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AntiSpyware alone sufficient

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May 10, 2005 10:55:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware Beta
1,

AVG7.0.308 and

LavaSoft Adaware 6.



Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?

Thanks in advance, Gerhard

More about : antispyware sufficient

Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 10, 2005 11:14:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

In my experience, no one anti-spyware product gets everything. Run AdAware and it will find things, run SpyBot Search and Destroy and it will find things, run MS Anti-spyware and it will still find things.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Gerhard" <gfheiche@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:u2eavNbVFHA.548@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware Beta
> 1,
>
> AVG7.0.308 and
>
> LavaSoft Adaware 6.
>
>
>
> Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
>
> Thanks in advance, Gerhard
>
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 11, 2005 1:58:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

You may wish to upgrade your Ad-Aware 6 software - I believe no spyware
definition updates have been released for several months now for that
version. Try the new Ad-Aware SE Personal v1.05

--

Star Fleet Admiral Q @ your Service!

http://www.google.com
Google is your "Friend"

"Gerhard" <gfheiche@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:u2eavNbVFHA.548@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware
> Beta 1,
>
> AVG7.0.308 and
>
> LavaSoft Adaware 6.
>
>
>
> Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
>
> Thanks in advance, Gerhard
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 11, 2005 2:07:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

From: "Gerhard" <gfheiche@hotmail.com>

| On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware Beta
| 1,
|
| AVG7.0.308 and
|
| LavaSoft Adaware 6.
|
| Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
|
| Thanks in advance, Gerhard
|

You need to replace Ad-aware6 with Ad-aware SE v1.05. Ad-aware6 is no longer supported nor
updated !

I also suggest you download and use SpyBot Search and Destroy v1.3

The combination of AVg 7.x, Ad-aware and SpyBot S&D should keep you good. However, if you
don't practice Safe Hex, all the software in the world won't help you.

As for MS Anti Spyware. It is a Beta software and I haven't and don't suggest it until it
comes out of Beta status.
In addition, MS Anti Spyware is NOT a substitute for anti virus software.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 11, 2005 7:48:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

I wa s told that you can do a check on your broadband speed and whether you
had spyware running by going to the RUN facility. how is this done please.
the spyware remover is not very helpful

"Shenan Stanley" wrote:

