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I really screwed up this time!

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2005 9:50:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

At home I was trying to configure the company laptop to work with my old
home desktop PC as part of the same work group. Originally the laptop
was set up to a company domain and the workgroup field under the
Computer Name tab was empty. The laptop uses Win XP professional, my
desktop uses XP Home Edition. I figured that if I switched the laptop
from the domain name assignment to workgroup assignment by toggling the
workgroup radio button instead of the domain name button and writing the
same workgroup name for the laptop, I could accomplish that and later I
could still toggle back the radio button to go back to what it was: a
domain name PC.
Unfortunately, after this change and reboot, the laptop no longer
accepted my old User Name and Password and now I have no idea how to
bring the laptop back and restore it to what it was before I made my
stupid decision. BTW, I do have administrative privileges to this
laptop.

Please, if anybody can help me with this before I go back to work with
the laptop, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks,
Rudy

More about : screwed time

September 18, 2005 10:13:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

R. P. wrote:

> At home I was trying to configure the company laptop to work with my
> old home desktop PC as part of the same work group. Originally the
> laptop was set up to a company domain and the workgroup field under
> the
> Computer Name tab was empty. The laptop uses Win XP professional, my
> desktop uses XP Home Edition. I figured that if I switched the laptop
> from the domain name assignment to workgroup assignment by toggling
> the workgroup radio button instead of the domain name button and
> writing the same workgroup name for the laptop, I could accomplish
> that and later I could still toggle back the radio button to go back
> to what it was: a domain name PC.
> Unfortunately, after this change and reboot, the laptop no longer
> accepted my old User Name and Password and now I have no idea how to
> bring the laptop back and restore it to what it was before I made my
> stupid decision. BTW, I do have administrative privileges to this
> laptop.
>
> Please, if anybody can help me with this before I go back to work with
> the laptop, I would really appreciate it.

I'm very sorry, but you will have to take the laptop to your work's IT
Dept. with your hat in your hand and have them rejoin it to the domain.
There is absolutely no way around this. You messed up and now you must
be brave and humble. Hateful, but really that's the only way.

For the future, here's how to use your domain-enabled laptop on your
home network without destroying the domain settings.

Credit to MVP Lanwench:
Once you've logged in using your domain account (using cached
credentials), and have an IP address on the home network, you can map
drives, use printers, whatnot, very easily - one way, in a command
line:

net use x: \\computername\sharename /user:computername\username <enter>

MS KB article about the Net Use command - http://tinyurl.com/3bpnj

Malke
--
MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic"
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2005 12:35:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

R. P. wrote:
> At home I was trying to configure the company laptop to work with my
> old home desktop PC as part of the same work group. Originally the
> laptop was set up to a company domain and the workgroup field under
> the Computer Name tab was empty. The laptop uses Win XP
> professional, my desktop uses XP Home Edition. I figured that if I
> switched the laptop from the domain name assignment to workgroup
> assignment by toggling the workgroup radio button instead of the
> domain name button and writing the same workgroup name for the
> laptop, I could accomplish that and later I could still toggle back
> the radio button to go back to what it was: a domain name PC.
> Unfortunately, after this change and reboot, the laptop no longer
> accepted my old User Name and Password and now I have no idea how to
> bring the laptop back and restore it to what it was before I made my
> stupid decision. BTW, I do have administrative privileges to this
> laptop.
>
> Please, if anybody can help me with this before I go back to work with
> the laptop, I would really appreciate it.

You will have to face the music - take the laptop back to work and allow
them to fix what you did.

Not that it matters really - but..
DO you have administrative priviledges as a local user to this laptop or DID
you have administrative priviledges through a domain account?

You tried to do something you did not understand without asking for help.
If you had asked, they may have told you to just map the drives/resources
you need manually - that you do not need to be a member of the home
workgroup (or if it had been your personal laptop - a member of their
domain) to access the resources that workgroup/domain offered. Sure - the
pretty GUI interface may not be there for you, but a simple command
line/script could map just about whatever you need.

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2005 12:36:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

"Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:
> You will have to face the music - take the laptop back to work and
> allow them to fix what you did.
>
> Not that it matters really - but..
> DO you have administrative priviledges as a local user to this laptop
> or DID you have administrative priviledges through a domain account?
>
> You tried to do something you did not understand without asking for
> help. If you had asked, they may have told you to just map the
> drives/resources you need manually - that you do not need to be a
> member of the home workgroup (or if it had been your personal laptop -
> a member of their domain) to access the resources that
> workgroup/domain offered. Sure - the pretty GUI interface may not be
> there for you, but a simple command line/script could map just about
> whatever you need.

