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Intel Sues Over "Intel" Trademark Infringement

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  • Intel
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October 14, 2011 2:25:22 AM

Thats pretty sad....
FIRST! :D 
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-27
October 14, 2011 2:27:11 AM

AT first, I though Intel was suing Intel.
Didn't doubt it for a second though, considering how much suing's been going on.
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October 14, 2011 2:29:54 AM

even if it doesn't make sense, Intel has to defend their name. There are many examples of trademarks becoming meaningless because the companies fail to keep the meaning restricted to their product or brand. Xerox became a common name for copies, and Rollerblades became a common name for in-line skates. Not saying it will happen to Intel, but it shows why Intel is going to be aggressive about trademark infringement.
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October 14, 2011 2:31:32 AM

Quote:
Only lawyers may be able to understand how Intelspec could have capitalized in its business by using "Intel" as part of its name.


I disagree with you there. I see Intel in a company name and think of computers instantly, but maybe I'm just a geek. Brand recognition is extremely important for companies like Intel, and especially with something as pronounced as "Pentium."

And this doesn't sound like reporting to me, this story is riddled with your opinions. Leave the opinions to the comments section, we users have them in excess.
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October 14, 2011 2:43:38 AM

at least they sue for something that makes sense... unlike apple who just sues everybody for no stupid reason.
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Anonymous
October 14, 2011 2:50:42 AM

Near as I can tell, Intel isn't defensible in any substantial fashion. They would need to have it be IntelMicro or something similar to be defensible. (like what they did with Pentium when they found out that 586 was too generic) Intel is a very common usage word, particularly around the defense industry where IntelSpec has contracts. IntelSpec makes perfect sense there.

In short, I think this suit could actually go quite poorly for Intel, and cause a name change.
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9
October 14, 2011 2:53:35 AM

burnley14I disagree with you there. I see Intel in a company name and think of computers instantly, but maybe I'm just a geek. Brand recognition is extremely important for companies like Intel, and especially with something as pronounced as "Pentium."And this doesn't sound like reporting to me, this story is riddled with your opinions. Leave the opinions to the comments section, we users have them in excess.


That might be true, but also think of how many people are going to look for Intel and find Intelspec, LLC to buy processors. Their business is way off Intel's business, have you been to their website? have you looked in the search engines like Bing or Google? put intel and you'll find page after page about intel processors and everything intel, put intelspec and you'll find Intelspec in the first page, then the lawsuits and then a bunch of websites with Intel specs (specifications) of computers running Intel processors.
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October 14, 2011 3:07:56 AM

I hope I don't get sued

Mike intel
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9
October 14, 2011 3:24:05 AM

They can say "Intel" is short for intelligent, just add the extra L and I problem solve. Oh wait, Microsoft has a mouse call Intellimouse
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October 14, 2011 3:38:17 AM

basically, I can't say that someone is "intel"ligent because Intel(tm)(r) would sue me.
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October 14, 2011 4:01:02 AM

I think you'll find there is a good reason: trademarks get invalidated if they aren't defended.
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October 14, 2011 4:46:28 AM

I would've thought that Intelspec had something to do with Intel as well, and I'm not a complete idiot either.
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October 14, 2011 5:25:52 AM

Quote:
Intelspec is a construction and engineering firm that is, for example, taking contracts for waste management facilities, mining, oilfield infrastructure, as well as military and government construction.


I understand Intel is obligated to defend their trademark. However, in the case of Intelspec, you're not looking for a branded type of service they provide. If I'm looking for a company to provide oilfield infrastructure, I'm not looking for "intel" anything, I'm looking for 'oilfield infrastructure'. Intelspec doesn't produce or provide a service that has 'intel' as any part of the name or description of the service.

I'll never go looking for an "intel" processor and decide to spend the money on "intelspec" to dig a well for me instead.

I have two family members who worked as paralegals and that's pretty much the extent of my knowledge in this area, so I'm making this up as I go.
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October 14, 2011 5:56:18 AM

Gonna go do some retro gaming on my Intellivision.