> Gerhard wrote:
> > On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware
> > Beta 1,
> > AVG7.0.308 and
> > LavaSoft Adaware 6.
> >
> > Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
>
> Read through my tips.. then decide on your own how protected you are..
>
> Microsoft has these suggestions for Protecting your computer from the
> various "bad things" that could happen to you/it:
>
> Protect your PC
> http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/
>
>
> Although those tips are fantastic, there are many things you should
> know above and beyond what is there as well as other methods and
> applications you can use to protect yourself. Below I have detailed
> out many steps that can not only help you cleanup a problem PC but
> keep it clean and secure as well as running at its top performance mark.
>
> I know this list can seem intimidating - it is quite long and a lot
> to take in for a novice - but I assure you that one trip through this
> list and you will understand your computer and the options available
> to you for protecting your data much better and that the next time
> you review these steps, the time it takes will be greatly reduced.
>
> Let's take the cleanup of your computer step-by-step. Yes, it will take
> up some of your time - but consider what you use your computer
> for and how much you would dislike it if all of your stuff on your
> computer went away because you did not "feel like" performing some
> simple maintenance tasks - think of it like changing the oil in your car,
> changing the air filter on your home A/C unit, paying your bills on time,
> etc.
>
> Let's go through some maintenance first that should only have to be done
> once (mostly):
>
> Tip (1):
> Locate all of the software (the installation media - CDs, etc) that you
> have installed on your computer. Collect these CDs into a single pile
> and locate the original installation media (CDs, disks) in a central and
> safe place along with their CD keys and such. Make backups of these
> installation media sets using your favorite copying method (CD Burner and
> application, Disk copier, etc.) You'll be glad to know that if you have
> a CD burner, you may be able to use a free application to make a
> duplicate copy of your CDs. One such application is ISORecorder:
>
> ISORecorder home page (with general instructions on use):
> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm
>
> Pre-SP2 version:
> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/IsoRecorder/download...
>
> Post-SP2 beta version:
> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/download/ISORecorder...
>
> More full function applications (free) for CD/DVD burning would be:
>
> DeepBurner Free
> http://www.deepburner.com/
>
> CDBurnerXP Pro
> http://www.cdburnerxp.se/
>
> Another Option would be to search the web with Pricewatch.com or
> Dealsites.net and find deals on Nero and/or Roxio.
>
>
> Tip (2):
> Empty your Internet Explorer Temporary Internet Files and make sure the
> maximum size for this is small enough not to cause trouble in the future.
> Empty your Temporary Internet Files and shrink the size it stores to a
> size between 128MB and 512MB..
>
> - Open ONE copy of Internet Explorer.
> - Select TOOLS -> Internet Options.
> - Under the General tab in the "Temporary Internet Files" section, do the
> following:
> - Click on "Delete Cookies" (click OK)
> - Click on "Settings" and change the "Amount of disk space to use:" to
> something between 128MB and 512MB. (Betting it is MUCH larger right
> now.)
> - Click OK.
> - Click on "Delete Files" and select to "Delete all offline contents"
> (the checkbox) and click OK. (If you had a LOT, this could take 2-10
> minutes or more.)
> - Once it is done, click OK, close Internet Explorer, re-open Internet
> Explorer.
>
>
> Tip (3):
> If things are running a bit slow or you have an older system
> (1.5GHz or less and 256MB RAM or less) then you may want to look into
> tweaking the performance a bit by turning off some of the memory
> using Windows XP "prettifications". The fastest method is:
>
> Control Panel --> System --> Advanced tab --> Performance section,
> Settings button. Then choose "adjust for best performance" and you
> now have a Windows 2000/98 look which turned off many of the annoying
> "prettifications" in one swift action. You can play with the last
> three checkboxes to get more of an XP look without many of the
> other annoyances. You could also grab and install/mess with one
> (or more) of the Microsoft Powertoys - TweakUI in particular:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
>
>
> Tip (4):
> Understanding what a good password might be is vital to your
> personal and system security. You may not need to password your home
> computer, as you may have it in a locked area (your home) where no
> one else has access to it. Remember, however, that locked area is
> unlocked when you access the Internet unless you are taking proper
> precautions. Also, you aren't always "in that locked area" when using
> your computer online - meaning you likely have usernames and passwords
> associated with web sites and the likes that you would prefer other
> people do not discover/use. This is why you should understand and
> utilize good passwords.
>
> Good passwords are those that meet these general rules
> (mileage may vary):
>
> Passwords should contain at least six characters, and the character
> string should contain at least three of these four character types:
> - uppercase letters
> - lowercase letters
> - numerals
> - nonalphanumeric characters (e.g., *, %, &, !)
>
> Passwords should not contain your name/logon name. Passwords should
> be unique to you and easy to remember. One method many people are
> using today is to make up a phrase that describes a point in their
> life and then turning that phrase into their password by using only
> certain letters out of each word in that phrase. It's much better
> than using your birthday month/year or your anniversary in a pure
> sense. For example, let's say my phrase is:
> "Moved to new home in 2004"
> I could come up with this password from that:
> "Mv2n3whmN04"
>
> The password tip is in the "one time" section, but I highly
> recommend you periodically change your passwords. The suggested time
> varies, but I will throw out a "once in every 3 to 6 months for
> every account you have."
>
>
> Tip (5):
> This tip is also "questionable" in the "one time" section. However,
> if properly setup, this one can be pretty well ignored for most people
> after the initial "fiddle-with" time.
