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Table Salt Could Allow for 18 Terabyte Hard Drives

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October 18, 2011 1:04:06 PM

Wouldn't storing data over multiple grains enable greater data reliability, if 1 grain is wrong but 4 are right for example.
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October 18, 2011 1:24:40 PM

In 10 years....
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October 18, 2011 1:25:58 PM

I can't wait until 2021 when these drives are available!
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October 18, 2011 1:26:44 PM

Very true, but I don't think it would be less reliable than today's drives. From what I've gained from from this article, one bit of information is stored on several different grains, so if any one of those grains is messed up, then the data is messed up.
Here the data is on one grain (so only 1 point of failure rather than several), so maybe its more reliable? That's my logic anyway...
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Anonymous
October 18, 2011 1:27:13 PM

Will it rust?
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October 18, 2011 1:29:46 PM

ansemx324Very true, but I don't think it would be less reliable than today's drives. From what I've gained from from this article, one bit of information is stored on several different grains, so if any one of those grains is messed up, then the data is messed up.Here the data is on one grain (so only 1 point of failure rather than several), so maybe its more reliable? That's my logic anyway...

In ten years u could have 24GB as well.
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October 18, 2011 1:30:13 PM

In ten years u could have 24TB as well.
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October 18, 2011 1:31:29 PM

dane1234Will it rust?

U need to keep it away from the moose.
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October 18, 2011 1:49:04 PM

nikorrU need to keep it away from the moose.


And you* the keyboard AND mouse*.

@dane1234, I appreciate the joke haha
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October 18, 2011 1:52:59 PM

"In addition to the higher capacity, the IMRE also reveals that the new method can be added to existing lithography processes thanks to a secret ingredient: tablet salt."

I knew iPads were good for something :) 
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October 18, 2011 1:59:08 PM

Another would-be-if-it-could-be-maybe technology that, for the moment, should be taken with a grain of salt.
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October 18, 2011 2:11:28 PM

In Ten years? By that time everyone will probably be using SSD drives, as their prices would have dropped a lot by then and their sizes increased.
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October 18, 2011 2:18:19 PM

this will drive up the prices of salt!
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October 18, 2011 2:24:02 PM

Just think about all the... home movies... you could fit on there... yeah... so many home movies...
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October 18, 2011 2:24:37 PM

Nice, but they need to get HD's more reliable: whether it's SSD or not.

because losing all that data would really sucks.
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October 18, 2011 2:25:36 PM

rottingsheepthis will drive up the prices of salt!

I doubt it. It's such a tiny amount on the grand scheme of things.
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October 18, 2011 2:38:37 PM

Good ol' NaCl :) 
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October 18, 2011 2:46:45 PM

somehow, someway, Apple is going to find a way to sue the pants off these people for patent infringement.
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October 18, 2011 2:48:36 PM

rottingsheepthis will drive up the prices of salt!



Hehehehehe, Nice one dude. LMAO
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October 18, 2011 3:37:04 PM

Salt Lake City is the new Silicon Valley.

As for the grains debate. I don't believe these grains are used in the discrete fashion being debated. I think it is more of an analog threshold type thing for the cluster/grain as a unit.
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October 18, 2011 3:59:29 PM

Apple is going to sue this. Clearly, the salt is a rippoff of the iSalt.
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October 18, 2011 4:56:47 PM

Hmmm.....Interesting article bit I wonder if hard disk drives will still be around 10 years from now.
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October 18, 2011 5:22:07 PM

"What are you doing at Home Depot? I thought you were working on that new PC."

"I am. I need to get a back-up generator. I have 6TB mechanical HDDs and need to rebuild the array."

"Huh?"

"Dude, it's gonna take ages, can't risk the power-loss."

There's no telling what else will be available when 6TB HDDs hit the market. You'll probably want to buy at least 2 so you have something to back up data to. How much does 6TB of cloud storage cost? In addition, with ISP caps, I can only back up 200-250GB per month assuming I don't use the internet for anything else.
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October 18, 2011 5:45:48 PM

wait till you see my digital pepper
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October 18, 2011 5:49:21 PM

noblerabbitwait till you see my digital pepper


lol... and are these things iodized or not?
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Anonymous
October 18, 2011 5:54:50 PM

How many TB's would you like on those fries sir?
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October 18, 2011 5:57:47 PM

If you leave it outside, will it attract deer?
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October 18, 2011 6:49:09 PM

Interesting article. I'd take it as grain of salt.

Amazing that expression pointed them in the right direction. :) 
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October 18, 2011 7:55:49 PM

I wonder what this will do for transfer capacity.
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October 18, 2011 8:08:44 PM

Sure 18Tb drives sound impressive, but by the time it arrives we should be ushering in the next resolution above 4K2K or even holographic video, I wouldn't be surprised if TV episodes are 20Gb each.
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October 18, 2011 9:46:22 PM

thearmI can't wait until 2021 when these drives are available!


Nah, 6 years from now max.
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October 18, 2011 11:02:52 PM

__-_-_-__I just want cheaper SSD's.........

And more reliable, bigger ones...
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October 19, 2011 1:24:55 AM

Salted hard drives will appear when 90+% of consumers use SSDs.
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October 19, 2011 2:58:48 AM

Probably won't take 10 years, because if it did platter-HDDs won't be competitive any longer.
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October 19, 2011 4:58:46 AM

Hmm, better not leave one of these babies laying around. The dog might eat it.

I wonder what would happen if they tried using pepper? I'm kidding.
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October 19, 2011 1:36:55 PM

Will they offer a low salt version of the drive?
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October 19, 2011 4:38:41 PM

I would like to see the transfer rates on those 6TB platters, they have to give modern day SSD's a run for their money.
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Anonymous
October 22, 2011 2:51:45 AM

Well seeing as how they are now gouging prices on existing stocks of the current HDDs due ti Thai flooding. Hmm, they are also gouging Samsung, which isn't made in Thailand. LOL I wonder what NewEgg will gouge out of these in 2016? LOL
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Anonymous
October 23, 2011 7:00:53 AM

This whole theory wouldn't be for super-speed, SSD replacements, it would be for high-density data storage. Yes, SSD's are great in some places, but for enormous amounts of data that isn't accessed very often, there is no point, and they're not going to compete with mechanical HD's as far as price goes for quite some time.

Why don't we argue about Cars vs. Semi's next? It's just not the same thing.
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Anonymous
December 2, 2011 2:07:52 AM

Grains of salt! Pass the salt! I can't believe iSalted you!

On a less energetic note, has anyone found other similar profoundly simple solutions for technology?
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!