PVR software for ATI cards that burns to DVD?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

Is there such a beast? NeroVision Express insists
on transcoding my DVD compliant files, so am
looking elsewhere for an all-in-one package. Any
recommendations? Thanks in advance.
grol
8 answers Last reply
More about software cards burns
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    What version of NeroVision Express. With the latest updates, you'll see a
    check box that allows you to turn on smart endoding, which does not
    re-encode DVD compliant files. Works fine for video captured with my ATI
    Wonder Pro.

    Editing large clips with Nero is another issue entirely, unfortunately -
    huge sync problems. The most recent versions Studio 9 and WinVideo do a
    much better job.

    "grolschie" <grolschie@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:vRg6e.17531$1S4.1764485@news.xtra.co.nz...
    > Is there such a beast? NeroVision Express insists
    > on transcoding my DVD compliant files, so am
    > looking elsewhere for an all-in-one package. Any
    > recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    > grol
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:26:30 +1200, "grolschie" <grolschie@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    >Is there such a beast? NeroVision Express insists
    >on transcoding my DVD compliant files, so am
    >looking elsewhere for an all-in-one package. Any
    >recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    >grol
    >

    I've never liked relying on one source to capture, edit, author and
    burn a DVD. From past experience, I've found at least one element in
    the chain (in the all-in-one programs) is weak and does something I
    neither need or want, doesn't work at all, or corrupts my video
    through additional re-encoding.

    You didn't say what you're trying to do, but it sounds as if you
    simply want to capture DVD compliant videos through your ATI card
    which you then want to burn to DVD. That's what I do and, after
    several months of frustrating trial and error, I've finally gotten it
    down to a rather smooth running. error-free system.

    I use my ATI All-In-Wonder 9600XT to capture cable TV programs. I've
    set the ATI card to capture using the "stock" DVD recording pre-set.
    This produces MPEG-2, 720X480 NTSC, 800 M bit/second. Since I work for
    a cable TV company, I know how to ensure I have the best, quality
    signal pumped into the ATI card, a crucial factor that typically
    produces no dropped frames during the capture process and as clear an
    analog signal as possible.

    After my video is captured, I now want to cut and trim commercial ads
    from the video. What I do NOT want, however, is have this
    DVD-compliant capture I've spent so much time and effort setting up
    re-encoding that video any more than is necessary. For that reason I
    use a very good and inexpensive product called VideoReDo to accomplish
    my editing. VideoReDo only decodes and re-encodes when it has to,
    usually just one or two frames at each cut point.This makes editing
    very fast, but most importantly, there is no further loss in quality.
    (Each time you decode and re-encode an MPEG2 video stream, you lose
    some image quality as a by-product of the decoding/encoding process.)

    After my video has been trimmed in VideoReDo and I now have the video
    I want to burn to a DVD, I now use TMPGEnc DVD Author 1.6 (TDA) to
    prepare menu(s) and chapter points for the video. Again, I use TDA
    because it does NOT re-encode the video.

    Because I typically combine videos that end up being 3-4 hours in
    length, I compile my TDA authored video directly to my hard drive
    where I now use a very good free product (DVD Shrink) to re-compress
    and fit on one standard DVD-5 disc.

    I do have Nero 6 Ultra Edition installed on my system and DVD Shrink
    edoes use Nero's buring ROM to burn my final DVD. But I rarely use
    Nero by itself.

    HTH

    f
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    "edelbeb" <edelbeb@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:425a6aef$0$883$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net...
    > What version of NeroVision Express. With the
    latest updates, you'll see a
    > check box that allows you to turn on smart
    endoding, which does not
    > re-encode DVD compliant files. Works fine for
    video captured with my ATI
    > Wonder Pro.

    Hi. I have the latest NeroVision 3.1.0.0. I use
    PowerDirector 2.55, WinPVR, ATI MMC 8.8.0.0. I
    noticed that some transcode mega-fast with smart
    encoding, and other are fully transcoded slow as.
    What software do you use to record TV with your
    Wonder Pro?