Well, this eperience sure has humbled me and I would be the first one to
call myself stupid for it. My administrative privilege is local to this
laptop only and what caused the false confidence in me was those radio
buttons that semed to suggest that you could simply switch between the
workgroup mode to domain assignment by just toggling those buttons. It
never crossed my mind that I could also lose my User Name and Password
by such a switch.

I'm still curious though how my IT guys could log into my PC and
reassign it to that domain. Is there some kind of superuser name and
password that allows them to get into the system no matter what?

Rudy
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2005 2:50:35 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

R. P. wrote:
> At home I was trying to configure the company laptop to work with my
> old home desktop PC as part of the same work group. Originally the
> laptop was set up to a company domain and the workgroup field under
> the Computer Name tab was empty. The laptop uses Win XP
> professional, my desktop uses XP Home Edition. I figured that if I
> switched the laptop from the domain name assignment to workgroup
> assignment by toggling the workgroup radio button instead of the
> domain name button and writing the same workgroup name for the
> laptop, I could accomplish that and later I could still toggle back
> the radio button to go back to what it was: a domain name PC.
> Unfortunately, after this change and reboot, the laptop no longer
> accepted my old User Name and Password and now I have no idea how to
> bring the laptop back and restore it to what it was before I made my
> stupid decision. BTW, I do have administrative privileges to this
> laptop.
>
> Please, if anybody can help me with this before I go back to work with
> the laptop, I would really appreciate it.

Shenan Stanley wrote:
> You will have to face the music - take the laptop back to work and
> allow them to fix what you did.
>
> Not that it matters really - but..
> DO you have administrative priviledges as a local user to this laptop
> or DID you have administrative priviledges through a domain account?
>
> You tried to do something you did not understand without asking for
> help. If you had asked, they may have told you to just map the
> drives/resources you need manually - that you do not need to be a
> member of the home workgroup (or if it had been your personal laptop
> - a member of their domain) to access the resources that
> workgroup/domain offered. Sure - the pretty GUI interface may not be
> there for you, but a simple command line/script could map just about
> whatever you need.

R. P. wrote:
> Well, this eperience sure has humbled me and I would be the first one
> to call myself stupid for it. My administrative privilege is local to
> this laptop only and what caused the false confidence in me was those
> radio buttons that semed to suggest that you could simply switch
> between the workgroup mode to domain assignment by just toggling
> those buttons. It never crossed my mind that I could also lose my
> User Name and Password by such a switch.
>
> I'm still curious though how my IT guys could log into my PC and
> reassign it to that domain. Is there some kind of superuser name and
> password that allows them to get into the system no matter what?

To be honest - you may be able to join this computer back to the domain
yourself with your username/password.

You could try it - if you like - but be warned - the number of times you
would likely be able to do this would be highly limited if it even exists.
You would need to know the Fully Qualified Domain Name (to be safe) and your
username/password in the domain..

In other words:

FQDN: domainname.com
Username: DOMAINNAME\Username

And your password..

You'd need to be on their network/have access to their newtork at the time
you join the domain.

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2005 2:50:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

"Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:
> To be honest - you may be able to join this computer back to the
> domain yourself with your username/password.
>
> You could try it - if you like - but be warned - the number of times
> you would likely be able to do this would be highly limited if it even
> exists. You would need to know the Fully Qualified Domain Name (to be
> safe) and your username/password in the domain..
>
> In other words:
>
> FQDN: domainname.com
> Username: DOMAINNAME\Username
>
> And your password..
>
> You'd need to be on their network/have access to their newtork at the
> time you join the domain.

Hm ...
My fully qualified domain has many parts and follows this pattern:

workstationname.region.nos.company.com

You mean I would have to enter all this and append \Username to all
this? Will that fit in the login field for Username?

Thanks,
Rudy
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2005 11:40:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

R. P. wrote:
> At home I was trying to configure the company laptop to work with my
> old home desktop PC as part of the same work group. Originally the
> laptop was set up to a company domain and the workgroup field under
> the Computer Name tab was empty. The laptop uses Win XP
> professional, my desktop uses XP Home Edition. I figured that if I
> switched the laptop from the domain name assignment to workgroup
> assignment by toggling the workgroup radio button instead of the
> domain name button and writing the same workgroup name for the
> laptop, I could accomplish that and later I could still toggle back
> the radio button to go back to what it was: a domain name PC.
> Unfortunately, after this change and reboot, the laptop no longer
> accepted my old User Name and Password and now I have no idea how to
> bring the laptop back and restore it to what it was before I made my
> stupid decision. BTW, I do have administrative privileges to this
> laptop.
>
> Please, if anybody can help me with this before I go back to work with
> the laptop, I would really appreciate it.