>
> Why you should use a computer firewall..
> http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/viruses/fwbene...
>
> You should, in some way, use a firewall. Hardware (like a nice
> Cable Modem/DSL router) or software is up to you. Many use both of
> these. The simplest one to use is the hardware one, as most people
> don't do anything they need to configure their NAT device for and
> those who do certainly will not mind fiddling with the equipment to
> make things work for them. Next in the line of "simplicity" would
> have to be the built-in Windows Firewall of Windows XP. In SP2 it
> is turned on by default. It is not difficult to turn on in any
> case, however:
>
> Enable/Disable the Internet Connection Firewall (Pre-SP2):
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283673
>
> More information on the Internet Connection Firewall (Pre-SP2):
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320855
>
> Post-SP2 Windows Firewall Information/guidance:
> http://snipurl.com/atal
>
> The trouble with the Windows Firewall is that it only keeps things
> out. Truthfully, for most people who maintain their system in other
> ways, this is MORE than sufficient. However, you may feel otherwise.
> If you want to know when one of your applications is trying to obtain
> access to the outside world so you can stop it, then you will have to
> install a third-party application and configure/maintain it. I have
> compiled a list with links of some of the better known/free firewalls
> you can choose from:
>
> ZoneAlarm (Free and up)
> http://snipurl.com/6ohg
>
> Kerio Personal Firewall (KPF) (Free and up)
> http://www.kerio.com/kpf_download.html
>
> Outpost Firewall from Agnitum (Free and up)
> http://www.agnitum.com/download/
>
> Sygate Personal Firewall (Free and up)
> http://smb.sygate.com/buy/download_buy.htm
>
> Symantec's Norton Personal Firewall (~$25 and up)
> http://www.symantec.com/sabu/nis/npf/
>
> BlackICE PC Protection ($39.95 and up)
> http://blackice.iss.net/
>
> Perhaps you can find the right firewall for your situation in that
> list and set it up/configure it. Every firewall MAY require some
> maintenance. Essentially checking for patches or upgrades (this
> goes for hardware and software solutions) is the extent of this
> maintenance - but you may also have to configure your firewall to
> allow some traffic depending on your needs. Also, don't stack these
> things. Running more than one firewall will not make you safer
> - it would likely (in fact) negate some protection you gleamed
> from one or the other firewalls you run.
>
>
>
> Now that you have some of the more basic (one-time) things down..
> Let's go through some of the steps you should take periodically to
> maintain a healthy and stable windows computer. If you have not
> done some of these things in the past, they may seem tedious at
> first - however, they will become routine and some can even be
> automatically scheduled.
>
>
> Tip (6):
> The system restore feature is a new one - first appearing in Windows
> ME and then sticking around for Windows XP. It is a VERY useful
> feature - if you keep it maintained and use it to your advantage.
> However, remember that the system restore pretty much tells you in
> the name what it protects - "system" files. Your documents, your
> pictures, your stuff is NOT system files - so you should also look
> into some backup solution.
>
> I'll mainly work around Windows XP, as that is what the bulk of this
> document is about. I will, however, point out a single place for you
> poor souls still stuck in Windows ME where you can get information on
> maintaining your system right now:
>
> Windows ME Computer Health:
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsME/using/computerhealth...
>
> Pay close attention to the sections:
> (in order)
> - Clean up your hard disk
> - Check for errors by running ScanDisk
> - Defragment your hard disk
> - Roll back the clock with System Restore
>
> Now back to the point at hand - maintaining your system restore in
> Windows XP SHOULD be automatic - but I have seen the automatic go wrong
> too many times not to suggest the following.. Whenever you think about
> it (after doing a once-over on your machine once a month or so would
> be optimal) - clear out your System Restore and create a manual
> restoration point. Why? Too many times have I seen the system restore
> files go corrupt or get a virus in them, meaning you could not or
> did not want to restore from them. By clearing it out periodically
> you help prevent any corruption from happening and you make sure you
> have at least one good "snapshot".
> (This, of course, will erase any previous restore point you have.)
>
> - Turn off System Restore.
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310405
> - Reboot.
> - Turn on System Restore.
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310405
> - Make a Manual Restoration Point.
> http://snipurl.com/68nx
>
> That covers your system files, but doesn't do anything for the files
> that you are REALLY worried about - yours! For that you need to look
> into backups. You can either manually copy your important files, folders,
> documents, spreadsheets, emails, contacts, pictures, drawings and so on
> to an external location (CD/DV - any disk of some sort, etc) or you can
> use the backup tool that comes with Windows XP:
>
> How To Use Backup to Back Up Files and Folders on Your Computer
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308422
>
> Yes - you still need some sort of external media to store the results
> on, but you could schedule the backup to occur when you are not around,
> then burn the resultant data onto CD or DVD or something when you are
> (while you do other things!)
>
>
> Tip (7):
> You should sometimes look through the list of applications that are
> installed on your computer. The list MIGHT surprise you. There are more
> than likely things in there you KNOW you never use - so why have them
> there? There may even be things you KNOW you did not install and
> certainly do not use (maybe don't WANT to use.)
>
> This web site should help you get started at looking through this list:
>
> How to Uninstall Programs
> http://snipurl.com/8v6b
>
> A word of warning - Do NOT uninstall anything you think you MIGHT need
> in the future unless you have completed Tip (1) and have the installation
> media and proper keys for use backed up somewhere safe!
>
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 11, 2005 1:47:39 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

