Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Swiftech Releases H2O-x20 Edge HD Liquid Cooling Kits

Last response: in News comments
Share
November 11, 2011 1:00:03 AM

Swiftech has released two liquid cooling kits, the H20-220 Edge HD and H20-320 Edge HD, which utilize the new Apogee HD CPU waterblock.

Swiftech Releases H2O-x20 Edge HD Liquid Cooling Kits : Read more
November 11, 2011 1:20:41 AM

$10 says that pump is extra loud being directly attached to the rad without any additional insulation.
m
0
l
November 11, 2011 1:48:16 AM

Depending on the price, I'll consider this alongside the Antec Kuhler when I'm doing my build sometime next year.
m
2
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
November 11, 2011 2:21:05 AM

Me feels this is a good combination H2O-320 Edge + H2O-220 Edge but they needed to have both those loops separate for the CPU and the GPUs
m
2
l
November 11, 2011 3:28:35 AM

awesome, i really needed some high definition water cooling
m
1
l
November 11, 2011 4:43:17 AM

i could never trust a water cooler that i have to install myself...
m
0
l
Anonymous
November 11, 2011 6:18:28 AM

lol then pay me with your arm and leg and il set it up for you.
m
3
l
November 11, 2011 8:15:39 AM

eklipz330awesome, i really needed some high definition water cooling


Ohh, the horror!
m
1
l
Anonymous
November 11, 2011 10:01:51 AM

In three out of the four images of the products in use (above) the hot air is being blown back into the case. That makes no sense to me. And in the bottom left image two radiators are shown to be running in series yet the caption says "...for full redundancy."; that's like someone getting RAID 0 and RAID 1 mixed up. This article needs correction and if it is taken verbatim from Swiftech's PR guys then they need to do their research before they try to sell their products.
m
5
l
November 11, 2011 12:15:24 PM

Good. more competition needed!
m
0
l
November 11, 2011 12:50:49 PM

Well, these kits sure look quite a bit better than your standard all in one WC loops...
m
2
l
November 11, 2011 1:21:55 PM

TurranxIn three out of the four images of the products in use (above) the hot air is being blown back into the case. That makes no sense to me. And in the bottom left image two radiators are shown to be running in series yet the caption says "...for full redundancy."; that's like someone getting RAID 0 and RAID 1 mixed up. This article needs correction and if it is taken verbatim from Swiftech's PR guys then they need to do their research before they try to sell their products.


It looks like the only way you could set up a redundant design - redundancy is about being set up in case of failure. If one of the two pumps or sets of fans were to fail then the system would still cycle water and keep the components cooler than not - hence the system has redundancy. Of course chances are it isn't how anyone would actually set it up in real life - they'd rather cool the GPU and CPU separately.

I agree that the set ups look the wrong way round though, with hot air being blown into the case rather than out. Personally I'd flip the fans around.
m
1
l
November 11, 2011 10:54:29 PM

Quote:
$10 says that pump is extra loud being directly attached to the rad without any additional insulation.


Actually the pump is near silent. You'll hear fans running HDD's spinning over that pump.
m
2
l
November 11, 2011 10:55:50 PM

Quote:
i could never trust a water cooler that i have to install myself...


That's typical...real watercooling folks ONLY trust gear they install themselves.

m
1
l
November 11, 2011 11:04:20 PM

Quote:
Well, these kits sure look quite a bit better than your standard all in one WC loops...


You are correct...by a landslide.
m
1
l
November 12, 2011 1:10:22 AM

clonazepam$10 says that pump is extra loud being directly attached to the rad without any additional insulation.


rubix_1011Actually the pump is near silent. You'll hear fans running HDD's spinning over that pump.


I based my comment on the review of the product at overclock3d.net

Quote:
The MCP / DDC pumps are renowned for needing damping when fitting to a case. Without it the noise from the pump resonates into the case and can create a hell of a racket. Swiftech have appeared to have neglected to address this point when bolting the pump to a thin walled metal radiator. The pump noise just gets amplified down the radiator body as it would a case making it incredibly annoying. Some kind of thick gasket needed to be designed for this application to make it much quieter, especially when it's almost made to be run outside of your case.


That was like 5 months ago though so not sure if anything has changed.
m
0
l
November 12, 2011 8:47:44 AM

TurranxIn three out of the four images of the products in use (above) the hot air is being blown back into the case. That makes no sense to me.


Actually the pictures are correct. When using LC, you want the coolest air blowing over the rads and outside air will always be cooler than the air in the box (unless you are using a AC to vent directly inside your box, at which point would be kind of silly to LC). Though the ambient temp inside the case may rise a degree or two, the chips will actually run cooler since the heat exchange happens at the rad instead of a heatsink on the chip, which is the main goal.
m
0
l
Anonymous
November 12, 2011 1:03:46 PM

i bought swiftech products before and found out that they had the worst quality control and customer support. i vowed to never buy from their company again. very disappointed.
m
0
l
November 26, 2011 10:51:48 PM

Wow, this looks great, but it's price is WAY high for me, at least.
m
-1
l
!