process or system service running on your system.
EasyBCD http://download.cnet.com/EasyBCD/3000-2094_4-10556865.h...

http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/7637/easybcd.jpg


My bad - I should have looked before assuming "Boot manager" meant software that runs at boot time. WR2, thanks for the clarification, but I have to give the "best answer" to the original responder.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 8, 2010 3:26:19 PM

Best answer selected by WyomingKnott.
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