"robsnell" <robsnell@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:846724E0-3C62-4350-95D0-C860D0AD6B20@microsoft.com...
>I wa s told that you can do a check on your broadband speed and whether you
> had spyware running by going to the RUN facility. how is this done please.
> the spyware remover is not very helpful
>

Although slower than normal internet speed can be a sign of spyware
infection it is not a reliable method of checking for spyware. Many things
other than spyware can affect internet speed. Most of them are beyond your
control and change day to day. Your ISP's servers, routers between you and
the site you are accessing, the speed and current load of the site you are
accessing are just a few. Online speed tests are a test of the internet in
general, your ISP, then your computer in that order. It is important to run
at least a couple of different spyware scans on a regular basis. Personally
I use MS Antispyware, Ad-Aware and Spybot Search and Destroy. Even then I
have found the odd bit of spyware that gets by all of them and must be
removed manually. Usually this can be found by monitoring known spyware
locations in the registry and checking what services are running. Note: this
takes a lot of computer knowledge. I don't recommaned manual checking unless
you are an advanced user. Pick a couple of antispyware prorgams, update and
use them at east once a week.

Kerry


> "Shenan Stanley" wrote:
>
>> Gerhard wrote:
>> > On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware
>> > Beta 1,
>> > AVG7.0.308 and
>> > LavaSoft Adaware 6.
>> >
>> > Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
>>
>> Read through my tips.. then decide on your own how protected you are..
>>
>> Microsoft has these suggestions for Protecting your computer from the
>> various "bad things" that could happen to you/it:
>>
>> Protect your PC
>> http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/
>>
>>
>> Although those tips are fantastic, there are many things you should
>> know above and beyond what is there as well as other methods and
>> applications you can use to protect yourself. Below I have detailed
>> out many steps that can not only help you cleanup a problem PC but
>> keep it clean and secure as well as running at its top performance mark.
>>
>> I know this list can seem intimidating - it is quite long and a lot
>> to take in for a novice - but I assure you that one trip through this
>> list and you will understand your computer and the options available
>> to you for protecting your data much better and that the next time
>> you review these steps, the time it takes will be greatly reduced.
>>
>> Let's take the cleanup of your computer step-by-step. Yes, it will take
>> up some of your time - but consider what you use your computer
>> for and how much you would dislike it if all of your stuff on your
>> computer went away because you did not "feel like" performing some
>> simple maintenance tasks - think of it like changing the oil in your car,
>> changing the air filter on your home A/C unit, paying your bills on time,
>> etc.
>>
>> Let's go through some maintenance first that should only have to be done
>> once (mostly):
>>
>> Tip (1):
>> Locate all of the software (the installation media - CDs, etc) that you
>> have installed on your computer. Collect these CDs into a single pile
>> and locate the original installation media (CDs, disks) in a central and
>> safe place along with their CD keys and such. Make backups of these
>> installation media sets using your favorite copying method (CD Burner and
>> application, Disk copier, etc.) You'll be glad to know that if you have
>> a CD burner, you may be able to use a free application to make a
>> duplicate copy of your CDs. One such application is ISORecorder:
>>
>> ISORecorder home page (with general instructions on use):
>> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm
>>
>> Pre-SP2 version:
>> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/IsoRecorder/download...
>>
>> Post-SP2 beta version:
>> http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/download/ISORecorder...
>>
>> More full function applications (free) for CD/DVD burning would be:
>>
>> DeepBurner Free
>> http://www.deepburner.com/
>>
>> CDBurnerXP Pro
>> http://www.cdburnerxp.se/
>>
>> Another Option would be to search the web with Pricewatch.com or
>> Dealsites.net and find deals on Nero and/or Roxio.
>>
>>
>> Tip (2):
>> Empty your Internet Explorer Temporary Internet Files and make sure the
>> maximum size for this is small enough not to cause trouble in the future.
>> Empty your Temporary Internet Files and shrink the size it stores to a
>> size between 128MB and 512MB..
>>
>> - Open ONE copy of Internet Explorer.
>> - Select TOOLS -> Internet Options.
>> - Under the General tab in the "Temporary Internet Files" section, do the
>> following:
>> - Click on "Delete Cookies" (click OK)
>> - Click on "Settings" and change the "Amount of disk space to use:" to
