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  • Microsoft
  • Windows XP
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Anonymous
a b 8 Security
August 14, 2005 11:24:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

I use Lavasoft/Adaware daily. My PC recentley crashed and the tech who
repaired it told me this program may have caused it. He advised me to more
careful with my downloads. I got this spyware recommendation from Microsoft:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/exper....
Does anyone agree with his opinion? I've never had a problem using Adaware
before and I thought it was very beneficial to keeping my PC clean.Also, he
printed a dump from my PC which
showed a lot of junk sites I had never accessed (e.g., Kazaa was set to run
on Start up although I never downloaded it and it did not appear in
Add/Remove Programs ). I use Windows XP with the SP2 download. I use AVG as
well as Adaware. No one else uses my PC. I was totally at a loss as to how
any of these bad sites got on my PC. The tech told me it was probably
emails. I never open attachments from anyone unknown to me. He said it
really doesn't
matter. If their computer is infected they can pass it along without their
own knowledge. Is this true and if so, is there ANY WAY to really protect
yourself??? Dazed and confused.

More about : security question

August 14, 2005 11:24:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Lisa wrote:

> I use Lavasoft/Adaware daily. My PC recentley crashed and the tech who
> repaired it told me this program may have caused it. He advised me to
> more careful with my downloads. I got this spyware recommendation from
> Microsoft:
>
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/exper....
> Does anyone agree with his opinion? I've never had a problem using
> Adaware before and I thought it was very beneficial to keeping my PC
> clean.Also, he printed a dump from my PC which showed a lot of junk
> sites I had never accessed (e.g., Kazaa was set to run on Start up
> although I never downloaded it and it did not appear in Add/Remove
> Programs ). I use Windows XP with the SP2 download. I use AVG as well
> as Adaware. No one else uses my PC. I was totally at a loss as to how
> any of these bad sites got on my PC. The tech told me it was probably
> emails. I never open attachments from anyone unknown to me. He said it
> really doesn't matter. If their computer is infected they can pass it
> along without their own knowledge. Is this true and if so, is there
> ANY WAY to really protect yourself??? Dazed and confused.

It is very, very, very unlikely that Ad-aware caused any problems. I
don't think you need to run it every day though. That's overkill. As
for how Kazaa, etc. got into your computer - someone in your household
must have done this. While I've certainly seen some spyware do a
driveby install on a pre-SP2 box, Kazaa has to be downloaded and
installed by someone. There isn't any way for me to know who did this;
you know who lives with you.

This does remind me of a recent incident with one of my clients. I had
just cleaned her machine - XP Home, SP2 - and then a few weeks later
she was calling me again. She had tons of spyware, rogue antispyware
programs, and pr0n links. "How did this happen?" she wailed. She never
went to bad sites, never opened attachments. Well, we looked at the
History for both Firefox and IE and it was just like reading a story.
We could see the exact date and time her 10-year-old son and his little
friend started searching for s@x stuff, what they looked at, what they
downloaded, and where they panicked and downloaded the rogue
antispyware program. So there you go.

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
August 15, 2005 12:07:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Thanks for the response Malke. The tech's warning on Adaware made me doubt
everything I had been told so thanks for reassuring me. As for Kaaza, it
was not downloaded on PC. Only one file was on it. I live alone and NO ONE
uses my PC. The tech's take on this was it was transferred via email. It's
been my understanding that this can only happen IF you open attachments from
people whom you don't know. I never do that. But he said spyware can be
transferred without opening attachments and that's what I was curious about.
If that's true, there's really no way of really protecting against it.
People with whom I correspond could transfer it unknowingly. ????

"Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
news:uKwU4jQoFHA.1444@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Lisa wrote:
>
>> I use Lavasoft/Adaware daily. My PC recentley crashed and the tech who
>> repaired it told me this program may have caused it. He advised me to
>> more careful with my downloads. I got this spyware recommendation from
>> Microsoft:
>>
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/exper....
>> Does anyone agree with his opinion? I've never had a problem using
>> Adaware before and I thought it was very beneficial to keeping my PC
>> clean.Also, he printed a dump from my PC which showed a lot of junk
>> sites I had never accessed (e.g., Kazaa was set to run on Start up
>> although I never downloaded it and it did not appear in Add/Remove
>> Programs ). I use Windows XP with the SP2 download. I use AVG as well
>> as Adaware. No one else uses my PC. I was totally at a loss as to how
>> any of these bad sites got on my PC. The tech told me it was probably
>> emails. I never open attachments from anyone unknown to me. He said it
>> really doesn't matter. If their computer is infected they can pass it
>> along without their own knowledge. Is this true and if so, is there
>> ANY WAY to really protect yourself??? Dazed and confused.
>
> It is very, very, very unlikely that Ad-aware caused any problems. I
> don't think you need to run it every day though. That's overkill. As
> for how Kazaa, etc. got into your computer - someone in your household
> must have done this. While I've certainly seen some spyware do a
> driveby install on a pre-SP2 box, Kazaa has to be downloaded and
> installed by someone. There isn't any way for me to know who did this;
> you know who lives with you.
>
> This does remind me of a recent incident with one of my clients. I had
> just cleaned her machine - XP Home, SP2 - and then a few weeks later
> she was calling me again. She had tons of spyware, rogue antispyware
> programs, and pr0n links. "How did this happen?" she wailed. She never
> went to bad sites, never opened attachments. Well, we looked at the
> History for both Firefox and IE and it was just like reading a story.
> We could see the exact date and time her 10-year-old son and his little
> friend started searching for s@x stuff, what they looked at, what they
> downloaded, and where they panicked and downloaded the rogue
> antispyware program. So there you go.
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
Related resources
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
August 15, 2005 12:07:23 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Not sure on that one in particular, but understand that if someone
you have had "email relations" with gets infected, the junk on their
machine often grabs their address book first and sends itself on to
everyone in it. They don't even know anything was sent -
especially if they are on broadband or DSL and "always on".
Kazza, Gator and the others like that remind me of what I pick up
in the yard after the dogs. I don't know which email client you
use (what do you read your email with). If it is Lookout Express.... er..
I mean Outlook Express, you can sneak up on email that is not
plain text without it running. Right click the message, select
"properties" , click the "details" tab then click the "message source"
button. It will open the message in a TEXT only window so nothing
gets a chance to run. You can see what is in it and if it makes
sense. Just because it is "from someone you know" doesn't mean
it is really "from" them - it could be from their machine that is
infected or from some other source with a forged header.
It's a tough world out there ...

mikey

"Lisa" <NoOne@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:_vNLe.23763$dJ5.7645@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> Thanks for the response Malke. The tech's warning on Adaware made me doubt
> everything I had been told so thanks for reassuring me. As for Kaaza, it
> was not downloaded on PC. Only one file was on it. I live alone and NO ONE
> uses my PC. The tech's take on this was it was transferred via email. It's
> been my understanding that this can only happen IF you open attachments
from
> people whom you don't know. I never do that. But he said spyware can be
> transferred without opening attachments and that's what I was curious
about.
> If that's true, there's really no way of really protecting against it.
> People with whom I correspond could transfer it unknowingly. ????
>
> "Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
> news:uKwU4jQoFHA.1444@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > Lisa wrote:
> >
> >> I use Lavasoft/Adaware daily. My PC recentley crashed and the tech who
> >> repaired it told me this program may have caused it. He advised me to
> >> more careful with my downloads. I got this spyware recommendation from
> >> Microsoft:
> >>
> >
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/exper....
> >> Does anyone agree with his opinion? I've never had a problem using
> >> Adaware before and I thought it was very beneficial to keeping my PC
> >> clean.Also, he printed a dump from my PC which showed a lot of junk
> >> sites I had never accessed (e.g., Kazaa was set to run on Start up
> >> although I never downloaded it and it did not appear in Add/Remove
> >> Programs ). I use Windows XP with the SP2 download. I use AVG as well
> >> as Adaware. No one else uses my PC. I was totally at a loss as to how
> >> any of these bad sites got on my PC. The tech told me it was probably
> >> emails. I never open attachments from anyone unknown to me. He said it
> >> really doesn't matter. If their computer is infected they can pass it
> >> along without their own knowledge. Is this true and if so, is there
> >> ANY WAY to really protect yourself??? Dazed and confused.
> >
> > It is very, very, very unlikely that Ad-aware caused any problems. I
> > don't think you need to run it every day though. That's overkill. As
> > for how Kazaa, etc. got into your computer - someone in your household
> > must have done this. While I've certainly seen some spyware do a
> > driveby install on a pre-SP2 box, Kazaa has to be downloaded and
> > installed by someone. There isn't any way for me to know who did this;
> > you know who lives with you.
> >
> > This does remind me of a recent incident with one of my clients. I had
> > just cleaned her machine - XP Home, SP2 - and then a few weeks later
> > she was calling me again. She had tons of spyware, rogue antispyware
> > programs, and pr0n links. "How did this happen?" she wailed. She never
> > went to bad sites, never opened attachments. Well, we looked at the
> > History for both Firefox and IE and it was just like reading a story.
> > We could see the exact date and time her 10-year-old son and his little
> > friend started searching for s@x stuff, what they looked at, what they
> > downloaded, and where they panicked and downloaded the rogue
> > antispyware program. So there you go.
> >
> > Malke
> > --
> > Elephant Boy Computers
> > www.elephantboycomputers.com
> > "Don't Panic!"
> > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>
>
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
August 15, 2005 3:31:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Mike, I do use Outlook Express. Thanks for tip on checking the source. I
didn't know that. So far, I have not opened anything that was not from
someone I did know but I am aware of address stealing or whatever it's
called. Can't be too careful and IMO can't really have to much protection.

