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High ISO vs slow shutter speed, and click-to-capture delay..

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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April 5, 2004 6:46:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

Hi everyones. Thanks to read.
I'm new to digital photography. I'm familiar and work easily since 3 years
with graphics apps like PaintShop Pro to restore photos and make animated
GIFS, but photography itself is not what i'm familiar with. In may or june,
i plan to buy my first digicam so i started to do my homework and checked
the specs and infos about many cameras. Among the interesting URLs i've
found, those are worth mentioning:
http://www.epinions.com/Digital_Cameras
http://www.dpreview.com/

Among the features i wanted, an higher than 3x optical zoom was the starting
point for my search. In the consumer side cameras, there's a limited range
to choose from. The two models that seems to meet my needs and that i've
retained on my wishlist yet are the DX6490 from Kodak and the coolpix 5700
from Nikon. Ok now to go to the point, there's four questions yet that i
need to clarify. First, about the ISO rating. If i understand correctly what
i've read on the subject yet, if i have a camera that can shoot at an higher
ISO equivalent, the shutter speed then don't have to be slower, so photos i
take in darker areas (like at dusk outside,for example) have a better chance
of success even if i dont use a tripod and my hands moves a little during
capture...isn't it? If i'm perfectly stand still...can i make also a very
good picture in a darker place just by using slower shutter speed rather
than a high ISO setting? I've read that there's an increase in noise in the
image on almost all cameras when an higher ISO like 800 or even 400 is used.
Unfortunately on the Kodak web site, the sample photos from the DX6490 where
shot with ISO settings between 80 and 200 ISO (as seen in the metadata from
the samples) so of course all the photos looks very good...they want to show
the best of their products...not the worse! :-) Anyone can point me
somewhere with a URL toward some high-ISO samples from those models. I want
to see how bad is the noise at that level.

Second question, what is considered "good" speaking of the click to capture
delay? In 2003, a friend bought the Pentax Optio 430RS and there was a huge
delay (1½~2seconds) from the time the button is depressed and that the image
capture occurs. I dont speak about the time that the sample appears on the
LCD screen (wich is longer!) but really speak about the time from when the
button is depressed and when the photoflash is triggered. Even in a full
daylight scene without the flash, the delay seems to be the same. Kodak
states that the click to capture delay is .65 seconds for the DX6490. Is
this considered "good" or "standard" for most consumer digicams?


Third question is more simple to ask (although maybe not easy to answer!).
What are the effects of using the camera in the cold outside? In mean cold
like 5°F (-15°C). Most are equipped with LCD screen that bears the
description of "Low-temp. polysilicon TFT LCD"...but this doesn't tell what
is the operating temperature range of the whole camera, a thing Kodak and
Nikon doesn't specify for this model.

Last question is about power. The DC input jack that the DX6490 is having on
it's side (like many other cameras)...what it's used for exactly? It is to
power the digicam, to recharge the battery or both? I ask because if in a
few years from now the battery may becomes rare to find like it's the case
for many "old" electronic equipment. I woul like then to power the camera
from an external battery/voltage regulator assembly. I did that for a friend
for it's camcorder. The original Ni-Cad battery pack was rare and very
expensive to replace, so i designed a system for him consisting of and
external inexpensive 6 Volts sealed lead-acid battery attached to a belt
clip, and a charger for the battery. He now have 4 times the amp/hour
capacity he had before with the original battery pack. If an "old" digicam
can be powered by an external AC/DC adapter plugged to the DC input jack,
then the same design could be used.


No more questions for now. Still there!! Thanks a lot in advance for any
useful replies.

--
Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
Montréal Québec
PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
i'm a "pure" french canadian! :-)
Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
(If replying also by e-mail, remove
"no spam" from the adress.)
Anonymous
April 6, 2004 12:07:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.dcameras (More info?)