>> something between 128MB and 512MB. (Betting it is MUCH larger right
>> now.)
>> - Click OK.
>> - Click on "Delete Files" and select to "Delete all offline contents"
>> (the checkbox) and click OK. (If you had a LOT, this could take 2-10
>> minutes or more.)
>> - Once it is done, click OK, close Internet Explorer, re-open Internet
>> Explorer.
>>
>>
>> Tip (3):
>> If things are running a bit slow or you have an older system
>> (1.5GHz or less and 256MB RAM or less) then you may want to look into
>> tweaking the performance a bit by turning off some of the memory
>> using Windows XP "prettifications". The fastest method is:
>>
>> Control Panel --> System --> Advanced tab --> Performance section,
>> Settings button. Then choose "adjust for best performance" and you
>> now have a Windows 2000/98 look which turned off many of the annoying
>> "prettifications" in one swift action. You can play with the last
>> three checkboxes to get more of an XP look without many of the
>> other annoyances. You could also grab and install/mess with one
>> (or more) of the Microsoft Powertoys - TweakUI in particular:
>>
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
>>
>>
>> Tip (4):
>> Understanding what a good password might be is vital to your
>> personal and system security. You may not need to password your home
>> computer, as you may have it in a locked area (your home) where no
>> one else has access to it. Remember, however, that locked area is
>> unlocked when you access the Internet unless you are taking proper
>> precautions. Also, you aren't always "in that locked area" when using
>> your computer online - meaning you likely have usernames and passwords
>> associated with web sites and the likes that you would prefer other
>> people do not discover/use. This is why you should understand and
>> utilize good passwords.
>>
>> Good passwords are those that meet these general rules
>> (mileage may vary):
>>
>> Passwords should contain at least six characters, and the character
>> string should contain at least three of these four character types:
>> - uppercase letters
>> - lowercase letters
>> - numerals
>> - nonalphanumeric characters (e.g., *, %, &, !)
>>
>> Passwords should not contain your name/logon name. Passwords should
>> be unique to you and easy to remember. One method many people are
>> using today is to make up a phrase that describes a point in their
>> life and then turning that phrase into their password by using only
>> certain letters out of each word in that phrase. It's much better
>> than using your birthday month/year or your anniversary in a pure
>> sense. For example, let's say my phrase is:
>> "Moved to new home in 2004"
>> I could come up with this password from that:
>> "Mv2n3whmN04"
>>
>> The password tip is in the "one time" section, but I highly
>> recommend you periodically change your passwords. The suggested time
>> varies, but I will throw out a "once in every 3 to 6 months for
>> every account you have."
>>
>>
>> Tip (5):
>> This tip is also "questionable" in the "one time" section. However,
>> if properly setup, this one can be pretty well ignored for most people
>> after the initial "fiddle-with" time.
>>
>> Why you should use a computer firewall..
>> http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/viruses/fwbene...
>>
>> You should, in some way, use a firewall. Hardware (like a nice
>> Cable Modem/DSL router) or software is up to you. Many use both of
>> these. The simplest one to use is the hardware one, as most people
>> don't do anything they need to configure their NAT device for and
>> those who do certainly will not mind fiddling with the equipment to
>> make things work for them. Next in the line of "simplicity" would
>> have to be the built-in Windows Firewall of Windows XP. In SP2 it
>> is turned on by default. It is not difficult to turn on in any
>> case, however:
>>
>> Enable/Disable the Internet Connection Firewall (Pre-SP2):
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283673
>>
>> More information on the Internet Connection Firewall (Pre-SP2):
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320855
>>
>> Post-SP2 Windows Firewall Information/guidance:
>> http://snipurl.com/atal
>>
>> The trouble with the Windows Firewall is that it only keeps things
>> out. Truthfully, for most people who maintain their system in other
>> ways, this is MORE than sufficient. However, you may feel otherwise.
>> If you want to know when one of your applications is trying to obtain
>> access to the outside world so you can stop it, then you will have to
>> install a third-party application and configure/maintain it. I have
>> compiled a list with links of some of the better known/free firewalls
>> you can choose from:
>>
>> ZoneAlarm (Free and up)
>> http://snipurl.com/6ohg
>>
>> Kerio Personal Firewall (KPF) (Free and up)
>> http://www.kerio.com/kpf_download.html
>>
>> Outpost Firewall from Agnitum (Free and up)