'"Mike Fields" <spam_me_not_mr.gadget2@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:uYv8ZKRoFHA.708@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Not sure on that one in particular, but understand that if someone
> you have had "email relations" with gets infected, the junk on their
> machine often grabs their address book first and sends itself on to
> everyone in it. They don't even know anything was sent -
> especially if they are on broadband or DSL and "always on".
> Kazza, Gator and the others like that remind me of what I pick up
> in the yard after the dogs. I don't know which email client you
> use (what do you read your email with). If it is Lookout Express.... er..
> I mean Outlook Express, you can sneak up on email that is not
> plain text without it running. Right click the message, select
> "properties" , click the "details" tab then click the "message source"
> button. It will open the message in a TEXT only window so nothing
> gets a chance to run. You can see what is in it and if it makes
> sense. Just because it is "from someone you know" doesn't mean
> it is really "from" them - it could be from their machine that is
> infected or from some other source with a forged header.
> It's a tough world out there ...
>
> mikey
>
> "Lisa" <NoOne@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:_vNLe.23763$dJ5.7645@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>> Thanks for the response Malke. The tech's warning on Adaware made me
>> doubt
>> everything I had been told so thanks for reassuring me. As for Kaaza, it
>> was not downloaded on PC. Only one file was on it. I live alone and NO
>> ONE
>> uses my PC. The tech's take on this was it was transferred via email.
>> It's
>> been my understanding that this can only happen IF you open attachments
> from
>> people whom you don't know. I never do that. But he said spyware can be
>> transferred without opening attachments and that's what I was curious
> about.
>> If that's true, there's really no way of really protecting against it.
>> People with whom I correspond could transfer it unknowingly. ????
>>
>> "Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
>> news:uKwU4jQoFHA.1444@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> > Lisa wrote:
>> >
>> >> I use Lavasoft/Adaware daily. My PC recentley crashed and the tech who
>> >> repaired it told me this program may have caused it. He advised me to
>> >> more careful with my downloads. I got this spyware recommendation from
>> >> Microsoft:
>> >>
>> >
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/security/exper....
>> >> Does anyone agree with his opinion? I've never had a problem using
>> >> Adaware before and I thought it was very beneficial to keeping my PC
>> >> clean.Also, he printed a dump from my PC which showed a lot of junk
>> >> sites I had never accessed (e.g., Kazaa was set to run on Start up
>> >> although I never downloaded it and it did not appear in Add/Remove
>> >> Programs ). I use Windows XP with the SP2 download. I use AVG as well
>> >> as Adaware. No one else uses my PC. I was totally at a loss as to how
>> >> any of these bad sites got on my PC. The tech told me it was probably
>> >> emails. I never open attachments from anyone unknown to me. He said it
>> >> really doesn't matter. If their computer is infected they can pass it
>> >> along without their own knowledge. Is this true and if so, is there
>> >> ANY WAY to really protect yourself??? Dazed and confused.
>> >
>> > It is very, very, very unlikely that Ad-aware caused any problems. I
>> > don't think you need to run it every day though. That's overkill. As
>> > for how Kazaa, etc. got into your computer - someone in your household
>> > must have done this. While I've certainly seen some spyware do a
>> > driveby install on a pre-SP2 box, Kazaa has to be downloaded and
>> > installed by someone. There isn't any way for me to know who did this;
>> > you know who lives with you.
>> >
>> > This does remind me of a recent incident with one of my clients. I had
>> > just cleaned her machine - XP Home, SP2 - and then a few weeks later
>> > she was calling me again. She had tons of spyware, rogue antispyware
>> > programs, and pr0n links. "How did this happen?" she wailed. She never
>> > went to bad sites, never opened attachments. Well, we looked at the
>> > History for both Firefox and IE and it was just like reading a story.
>> > We could see the exact date and time her 10-year-old son and his little
>> > friend started searching for s@x stuff, what they looked at, what they
>> > downloaded, and where they panicked and downloaded the rogue
>> > antispyware program. So there you go.
>> >
>> > Malke
>> > --
>> > Elephant Boy Computers
>> > www.elephantboycomputers.com
>> > "Don't Panic!"
>> > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>
>>
>
>
!