KILOWATT" <kilowatt"nospam typed:

> Hi everyones. Thanks to read.
> I'm new to digital photography. I'm familiar and work easily since 3
> years with graphics apps like PaintShop Pro to restore photos and
> make animated GIFS, but photography itself is not what i'm familiar
> with. In may or june, i plan to buy my first digicam so i started to
> do my homework and checked the specs and infos about many cameras.
> Among the interesting URLs i've found, those are worth mentioning:
> http://www.epinions.com/Digital_Cameras
> http://www.dpreview.com/
>
> Among the features i wanted, an higher than 3x optical zoom was the
> starting point for my search. In the consumer side cameras, there's a
> limited range to choose from. The two models that seems to meet my
> needs and that i've retained on my wishlist yet are the DX6490 from
> Kodak and the coolpix 5700 from Nikon. Ok now to go to the point,
> there's four questions yet that i need to clarify. First, about the
> ISO rating. If i understand correctly what i've read on the subject
> yet, if i have a camera that can shoot at an higher ISO equivalent,
> the shutter speed then don't have to be slower, so photos i take in
> darker areas (like at dusk outside,for example) have a better chance
> of success even if i dont use a tripod and my hands moves a little
> during capture...isn't it? If i'm perfectly stand still...can i make
> also a very good picture in a darker place just by using slower
> shutter speed rather than a high ISO setting? I've read that there's
> an increase in noise in the image on almost all cameras when an
> higher ISO like 800 or even 400 is used. Unfortunately on the Kodak
> web site, the sample photos from the DX6490 where shot with ISO
> settings between 80 and 200 ISO (as seen in the metadata from the
> samples) so of course all the photos looks very good...they want to
> show the best of their products...not the worse! :-) Anyone can point
> me somewhere with a URL toward some high-ISO samples from those
> models. I want to see how bad is the noise at that level.
>
> Second question, what is considered "good" speaking of the click to
> capture delay? In 2003, a friend bought the Pentax Optio 430RS and
> there was a huge delay (1½~2seconds) from the time the button is
> depressed and that the image capture occurs. I dont speak about the
> time that the sample appears on the LCD screen (wich is longer!) but
> really speak about the time from when the button is depressed and
> when the photoflash is triggered. Even in a full daylight scene
> without the flash, the delay seems to be the same. Kodak states that
> the click to capture delay is .65 seconds for the DX6490. Is this
> considered "good" or "standard" for most consumer digicams?
>
>
> Third question is more simple to ask (although maybe not easy to
> answer!). What are the effects of using the camera in the cold
> outside? In mean cold like 5°F (-15°C). Most are equipped with LCD
> screen that bears the description of "Low-temp. polysilicon TFT
> LCD"...but this doesn't tell what is the operating temperature range
> of the whole camera, a thing Kodak and Nikon doesn't specify for this
> model.
>
> Last question is about power. The DC input jack that the DX6490 is
> having on it's side (like many other cameras)...what it's used for
> exactly? It is to power the digicam, to recharge the battery or both?
> I ask because if in a few years from now the battery may becomes rare
> to find like it's the case for many "old" electronic equipment. I
> woul like then to power the camera from an external battery/voltage
> regulator assembly. I did that for a friend for it's camcorder. The
> original Ni-Cad battery pack was rare and very expensive to replace,
> so i designed a system for him consisting of and external inexpensive
> 6 Volts sealed lead-acid battery attached to a belt clip, and a
> charger for the battery. He now have 4 times the amp/hour capacity he
> had before with the original battery pack. If an "old" digicam can be
> powered by an external AC/DC adapter plugged to the DC input jack,
> then the same design could be used.
>
>
> No more questions for now. Still there!! Thanks a lot in advance for
> any useful replies.

See this review of Canon S1 IS - at the bottom you'll se a night shots with
all ISO settings. Normally higher than 200 is not usable. Generally, instead
of increasing ISO, rather slow down shutter speed. However, for this it's
better to use a stand. (or above mentioned canon has digital image
stabilizer - works superb!! I can shoot from hand at 10x optical zoom and
even at combined optical-digital=32x zoom). In cold weather - all i can say
is don't use a camera with Lithium batteries, since they die at -5 degrees
C. You can restore their power by putting them into pocket for a while,
though.
DC input is just what it says - if you buy extra power adapter, you can
shoot without batteries, just with it. However, you're attached to a cord...
And don't use NiCd - use NiMH batteries. Way higher capacity (AA size up to
2300 mAh). Of course, external lead-acid has more capacity, but is also
heavy and clumzy for carrying around, except if you're shooting at one
place. Normally it's best to have two packs of batteries - one you charge,
other you use - fast chargers (1 hour) and car chargers are widely
available.
Oh, the link:

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_s1-re...
!