But to be honest, if I were Paul Otellini, I would probably do the same thing. Intelspec would probably have a better case if they were Intellspec or In-Tell Spec. They will get some good publicity though.
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October 14, 2011 5:58:06 AM

This is silly. Microsoft doesn't go around suing people that have "Windows" in their name, just because they hold a trademark on Windows. There's a reason for it; window is a noun and a word describing something all on its own. The same thing goes for intel. Granted, it's an abbreviation, but it's still a word. I have a feeling this lawsuit won't go too far.
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2
October 14, 2011 6:14:39 AM

nordleadeven if it doesn't make sense, Intel has to defend their name. There are many examples of trademarks becoming meaningless because the companies fail to keep the meaning restricted to their product or brand. Xerox became a common name for copies, and Rollerblades became a common name for in-line skates. Not saying it will happen to Intel, but it shows why Intel is going to be aggressive about trademark infringement.


intel is short for intelligence, so i cant real see a trade mark on that, unless its blatantly trying to deceive.
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October 14, 2011 6:20:28 AM

You have to look at it from all intelligence levels. There are some out there that hear Intel anything and associate it with Intel. Its just name recognition, which is what they wanted.

Using Intel in the name could lead some to think that Intel is the parent company and if there is a problem, might try to call Intel to complain. Its is very possible that someone accociating the 2 companies might think that Intel is branching into other industries and then have certain expectations.

Using Intelli- is different because it asscociates with "intelligent" in your mind.
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October 14, 2011 7:04:12 AM

I see this lawsuit going nowhere. They are not in the same industry (industrial engineering vs. wafer process).

I'm no lawyer, although I did take a class on the legal aspects of engineering (worthless, perhaps?). There needs to be some kind of damage; something has to be overtly infringed, and the name has to cause some kind if ambiguation between the two companies, diverting customers and money, justifying the lawsuit.

I'm not seeing it here.
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October 14, 2011 7:08:11 AM

Martell77You have to look at it from all intelligence levels. There are some out there that hear Intel anything and associate it with Intel. Its just name recognition, which is what they wanted.Using Intel in the name could lead some to think that Intel is the parent company and if there is a problem, might try to call Intel to complain. Its is very possible that someone accociating the 2 companies might think that Intel is branching into other industries and then have certain expectations.Using Intelli- is different because it asscociates with "intelligent" in your mind.



How about military "intel"? The chip manufacturer did not invent the term. Whether or not the military reference (facts about a subject) came first, Intel Corp is not the originator.
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October 14, 2011 7:58:13 AM

So, Intel is worried that someone may mistakenly go to Instelspec and buys a Bulldozer to construct a site instead of using a Sandy Bridge.
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October 14, 2011 8:17:31 AM

godnodogSo, Intel is worried that someone may mistakenly go to Instelspec and buys a Bulldozer to construct a site instead of using a Sandy Bridge.


I see what you did there. Good one.
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October 14, 2011 8:32:53 AM

only an idiot would mistake intelspec website as anything related to intel. it's very clear they are on different industries.
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October 14, 2011 8:41:44 AM

pa
the
tic
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October 14, 2011 9:11:29 AM

spectrewindHow about military "intel"? The chip manufacturer did not invent the term. Whether or not the military reference (facts about a subject) came first, Intel Corp is not the originator.

QFT.
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October 14, 2011 10:02:48 AM

Intel will be sued by FBI for using the word 'intel', which was a word created by fbi meaning the gathering of knowledge!
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October 14, 2011 10:10:56 AM

I hope Intelspec gets damages significant enough to put some fear in Intel to not enter any more frivolous lawsuits.

I like Intel, but the world is too big and there are too many people and too many companies to intimidate companies that aren't trying to make any association with them.

Intel doesn't own those five letters. "Intelligram" sounds like a good name for a communications company and it would be equally ludicrous for Intel to sue someone with that name.
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October 14, 2011 10:14:14 AM

how about apol?
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October 14, 2011 10:17:46 AM

Intel is wrong.

There you have it; the authoritative answer.
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October 14, 2011 10:19:47 AM

Really ridiculous. Hell's Alaska could sue Alabama and then you could all sue Barack Obama since it sounds like Barrack. Apple can sue any applications maker.....his is the height of wasting time and judicial time.
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October 14, 2011 10:44:21 AM

alidanintel is short for intelligence, so i cant real see a trade mark on that, unless its blatantly trying to deceive.

