Blue Dump Screen

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Hello,
The other day, when i turned on my computer, as soon as it started to log on
(from the welcome screen), it gave me the blue screen where it wants to dump
the memory. I have checked all of my drivers and they seem to be fine. I
can boot up in safe mode just fine, but any other way i try it does not work.
If i leave the room and set it aside, it continues to do this in a cyclic
pattern (whether or not i log on). I have no clue what the problem is, i
have not made any changes to the computer. I tried to repair windows but
that did no good. I am running Windows XP Pro with SP2. SP2 has been on
there for a long time now so that can't be the problem.
Thanks in advance,
Brandon
4 answers Last reply
More about blue dump screen
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

    Brandon wrote:
    > Hello,
    > The other day, when i turned on my computer, as soon as it started to log on
    > (from the welcome screen), it gave me the blue screen where it wants to dump
    > the memory. I have checked all of my drivers and they seem to be fine. I
    > can boot up in safe mode just fine, but any other way i try it does not work.
    > If i leave the room and set it aside, it continues to do this in a cyclic
    > pattern (whether or not i log on). I have no clue what the problem is, i
    > have not made any changes to the computer. I tried to repair windows but
    > that did no good. I am running Windows XP Pro with SP2. SP2 has been on
    > there for a long time now so that can't be the problem.
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Brandon

    Hi, Brandon. This could be caused by either software (bad drivers
    particularly) or hardware failure. There is no way for us to help you
    without knowing the actual Stop Error. Write down the Stop Error and
    research it here:

    http://www.aumha.org/win5/kbestop.htm

    In the meantime, here are some general hardware troubleshooting steps.
    I'd start by testing the RAM (memory).

    1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
    observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
    you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
    and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.

    2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
    have to get the program from a working machine. You will either download
    the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or the .iso to
    make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll need to have
    third-party burning software on the machine where you download the file
    - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job. In either case,
    boot with the media you made. The test will run immediately. Let the
    test run for an extended period of time - unless errors are seen
    immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.

    3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
    you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot with
    the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical errors,
    replace it.

    4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
    you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
    laptop, although of course the power
    supply can be faulty.

    5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
    www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.

    Testing hardware failures often involves swapping out suspected parts
    with known-good parts. If you can't do the testing yourself and/or are
    uncomfortable opening your computer, take the machine to a professional
    computer repair shop (not your local equivalent of BigStoreUSA).

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic"
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

    Hello,
    I looked up the stop error and that points towards the CPU, RAM, or bus
    being the problem. I have tested the ram and that is ok. I would like to
    know how I could test my cpu. I have an Intel Celeron 1.7ghz processor. I
    also have cleaned out the pc from any dust problems and am running the
    computer with the case off, so ventilation is not the problem. I have
    unhooked any un-needed things like the printer and other USB devices. (That
    way the power supply can be partially ruled out). Is there a way i can
    completely rule out the power supply?
    Thank You For All of Your Help,
    Brandon

    "Malke" wrote:

    > Brandon wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > > The other day, when i turned on my computer, as soon as it started to log on
    > > (from the welcome screen), it gave me the blue screen where it wants to dump
    > > the memory. I have checked all of my drivers and they seem to be fine. I
    > > can boot up in safe mode just fine, but any other way i try it does not work.
    > > If i leave the room and set it aside, it continues to do this in a cyclic
    > > pattern (whether or not i log on). I have no clue what the problem is, i
    > > have not made any changes to the computer. I tried to repair windows but
    > > that did no good. I am running Windows XP Pro with SP2. SP2 has been on
    > > there for a long time now so that can't be the problem.
    > > Thanks in advance,
    > > Brandon
    >
    > Hi, Brandon. This could be caused by either software (bad drivers
    > particularly) or hardware failure. There is no way for us to help you
    > without knowing the actual Stop Error. Write down the Stop Error and
    > research it here:
    >
    > http://www.aumha.org/win5/kbestop.htm
    >
    > In the meantime, here are some general hardware troubleshooting steps.
    > I'd start by testing the RAM (memory).
    >
    > 1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
    > observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
    > you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
    > and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.
    >
    > 2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
    > have to get the program from a working machine. You will either download
    > the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or the .iso to
    > make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll need to have
    > third-party burning software on the machine where you download the file
    > - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job. In either case,
    > boot with the media you made. The test will run immediately. Let the
    > test run for an extended period of time - unless errors are seen
    > immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.
    >
    > 3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
    > you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot with
    > the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical errors,
    > replace it.
    >
    > 4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
    > you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
    > laptop, although of course the power
    > supply can be faulty.
    >
    > 5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
    > www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.
    >
    > Testing hardware failures often involves swapping out suspected parts
    > with known-good parts. If you can't do the testing yourself and/or are
    > uncomfortable opening your computer, take the machine to a professional
    > computer repair shop (not your local equivalent of BigStoreUSA).
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic"
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

    Here is the stop error message:
    0x0000007F (0x00000008, 0x80042000, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)

    "Brandon" wrote:

    > Hello,
    > The other day, when i turned on my computer, as soon as it started to log on
    > (from the welcome screen), it gave me the blue screen where it wants to dump
    > the memory. I have checked all of my drivers and they seem to be fine. I
    > can boot up in safe mode just fine, but any other way i try it does not work.
    > If i leave the room and set it aside, it continues to do this in a cyclic
    > pattern (whether or not i log on). I have no clue what the problem is, i
    > have not made any changes to the computer. I tried to repair windows but
    > that did no good. I am running Windows XP Pro with SP2. SP2 has been on
    > there for a long time now so that can't be the problem.
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Brandon
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

    Brandon wrote:
    > Hello,
    > I looked up the stop error and that points towards the CPU, RAM, or bus
    > being the problem. I have tested the ram and that is ok. I would like to
    > know how I could test my cpu. I have an Intel Celeron 1.7ghz processor. I
    > also have cleaned out the pc from any dust problems and am running the
    > computer with the case off, so ventilation is not the problem. I have
    > unhooked any un-needed things like the printer and other USB devices. (That
    > way the power supply can be partially ruled out). Is there a way i can
    > completely rule out the power supply?
    > Thank You For All of Your Help,
    > Brandon

    The difficulty with testing motherboards and processors is that usually
    the only way to do that is by swapping out your components for
    known-working ones. This isn't easy because most people don't have extra
    motherboards and processors sitting around. You'd need to have another
    Celeron 1.7GHz processor available or another compatible motherboard in
    which to drop your current processor. There are some software testing
    programs for motherboards such as PCDoctor DOS, TuffTest and the like. I
    don't always find them definitive though. This is where you think about
    taking the machine to a professional computer repair shop (not your
    local equivalent of BigStoreUSA) because they will have the testing
    programs/facilities.

    There are power supply testers, but the best and easiest way is to swap
    out the psu for a known-working one. Run the machine with it for a while
    and if it behaves, then you know to replace the original one.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic"
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