    grol
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    <nospam4me@notaol.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:c2vk515c6u653togpcostvm4jd3g9grkrm@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:26:30 +1200, "grolschie"
    <grolschie@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Is there such a beast? NeroVision Express
    insists
    > >on transcoding my DVD compliant files, so am
    > >looking elsewhere for an all-in-one package.
    Any
    > >recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    > >grol
    > >
    >
    > I've never liked relying on one source to
    capture, edit, author and
    > burn a DVD. From past experience, I've found at
    least one element in
    > the chain (in the all-in-one programs) is weak
    and does something I
    > neither need or want, doesn't work at all, or
    corrupts my video
    > through additional re-encoding.
    >
    > You didn't say what you're trying to do, but it
    sounds as if you
    > simply want to capture DVD compliant videos
    through your ATI card
    > which you then want to burn to DVD. That's what
    I do and, after
    > several months of frustrating trial and error,
    I've finally gotten it
    > down to a rather smooth running. error-free
    system.
    >
    > I use my ATI All-In-Wonder 9600XT to capture
    cable TV programs. I've
    > set the ATI card to capture using the "stock"
    DVD recording pre-set.
    > This produces MPEG-2, 720X480 NTSC, 800 M
    bit/second. Since I work for
    > a cable TV company, I know how to ensure I have
    the best, quality
    > signal pumped into the ATI card, a crucial
    factor that typically
    > produces no dropped frames during the capture
    process and as clear an
    > analog signal as possible.
    >
    > After my video is captured, I now want to cut
    and trim commercial ads
    > from the video. What I do NOT want, however, is
    have this
    > DVD-compliant capture I've spent so much time
    and effort setting up
    > re-encoding that video any more than is
    necessary. For that reason I
    > use a very good and inexpensive product called
    VideoReDo to accomplish
    > my editing. VideoReDo only decodes and
    re-encodes when it has to,
    > usually just one or two frames at each cut
    point.This makes editing
    > very fast, but most importantly, there is no
    further loss in quality.
    > (Each time you decode and re-encode an MPEG2
    video stream, you lose
    > some image quality as a by-product of the
    decoding/encoding process.)
    >
    > After my video has been trimmed in VideoReDo and
    I now have the video
    > I want to burn to a DVD, I now use TMPGEnc DVD
    Author 1.6 (TDA) to
    > prepare menu(s) and chapter points for the
    video. Again, I use TDA
    > because it does NOT re-encode the video.
    >
    > Because I typically combine videos that end up
    being 3-4 hours in
    > length, I compile my TDA authored video directly
    to my hard drive
    > where I now use a very good free product (DVD
    Shrink) to re-compress
    > and fit on one standard DVD-5 disc.
    >
    > I do have Nero 6 Ultra Edition installed on my
    system and DVD Shrink
    > edoes use Nero's buring ROM to burn my final
    DVD. But I rarely use
    > Nero by itself.
    >
    > HTH

    Hi nospam4me,

    Thanks for that info. I will check these programs
    out. An all-in-one should save all this messing
    about though. I guess if I was using Linux, the
    equivalent Linux apps could all be semi-automated
    (invoked with a script). I have used TmpEnc DVD
    Author before. It was so simple, really NeroVision
    Express could learn from it - I am tired of cheesy
    Nero tropical templates etc, and perfer no menus
    if possible sometimes.

    IIRC the output files from MMC are .vcr (one touch
    record) and .mp2 (sheduler) files. Are these both
    mpeg2 files? Or something fishy in them.

    Regards,
    grolschie
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 08:27:44 +1200, "grolschie" <grolschie@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    >
    >Hi nospam4me,
    >
    >Thanks for that info. I will check these programs
    >out. An all-in-one should save all this messing
    >about though. I guess if I was using Linux, the
    >equivalent Linux apps could all be semi-automated
    >(invoked with a script). I have used TmpEnc DVD
    >Author before. It was so simple, really NeroVision
    >Express could learn from it - I am tired of cheesy
    >Nero tropical templates etc, and perfer no menus
    >if possible sometimes.
    >
    >IIRC the output files from MMC are .vcr (one touch
    >record) and .mp2 (sheduler) files. Are these both
    >mpeg2 files? Or something fishy in them.
    >

    You can configure the presets to just about anything you want. Since I
    do no real editing (only trimming) I record in MPEG-2 using the stock
    DVD preset already configured and available. In fact, I find the DVD
    preset better for my purposes than the DVD-High preset.

    Open the TV Set Up window, click on the Personal Video Recorder tab
    and you'll see the Map Presets button midway down on the left. Open
    the Map Presets and you'll see the many varieties of presets
    available. Any of these can be changed, or you can create a new preset
    of your own choosing. Personally, I've never needed anything different
    than the standard DVD preset found there.

    f
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    I'm recording with MMC ATI 9.06.1.

    "grolschie" <grolschie@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:Nau6e.17785$1S4.1777743@news.xtra.co.nz...
    >
    > "edelbeb" <edelbeb@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:425a6aef$0$883$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net...
    >> What version of NeroVision Express. With the
    > latest updates, you'll see a
    >> check box that allows you to turn on smart
    > endoding, which does not
    >> re-encode DVD compliant files. Works fine for
    > video captured with my ATI
    >> Wonder Pro.
    >
    > Hi. I have the latest NeroVision 3.1.0.0. I use
    > PowerDirector 2.55, WinPVR, ATI MMC 8.8.0.0. I
    > noticed that some transcode mega-fast with smart
    > encoding, and other are fully transcoded slow as.
    > What software do you use to record TV with your
    > Wonder Pro?
    >
    > grol
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    I'd like some advice on this issue as I'd prefer the best recording
    possible.

