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Non-Admin User Can Delete Files in Shared Document

Last response: in Windows XP
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July 3, 2005 2:08:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

I am using Windows XP Home SP2 and realised my non-admin users can delete
folders/files I moved to "shared documents" under "my computer". How do I
prevent this? According to the MS support web site, be default, folders/files
moved to "shared documents" have level 3 security, only read access for
non-admin users.

Would appreciate any help and advise.
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
July 3, 2005 9:08:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

"Peter" <Peter@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:7316CBCD-6E95-4E0C-A7AF-E585E8605A05@microsoft.com...
>I am using Windows XP Home SP2 and realised my non-admin users can delete
> folders/files I moved to "shared documents" under "my computer". How do I
> prevent this? According to the MS support web site, be default,
> folders/files
> moved to "shared documents" have level 3 security, only read access for
> non-admin users.
>
> Would appreciate any help and advise.

If you *move* a file, it will keep it's existing security settings. So if
you grab something from one user's own documents folder, and move it to the
shared folder, they will still have access. The easiest way to get around
this is to *copy* the file and delete the original.

Of course, there is absolutely no filesystem security unless your volumes
are formatted with NTFS (as opposed to FAT32.) You can determine what
filesystem the volume uses by right-clicking the drive letter in Explorer/My
Computer and choosing Properties.

If you are using FAT32 and want to convert, see...

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/m...


--
Colin Nash
Microsoft MVP
Windows Shell/User
July 6, 2005 1:08:50 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Peter wrote:

> You obviously not a father yet otherwise you would understand why
> there is a need to restrict the access to read only for a 5 years old
> boy.
>
> Fot the benefit of other readers, I would like to share my expereince.
>
> After reading other threads in this forum I realise I am not alone
> with this challenge and I conclude that you simply can not set the
> files/folders permission in a Widnows XP Home, period. Fortunatley, in
> the same forum I found the workaround. You can set the files/folders
> permission in Windows XP Home Safe mode. I did that last night and it
> works.
>
> BTW, I did not run the System Restore before I did the above otherwise
> I would really have messed up the systems. Thanks and no thanks to
> your "advise"
>
Actually, I'm a mother and I stand behind what I originally said which
you misinterpreted: I can't imagine what files a 5-year old child would
be reading and/or having the opportunity to delete on a shared
computer. A 5-year old child should not be on a computer unsupervised.
In case you didn't understand what I meant, here it is again:

If he's old enough to use the computer, he's old enough to learn
the word, "No". If you let a 5-year old child delete files on a shared
computer, then you deserve what you get.

Malke
--
MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic"
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
July 6, 2005 6:54:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

In article <uDKH$BegFHA.3912@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>,
notreally@invalid.com says...
> Peter wrote:
>
> > You obviously not a father yet otherwise you would understand why
> > there is a need to restrict the access to read only for a 5 years old
> > boy.
> >
> > Fot the benefit of other readers, I would like to share my expereince.
> >
> > After reading other threads in this forum I realise I am not alone
> > with this challenge and I conclude that you simply can not set the
> > files/folders permission in a Widnows XP Home, period. Fortunatley, in
> > the same forum I found the workaround. You can set the files/folders
> > permission in Windows XP Home Safe mode. I did that last night and it
> > works.
> >
> > BTW, I did not run the System Restore before I did the above otherwise
> > I would really have messed up the systems. Thanks and no thanks to
> > your "advise"
> >
> Actually, I'm a mother and I stand behind what I originally said which
> you misinterpreted: I can't imagine what files a 5-year old child would
> be reading and/or having the opportunity to delete on a shared
> computer. A 5-year old child should not be on a computer unsupervised.
> In case you didn't understand what I meant, here it is again:
>
> If he's old enough to use the computer, he's old enough to learn
> the word, "No". If you let a 5-year old child delete files on a shared
> computer, then you deserve what you get.

Many people don't have two computers or know enough to setup permissions
or even use NTFS.

If the person in question had know to use NTFS, create an account for
the adults and one for the kids, then used NTFS security permissions to
protect the shared folders they store their documents in, as long as the
kids were just "users" they would not be able to delete any secured
files/folders.

As a father of three kids that started using computers at age 3, it was
simple for me to setup areas where they could interact with the system
(s) and still secure my data - but being a network admin I already knew
how to secure it. Most home users don't have a clue about NTFS or
security settings.

Rather than preach to them about monitoring kids, which could still lead
to deleted files, how about explaining to them the merits of file/folder
security.

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