>> http://www.agnitum.com/download/
>>
>> Sygate Personal Firewall (Free and up)
>> http://smb.sygate.com/buy/download_buy.htm
>>
>> Symantec's Norton Personal Firewall (~$25 and up)
>> http://www.symantec.com/sabu/nis/npf/
>>
>> BlackICE PC Protection ($39.95 and up)
>> http://blackice.iss.net/
>>
>> Perhaps you can find the right firewall for your situation in that
>> list and set it up/configure it. Every firewall MAY require some
>> maintenance. Essentially checking for patches or upgrades (this
>> goes for hardware and software solutions) is the extent of this
>> maintenance - but you may also have to configure your firewall to
>> allow some traffic depending on your needs. Also, don't stack these
>> things. Running more than one firewall will not make you safer
>> - it would likely (in fact) negate some protection you gleamed
>> from one or the other firewalls you run.
>>
>>
>>
>> Now that you have some of the more basic (one-time) things down..
>> Let's go through some of the steps you should take periodically to
>> maintain a healthy and stable windows computer. If you have not
>> done some of these things in the past, they may seem tedious at
>> first - however, they will become routine and some can even be
>> automatically scheduled.
>>
>>
>> Tip (6):
>> The system restore feature is a new one - first appearing in Windows
>> ME and then sticking around for Windows XP. It is a VERY useful
>> feature - if you keep it maintained and use it to your advantage.
>> However, remember that the system restore pretty much tells you in
>> the name what it protects - "system" files. Your documents, your
>> pictures, your stuff is NOT system files - so you should also look
>> into some backup solution.
>>
>> I'll mainly work around Windows XP, as that is what the bulk of this
>> document is about. I will, however, point out a single place for you
>> poor souls still stuck in Windows ME where you can get information on
>> maintaining your system right now:
>>
>> Windows ME Computer Health:
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsME/using/computerhealth...
>>
>> Pay close attention to the sections:
>> (in order)
>> - Clean up your hard disk
>> - Check for errors by running ScanDisk
>> - Defragment your hard disk
>> - Roll back the clock with System Restore
>>
>> Now back to the point at hand - maintaining your system restore in
>> Windows XP SHOULD be automatic - but I have seen the automatic go wrong
>> too many times not to suggest the following.. Whenever you think about
>> it (after doing a once-over on your machine once a month or so would
>> be optimal) - clear out your System Restore and create a manual
>> restoration point. Why? Too many times have I seen the system restore
>> files go corrupt or get a virus in them, meaning you could not or
>> did not want to restore from them. By clearing it out periodically
>> you help prevent any corruption from happening and you make sure you
>> have at least one good "snapshot".
>> (This, of course, will erase any previous restore point you have.)
>>
>> - Turn off System Restore.
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310405
>> - Reboot.
>> - Turn on System Restore.
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310405
>> - Make a Manual Restoration Point.
>> http://snipurl.com/68nx
>>
>> That covers your system files, but doesn't do anything for the files
>> that you are REALLY worried about - yours! For that you need to look
>> into backups. You can either manually copy your important files,
>> folders,
>> documents, spreadsheets, emails, contacts, pictures, drawings and so on
>> to an external location (CD/DV - any disk of some sort, etc) or you can
>> use the backup tool that comes with Windows XP:
>>
>> How To Use Backup to Back Up Files and Folders on Your Computer
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308422
>>
>> Yes - you still need some sort of external media to store the results
>> on, but you could schedule the backup to occur when you are not around,
>> then burn the resultant data onto CD or DVD or something when you are
>> (while you do other things!)
>>
>>
>> Tip (7):
>> You should sometimes look through the list of applications that are
>> installed on your computer. The list MIGHT surprise you. There are more
>> than likely things in there you KNOW you never use - so why have them
>> there? There may even be things you KNOW you did not install and
>> certainly do not use (maybe don't WANT to use.)
>>
>> This web site should help you get started at looking through this list:
>>
>> How to Uninstall Programs
>> http://snipurl.com/8v6b
>>
>> A word of warning - Do NOT uninstall anything you think you MIGHT need
>> in the future unless you have completed Tip (1) and have the installation
>> media and proper keys for use backed up somewhere safe!
>>
>>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
May 11, 2005 3:24:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