    - Prometheus Xex

    <nospam4me@notaol.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:c2vk515c6u653togpcostvm4jd3g9grkrm@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:26:30 +1200, "grolschie" <grolschie@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >Since I work for
    > a cable TV company, I know how to ensure I have the best, quality
    > signal pumped into the ATI card, a crucial factor that typically
    > produces no dropped frames during the capture process and as clear an
    > analog signal as possible....
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.videocards.ati (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 20:57:56 -0400, "Prometheus Xex" <abc@def.com>
    wrote:

    >I'd like some advice on this issue as I'd prefer the best recording
    >possible.
    >
    >- Prometheus Xex

    Sorry, I haven't been to this newsgroup for a few says and only just
    now saw your post.

    I'd be happy to provide any information I can but it might be better
    if you could be a bit more specific as to what you need.

    In general, most of the problems people have with analog video
    recording doesn't involve the quality of the signal at all, but the
    inefficiency of the internal wiring system in one's home. Cable
    companies are usually pretty good at ensuring good signal levels are
    coming to each of the homes they serve. And, they consistently monitor
    such things. The majority of signal problems occur from the ground
    block in (where the cable attaches to the home and inside the home
    itself.)

    Good quality coax cable (RG-6, Quad Shield) should be used with good
    quality F-Connectors, PROPERLY installed. Splitters used (and there is
    always at least one) need to be of good quality, properly shielded and
    used in a configuration that minimizes signal loss. A splitter needs
    to be in the proper frequency range that matches the ranges provided
    by the local cable company.

    Cable TV signal needs to flow through lines that are completely
    sealed. I've always found a good analogy is to think of it as water
    flowing through a hose. Water, or cable signal, cannot be allowed to
    escape -- anywhere. Any opening whatsoever can allow cable signal to
    leak or seep out and away from its intended destination -- the TV or
    TV tuner card. (In the case of cable TV signal, the slightest opening
    can also allow signal from local over-the-air TV signals to seep IN to
    the cable system causing such things as ghosting.)

    Many people who internally wire their own homes to add additional TV
    outlets never seem to grasp the absolute importance of installing good
    quality connectors, properly and TIGHTLY. This is rarely possible
    using store-bought (Radio Shack, Wal-Mart, etc.) connectors and
    crimpers. Not only will the quality be suspect, purchasing the proper
    connectors and tools can be very expensive, especially when one
    considers these items will rarely be used again. For this reason I've
    always believed it best to simply pay the cable company the one-time
    fee to install additional wiring. They'll use the proper equipment
    PROPERLY to get the job done at a cost far cheaper than the average
    layman can were s/he to purchase the same quality tools and equipment.

    Splitters are another source of lost or improperly directed signal
    most people fail to consider with any degree of importance. But it IS
    important. One must understand spllitting a signal SPLITS the signal.
    That is to say, it cuts it in half, or 1/4, or 1/8, or 1/16 depending
    on how may splitters have been installed and where they've been
    installed.

    Splitters can also vary in quality as well as frequency range. Like
    good quality F-connectors, splitters must be shielded so as to keep
    cable TV signal in and not allowed to leak or seep into the
    atmosphere. While spllitters can be purchased just about anywhere, the
    quality of a store-bought splitters can be equally suspect. I'd
    recommend just stopping a Cable TV Tech on the street and asking for
    one. S/He will always have a supply of cable-quality splitters which
    adhere to the proper standards and frequency range. (Of course, you'll
    want to slip the Tech a few dollars for assistance you've been given.)

    One additional area that seems to go unnoticed but can occasionally
    provide a problem is the grounding of the cable system. Many people
    don't even know their cable system is attached (grounded) to the same
    grounding post as is their internal electric system. Sometimes the
    ground connection can become oxidized and produce interference often
    in the form of hum bars - those wide but faint bars you see on your TV
    screen that move somewhat slowly from bottom to top. It's important
    to note that hum bars can also be the result of other poorly-shielded
    appliances operating inside the home -- a refrigerator, a microwave
    oven or even the TV itself. But sometimes it's the degraded quality of
    the ground wire where its attached to the ground block. Cleaning or
    removing the oxidatoin from these connections can sometimes eliminate
    this kind ofTV interference and improve reception or the quality of
    the picture.

    I've just given some general information here, written quite
    impromptu, in the hope it gives you some information to work with. I
    hope you find it helpful.

    f
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