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lighting probs with Olympus C4000z

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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April 4, 2004 2:28:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Hi,

Olympus c4000Z
I must say I'm very pleased with my Olympus, it does the jobs I like it
to do but on one occasion .... picture this: performance of a heavy rock
group on a stage with lot's of light-spots, backgroud in very large red
and white stripes.
Well, whatever configuratuion I try I never get good pictures of them.
I know these spots are confusing lightmetering so I try to avoid them in
the vieuwfinder, and I know these guys are always moving ( they are
rockers !! ).
The exposures are always with too dark and there's a ver bad red collor
over them coming from the red colored fabric of the backgrouns I
presume). Not to mention the pics aren't sharp, not only because of the
moving of the objects ( very inspired rockers ) but also by the lack of
focus.

I now wonder if there are some settings I have to keep in mind to make
this kind of pictures. I just tought of using the "sports" settings ...
but I didn't try it till now.

All tips welcome.

Sorry for my bad English ...

--
All the best from Vito
******************************
Flanders - Belgium
******************************
Anonymous
April 4, 2004 8:11:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

"Vito" <vito.removethis@tiscali.be> wrote in message
news:c4ogv3$371$1@news.worldonline.be...
> Hi,
>
> Olympus c4000Z
> I must say I'm very pleased with my Olympus, it does the jobs I like it
> to do but on one occasion .... picture this: performance of a heavy rock
> group on a stage with lot's of light-spots, backgroud in very large red
> and white stripes.
> Well, whatever configuratuion I try I never get good pictures of them.
> I know these spots are confusing lightmetering so I try to avoid them in
> the vieuwfinder, and I know these guys are always moving ( they are
> rockers !! ).
> The exposures are always with too dark and there's a ver bad red collor
> over them coming from the red colored fabric of the backgrouns I
> presume). Not to mention the pics aren't sharp, not only because of the
> moving of the objects ( very inspired rockers ) but also by the lack of
> focus.
>
> I now wonder if there are some settings I have to keep in mind to make
> this kind of pictures. I just tought of using the "sports" settings ...
> but I didn't try it till now.
>
> All tips welcome.
>
> Sorry for my bad English ...
>
> --
> All the best from Vito
> ******************************
> Flanders - Belgium
> ******************************
The overall reddish yellow tint is coming from the stage lighting which is
Tungsten or Incandescent lights. If you set your White Balance(WB) to
Tungsten or Incandescent, you will get rid of most of the Reddish yellow
tint.

You also might try setting your EV to +1 to +1.5 to lighten the images.
Look at the LCD to see what you are getting!!.

The stage lighting is not as bright as sunlight, so the exposure to the
camera is much lower.

You might try setting the ISO of the camera to the highest setting the
camera has to get the maximum exposure in the light condition of stage
lighting. You might try setting the camera to aperture priority and open the
lens to the maximum open (low number).

A monopod is also a good tool to have in low light conditions, it helps you
hold the camera still for slow shutter speeds.

If you can get within 10-15 feet (3-4.5 meters) of the stage, then set the
camera WB to Daylight or Auto and use flash.

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
April 5, 2004 3:19:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

CSM1 wrote:

> The overall reddish yellow tint is coming from the stage lighting which is
> Tungsten or Incandescent lights. If you set your White Balance(WB) to
> Tungsten or Incandescent, you will get rid of most of the Reddish yellow
> tint.
>
> You also might try setting your EV to +1 to +1.5 to lighten the images.
> Look at the LCD to see what you are getting!!.
>
> The stage lighting is not as bright as sunlight, so the exposure to the
> camera is much lower.
>
> You might try setting the ISO of the camera to the highest setting the
> camera has to get the maximum exposure in the light condition of stage
> lighting. You might try setting the camera to aperture priority and open the
> lens to the maximum open (low number).
>
> A monopod is also a good tool to have in low light conditions, it helps you
> hold the camera still for slow shutter speeds.
>
> If you can get within 10-15 feet (3-4.5 meters) of the stage, then set the
> camera WB to Daylight or Auto and use flash.
>

Thanks for your reply, I'm going to keep these things in mind. Until now
I only used the Olympus for everyday use ( vacation pix and a few
parties ) but now it came to the real work it seems I have to learn a
lot about digital cameras :-)


--
All the best from Vito
******************************
Flanders - Belgium
******************************
!