Shenan Stanley wrote:
> You will have to face the music - take the laptop back to work and
> allow them to fix what you did.
>
> Not that it matters really - but..
> DO you have administrative priviledges as a local user to this laptop
> or DID you have administrative priviledges through a domain account?
>
> You tried to do something you did not understand without asking for
> help. If you had asked, they may have told you to just map the
> drives/resources you need manually - that you do not need to be a
> member of the home workgroup (or if it had been your personal laptop
> - a member of their domain) to access the resources that
> workgroup/domain offered. Sure - the pretty GUI interface may not be
> there for you, but a simple command line/script could map just about
> whatever you need.

R. P. wrote:
> Well, this eperience sure has humbled me and I would be the first one
> to call myself stupid for it. My administrative privilege is local to
> this laptop only and what caused the false confidence in me was those
> radio buttons that semed to suggest that you could simply switch
> between the workgroup mode to domain assignment by just toggling
> those buttons. It never crossed my mind that I could also lose my
> User Name and Password by such a switch.
>
> I'm still curious though how my IT guys could log into my PC and
> reassign it to that domain. Is there some kind of superuser name and
> password that allows them to get into the system no matter what?

Shenan Stanley wrote:
> To be honest - you may be able to join this computer back to the
> domain yourself with your username/password.
>
> You could try it - if you like - but be warned - the number of times
> you would likely be able to do this would be highly limited if it
> even exists. You would need to know the Fully Qualified Domain Name
> (to be safe) and your username/password in the domain..
>
> In other words:
>
> FQDN: domainname.com
> Username: DOMAINNAME\Username
>
> And your password..
>
> You'd need to be on their network/have access to their newtork at the
> time you join the domain.

R. P. wrote:
> Hm ...
> My fully qualified domain has many parts and follows this pattern:
>
> workstationname.region.nos.company.com
>
> You mean I would have to enter all this and append \Username to all
> this? Will that fit in the login field for Username?

When you change the "radio button" to Domain from workgroup, you should
enter the FQDN (excluding the workstation name) in the domain field.. i.e.:
region.nos.company.com (However - if your DNS is setup correctly on your
laptop, whatever you saw when logging in would be fine.. For example, if in
the DOMAIN fiel in the logon box you saw "REGION", then you could enter that
in the DOMAIN field when leaving the workgroup for the domain.)

When it asks for the username, your username should be the DOMAIN name
backslash your username: REGION\Username.
(Since you are not a member of the domain yet - you need to tell the
authenticating system you are logging in as the DOMAIN user and not the
local user of that computer - although it may work out either way for you.)

On top of all that - you must be logged into the laptop as a local
administrator.

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 20, 2005 12:47:59 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

"Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:
> When you change the "radio button" to Domain from workgroup, you
> should enter the FQDN (excluding the workstation name) in the domain
> field.. i.e.: region.nos.company.com (However - if your DNS is setup
> correctly on your laptop, whatever you saw when logging in would be
> fine.. For example, if in the DOMAIN fiel in the logon box you saw
> "REGION", then you could enter that in the DOMAIN field when leaving
> the workgroup for the domain.)
>
> When it asks for the username, your username should be the DOMAIN name
> backslash your username: REGION\Username.
> (Since you are not a member of the domain yet - you need to tell the
> authenticating system you are logging in as the DOMAIN user and not
> the local user of that computer - although it may work out either way
> for you.)
>
> On top of all that - you must be logged into the laptop as a local
> administrator.

Well, my company's PC Support guys fixed the problem today. Apparently
each PC has a special Administrator account and password that allows
them to log into it even if users like me screw things up. Next I'm
going to try out Malke's suggestion to map my printer attached to the
desktop PC's LPT1 port to the laptop. Frankly, I've never seen this "net
use" command before because our company printers were all on the network
with their own IP addresses.

Thanks for all the tips you guys gave me. Thanks to you, these MS news
groups are an invaluable resource.

Rudy
March 2, 2006 2:00:30 PM

Try using the Windows boot Tools... It's a handy tool.
!