Apple is a trademark and that is a fruit. They also trademarked the words Inkwell, Garage Band, New York and more. Not saying Intel will win this one, since Intel isn't exactly unique like you pointed out. However, you can trademark almost anything, but then you have to defend it like crazy, which is exactly what Intel is doing. They HAVE to defend it even if they know they will lose. Failing to do so can have an affect on them later if decisions are being made by the courts to remove the trademark or not.
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October 14, 2011 11:40:49 AM

now we cannot use the word intelligence because it contains the word intel on it???
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October 14, 2011 12:23:52 PM

They forced a small IT retailer in my town to change their name from "Intelis" to something else "Intend" a few years ago.

Also, another company called Intelprof is currently in trial with intel.
They do IT related training.
intel comes from integrated electronics, whereas Intelprof comes from intelligence and professionalism.
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October 14, 2011 1:49:31 PM

hmm Intel.com and intelspec.com don't really see the correlation here. Not to mention intelspec doesn't even work with electronics it's a construction company lol.
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October 14, 2011 2:11:30 PM

Not strange in any sense to me, Intel has got to defend its name.
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October 14, 2011 2:53:44 PM

Intel became infamous years back for going on a lawsuit spree against any entity with the the series of letters "intel" in their name. It really made them seem pathetic then, and it's doing the same now.
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October 14, 2011 3:57:55 PM

This is getting ridiculous. To what extent will this continue? Maybe I'll make a company called "A", and sue every company with an "A" in their name. (in other words, how many letters do you need to make these false claims?)
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October 14, 2011 4:34:50 PM

AnomalyxThis is getting ridiculous. To what extent will this continue? Maybe I'll make a company called "A", and sue every company with an "A" in their name. (in other words, how many letters do you need to make these false claims?)


You would be sued by the technology company, ADATA, and A-Data, one of the leading distributors of CCTV products in the UK and Europe.
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October 14, 2011 5:00:06 PM

this one will get thrown out easy. do you know how many johnson or smith corporations there are in the united states alone? i know tri state inc. turns up a good 2 dozen in just one state alone.
intelSPEC vs. intel.
if intel wins this i think the united states military and Central Intelligence Agency should sue intel for destroying and sullying their good name and patented core industry.
all rights, proceeeds and property should thusly be broken up and divied up between all the branches and agency.
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October 14, 2011 6:58:05 PM

They aren't in the same field, therefor not a trademark infringement.
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October 14, 2011 8:35:37 PM

Doesn't matter if they're in the same industry or not, they're gonna sue like crazy to protect their trademark, just the way it works. That trademark is probably more important to them than most of yall think...

In fact for another example, look at Ford. Ford goes absolutely apes**t protecting their trademarks. So far as they'll shut down people selling custom covers for your blue oval if it even hints at containing the Ford name. But beyond that they're doing great, and don't really follow the same sue-happy patent/trademark trend as the tech industry.
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October 14, 2011 9:25:22 PM

Considering how much Apple Records (the Beatles) was able to pester Apple Computers. I would not be surprised if Intel will have a case. This goes back to the days of the Apple II when Apple had nothing at all to do with music and resurfaced every couple of years.
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October 15, 2011 12:51:40 AM

LMAO as if someone will mix up the biggest PC CPU manufacturer with obscure construction company. Stupidity.
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October 15, 2011 4:02:11 AM

INTEL = SUCK
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October 15, 2011 1:16:41 PM

I'm siding with Intel on this one. If Intelspec didn't have _spec in their name, I'd go the other way. It's easy to read intelspec.com and think it's a page for intel's spec sheets.
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Anonymous
October 17, 2011 12:57:24 AM

Just dumb, no other word for it... but this is something Intel does all the time. They've filed over 100 complaints with the Patent and Trademark Office. They went after a music firm for using "the music's inside". Anyone using the letters i-n-t-e-l is a target, even if they are clearly meant to imply "intelligence" or "useful information", definitions of "intel" that are in the public domain by any logic.

Of course this is about muscle, not logic. If you're big you can be a bully, and generally the law doesn't protect the weak. If it did, every one of these companies would be coming back at Intel, and winning.
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Anonymous
October 17, 2011 8:24:03 PM

this is just crazy!! how can intel own the word intel!!!

they are going to end up paying Intelspec millions in counter damages, what do these mega corporations think they are. I think I have some intel - so do they want to sue me?
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October 18, 2011 4:24:49 AM

From now on, every time you say "Intelligence" or something along those lines you'll have to pay Intel.
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!