robsnell wrote:
> I wa s told that you can do a check on your broadband speed and
> whether you had spyware running by going to the RUN facility. how is
> this done please. the spyware remover is not very helpful

By simply going to "RUN"? You mean Start --> RUN?
That is incorrect.

You must Scan your system for Spyware/Adware/Malware to discover and rid
yourself of it. You could (if you knew everything about spyware, I suppose)
go through your Registry and clean it out of the resistry manually.. Then,
in August, when you are done scanning your registry manually - you could get
back on the Internet and see how you did. heh

As for you broadband speed - perhaps if you knew of an FTP site, you could
discover your actual broadband speed from the command line FTP command and
the transfer (upload/download) of files..

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
July 15, 2005 8:39:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

I also have all these -and Norton av and norton firewall.
Even though the "experts" say more than one firewall may cause problems;
I have not had any problems with this arrangement.
Each AV ,at different times, has found viruses that the others missed!
So, I never feel secure without "any" of them.
On top of that; about once a month, I run the Free Panda scan online.
And once, it found a virus that none of my installed AV's found.
But,I'm no expert,but I've "so far",had good results this way!

"Gerhard" wrote:

> On my computer are installed (besides the XP firewall), MS AntiSpyware Beta
> 1,
>
> AVG7.0.308 and
>
> LavaSoft Adaware 6.
>
>
>
> Do I need all three, or would AntiSpyware do the job alone?
>
> Thanks in advance, Gerhard
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
July 18, 2005 4:59:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 16:39:03 -0700, k-nash

>I also have all these -and Norton av and norton firewall.
>Even though the "experts" say more than one firewall may cause problems;
>I have not had any problems with this arrangement.

I've not had as much experience with firewalls as av, so it's only
general theory that makes me reluctant to use multiple firewalls
simultaneously. I'd like to use both XP's firewall and a 3rd-party
one, for example, seeing as the XP one starts to work earlier in the
boot process, before 3rd-party services are started.

>Each AV ,at different times, has found viruses that the others missed!

Yes, you'd see that, because all av are partial protection only.

>On top of that; about once a month, I run the Free Panda scan online.
>And once, it found a virus that none of my installed AV's found.
>But,I'm no expert,but I've "so far",had good results this way!

Redundany can be counter-productive, if the layers "mesh" poorly; it's
like wearing 10 pairs of pants in the snow, and no shirt.

When something gets past one av - either because it's "not a virus"
and thus outside the scope of the tool, or because it's too new - it's
likely to get past all of them. Think commercial malware and one-off
attackware on the first, and the Day Zero blues on the second.

Once malware is running, it can defend itself - the essence of combat
coding is to run your code before the other guy, like the old Wild
West shootouts. So an online scan for active malware is a pretty
pathetic approach, though it's great to upload a single inactive
suspect file for the site to examine.

Both av and firewalls are designed to patch into a tight system space
that doesn't expect much to be integrated there - much less that there
would be several different players integrated there, kept in proper
order through some API or other. That's why one is unsurprised when
multiple av or firewalls cause problems.

I too believe in multiple av, but not all running at the same time. I
apply these on demand, one after another, from "orbit" (i.e. while the
?infected OS is not running, e.g. from a Bart PE CDR boot).

For defence, I believe in multiple layers that mesh well; patching
against code defects, risk management of poor design, choice of decent
apps, forcing the UI to give me truthful information, not letting the
OS do stupid risky things automatically, building my own "safe hex"
skills... and running an av underfoot as "goalie of last resort".


>-- Risk Management is the clue that asks:
"Why do I keep open buckets of petrol next to all the
ashtrays in the lounge, when I don't even have a car?"
>----------------------- ------ ---- --- -- - - - -
!